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Topic: Homeschooling and using a public school program

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Subject: Homeschooling and using a public school program
Date Posted: 4/24/2008 7:57 PM ET
Member Since: 4/26/2006
Posts: 3,201
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Just some random thoughts.....

When we first started homeschooling we joined a program called Homelink that was still through  the school district. It did not work for us.

Someone else I know was determined to get into another program like this so they could get refunded for curriculum. Supposedly this other distrcit would even pay for ski lessons etc for PE (I don't have that for fact though..)

I read on our local HS Yahoo group this morning that someone was sending thier kid to PS one hour a day to get their Individial Education Plan..that doesn't make sense to me..if you are HS wouldn't you make up your own IEP?

So back to getting reimbursed..I thought about that at first when I first found out about that other program. If I chose to HS my child, why would I still expect a school district to pay for stuff if I wanted nothing to do with the district itself..yes, sometimes I juggle things around to pay for art classes or soccer equipment..but isn't that my job anyway as a HS parent?

Date Posted: 4/24/2008 8:34 PM ET
Member Since: 10/3/2007
Posts: 1,056
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Personally, I feel it is my job as a homeschool parent to pay for my child's education. However, there are families that simply do not have funds available to provide their child with all of the educational experiences they would like their child to have - such as art classes, music lessons. sports activities etc.   That is why some enroll their child in classes through programs like Homelink. They feel that since they are paying taxes that fund these types of classes and they can participate by only having their child in art, or science, etc. and still homeschool , why not.

There is a very wide range of types of people that have chosen to homeschool and the degree of involvement with the public school system that they care to have is also wide. Some do not want to have any involvement with it for philosophical or religious reasons and on the other spectrum are those that really have no problem with being as involved as possible and may have some children in p.s while they homeschool others.  

As far as the IEP plan, I think it depends on the state laws. I beleive in some states(maybe it's a federal law ?) that a child that needs an IEP plan has to have it set up by a person recognized by the state as being qualified. This family may be using the services of the p.s. so they don't have to pay for a private person or organization to set it up. An IEP plan is for a child with special educational needs. This label has legal requirements attached to it that must be met by law.

 

 There are some that have strong religious beliefs that the government has no place in educating our children but many homeschooers seem to be neutral on this and are homeschooling  for other reasons.

I do hope this topic does not get hot, unless of course, it remains very cordial and polite.

Date Posted: 4/24/2008 10:13 PM ET
Member Since: 4/26/2006
Posts: 3,201
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I wasn't meaning to start a debate..I was just having random thoughts...

Everything you said makes sense though, gives me some other things to think about.

Subject: dual enrolled
Date Posted: 4/24/2008 10:22 PM ET
Member Since: 5/14/2007
Posts: 337
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My sons are dual enrolled in public school but take no classes at PS..  We took them out of public school so two of them had IEPs and the area education association had to agree to us homeschooling.  It simplified getting permission to homeschool by dual enrolling.  The supervising teacher is a Christian homeschool mother herself who has been great.  She does the paperwork for us and  visits once a month.  No pressure.  We use curriculuum of our choice not the schools, most of which we purchase ourselves.  I prefer to have what we want when we want it so that is why I purchase what I want for them..  This has worked for us.  I know it may not be for others,   

LaDonna

Date Posted: 4/25/2008 8:35 AM ET
Member Since: 10/9/2006
Posts: 88
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From the PS perspective, the district receives funding based on the number of enrolled students.  The PS student taught at home costs the district far less to oversee than the student in the classroom.  This is why some districts offer what seem to be extravagant extras to return to PS oversight:  the district is still making money on the enrolled student.

Adrianne

Date Posted: 4/25/2008 9:10 AM ET
Member Since: 3/20/2007
Posts: 931
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Here in IL, on my DD's IEP, I have the option of having her homeschool as her LRE (least restrictive environment).  She has always been in the PS system, and her brother has always HS'ed.  I simply don't have the funds to purchase all the special equipment, pc programs, etc., to teach her at home.  BUT, if we wanted to, we could, and still get IEP *services* from the school district.  That would mean she could get her physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy at school, paid for by the district.  This would (well, does) save a ton of copays and deductibles on our health insurance.

So, yes, you *can* have an IEP at home that you make yourself.  You can have an IEP the school district makes and just go "part time" (probably  just for therapy sessions), or you can go full time on an IEP.  It's completely up to the parents what they want to do. 

