Book Reviews of Home at Grasmere : Extracts from the Journal of Dorothy Wordsworth (written between 1800 and 1803) and from the Poems of William Wordsworth

Home at Grasmere : Extracts from the Journal of Dorothy Wordsworth (written between 1800 and 1803) and from the Poems of William Wordsworth
Home at Grasmere Extracts from the Journal of Dorothy Wordsworth and from the Poems of William Wordsworth - written between 1800 and 1803
Author: Dorothy Wordsworth, William Wordsworth, Colette Clark
The Market's bargain prices are even better for Paperbackswap club members!
Retail Price: $16.00
Buy New (Paperback): $12.79 (save 20%) or
Become a PBS member and pay $8.89+1 PBS book credit (save 44%)
ISBN-13: 9780140431360
ISBN-10: 0140431365
Publication Date: 2/22/1979
Pages: 304
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 1

4 stars, based on 1 rating
Publisher: Penguin Classics
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Home at Grasmere : Extracts from the Journal of Dorothy Wordsworth (written between 1800 and 1803) and from the Poems of William Wordsworth on
n the introduction it is stated the value of this book lies in the arrangement and presentation of the material. Both Dorothy's journals and William's poems are placed in context. There was harmony of spirit, it is stated, between Dorothy and William.

In Dorothy's journal Coleridge is described as a shadowy and melancholy figure. The dynamo of Dorothy's journal is her love for William. William's unfinished poem, 'the Recluse' is set forth. It contains the impressions of Grasmere. Dorothy and William walked evenings. They went to Rydale for the mail. They met the man who provided the form for 'The Leech-Gatherer.' Coleridge visited. He read CHRISTABEL. Dorothy ironed, gathered material for mattresses, made pies.

From October to December William worked on the poem, 'Michael'. Dorothy describes the ash trees--deep orange lemon color, and some still fresh in summer green. She makes a giblet pie. She reads AMELIA, Richardson. The poem 'Michael' is included in this compilation of Wordsworthian writings. She speaks of putting the rag boxes in order.

William reads aloud to the others from Spenser at tea. Both William and Dorothy read Chaucer. Dorothy's housekeeping and baking run through the diary entries. William is writing out an alteration of Chaucer's CUCKOO AND NIGHTINGALE.

From December to March 1787 to 1788 William is working on a version of 'The Ruined Cottage' from THE EXCURSION. The version is included in this book. The Wordsworth family members speak about Charles Lamb's tragedy, the lethal attack in September 1786 of his sister Mary resulting in his mother's death.

'The Idiot Boy' 1798 is one of the finest examples of the Wordsworth early style the editor notes. William marries Mary Hutchinson October 4, 1802. Assuredly the relationship of brother and sister changes, but this issue is not covered in the excerpts given.