Book Reviews of The History of Pendennis : His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy (The World's Classics)

The History of Pendennis : His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy  (The World's Classics)
The History of Pendennis His Fortunes and Misfortunes His Friends and His Greatest Enemy - The World's Classics
Author: William Makepeace Thackeray, John Sutherland
ISBN-13: 9780192831682
ISBN-10: 0192831682
Publication Date: 8/18/1994
Pages: 1,120
Rating:
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Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Book Type: Paperback
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2 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The History of Pendennis : His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy (The World's Classics) on
Written immediately after Vanity Fair, Pendennis has a similar atmosphere of brooding disillusion, tempered by the most jovial of wits.
But here Thakeray plunders his own past to create the character of Pendennis and the world in which he lives: from miserable schoolboy to striving journalist, from carefree Oxbridge to the high (and low) life of London. The result is a superbly panoramic blend of people, action and background. As rich a portrait of England in the 1830s and 40s as it is a thorough and thoroughly entertaining self-portrait.
reviewed The History of Pendennis : His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy (The World's Classics) on + 74 more book reviews
An autobiographical novel based on Thackeray's own youth and young manhood. At 977 pages it isn't for the faint of heart, and the end notes are less helpful than they could be in some places. Still, if you read Victorian novels you're probably used to not quite getting all the references, so that shouldn't be an impediment.

The book does drag in a few places, and there are a few rants the book could do without (like the 'bankrupt authors belong in debtors prison like everyone else who can't pay their bills' rant). If you can skip or overlook these parts, the action moves along as quickly as a 1,000 page novel allows. Things round out to a nice, satisfying conclusion. Not as good as Vanity Fair, but a satisfying read nonetheless.