Mary, the person you mentioned probably *only* has their child in the PS for therapy...to receive the *services* in the IEP.  I highly doubt the child is going to any class, unless like my DD, s/he has something like adaptive PE class.  My DD gets both "regular" PE and adaptive, in which the physical therapist and SpEd PE teacher work together to work on my DD's gross and fine motor skills.

Here in IL we are one of only two states that have a state income tax credit for educational expenses (public, private, or HS'ing), so in a way, we're "paid back" by the state for our expenses.  We rec'd $356 back this last year on over $3000 of HS'ing expenses.  Every little bit helps.

Some people do enjoy being tied to a PS.  Many times if a child is only HS'ing temporarily, it's good to stay connected.  Some people use public charter schools at home, as a "bridge" between PS and HS.

The wonderful thing is that there are so many programs, and how every family is free to choose them, or skip them entirely.

JC

Date Posted: 4/26/2008 1:02 AM ET
Member Since: 2/2/2007
Posts: 4,588
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Is this the same as using a charter school? I have friends that use charter schools and love the fringe benefits of electives classes and sports and such.

Date Posted: 4/26/2008 4:23 PM ET
Member Since: 10/28/2007
Posts: 191
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Our family has been through many different types of schools.  My oldest child is deaf.  He started with a private preschool for deaf students and their parents.  He then attended a public school in a self contained classroom.  He adventually attended a state school for the deaf which happend to be in the city where we live and every year we had to do an IEP.  I started attending a homeschool support group for christian parents when my daughter was in preschool.  It really lessened my fears when I adventually starting homeschooling her.  But first she spent a year at a private christian school kindergarden. They used Abeka and the teacher there was exceptional.  When family and my husband was uncomfortable with the continued homeschooling (mostly out of fear) I had to make a compromise and in 4th grade she again went to a private christian school.  At that time my twins were starting first grade and with the compromise with my husband, I was allowed to continue to homeschool them.  Because one of my twins was so set on going to a classroom like her big sister we enrolled in a local public school program that is for homeschool families.  We could take as little or as many hours of class time as we wanted but we were restricted a lot because of the amount required record keeping and later with state required testing.  I now (4th grade) only homeschool the twins and my older daughter will most likely finish her last year at the christian school next year (8th grade) which is where I also work part time.  Here in our area we have the blessing of a husband and wife along with other supporting families that started  a Christian Homeschool Co-op program a couple of years ago.  We call it Friday School.  We all work together to create a homeschool community with classes, activities and worship time together.  So there have been many aspects to my Homeschooling experience over the years.

The object of this story is what I see as the real definition of what it means to homeschool.  It is the freedom to be in charge of all aspects of our childrens education.  Accademicaly, socially or spiritally,  Without fear from government, educational institutions, society,  family,  neighbors,  newsmedia or anyone else including ourselves.  We should not fear our own abilbity to educate our children.   

I hope that you were willing to read this whole statement.  It is not ment to offend anyone, but only to bring together and encourage.  I am not one to say a lot, but wanted only to share my experience so far as a homeschool parent.



Last Edited on: 4/26/08 4:27 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 4/26/2008 4:30 PM ET
Member Since: 10/28/2007
Posts: 191
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Anyone who may be interested in Friday School. here is their link.  Thanks, Melita

www.fchm.org

Date Posted: 4/26/2008 8:24 PM ET
Member Since: 4/26/2006
Posts: 3,201
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thanks for the other aspects. I truly had not thought of some of these things.

Date Posted: 4/27/2008 3:39 AM ET
Member Since: 10/3/2007
Posts: 1,056
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Ditto on what Mary C said " thanks for the other aspects. I truly had not thought of some of these things."  JC said some things about IEP's I did not know. I'm sure there are lots of educational situations, especially when a child has special needs, that people need to use various resources for  that many of us didn't even know existed.  I think the resources available in the public school system for special needs varies from state to state and even from school district to school district.



Last Edited on: 4/27/08 3:41 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 4/28/2008 10:45 AM ET
Member Since: 7/6/2006
Posts: 184
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I just think homeschoolers need to be careful about what they take from the govt., because the govt. taking from us is not usually long after.  JMO

Date Posted: 4/28/2008 11:32 AM ET
Member Since: 3/20/2007
Posts: 931
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Sherry H said:

<<I think the resources available in the public school system for special needs varies from state to state and even from school district to school district.>>

This is *absolutely* correct.  We had a recent state-state move and the whole SpEd/IEP process was a NIGHTMARE!  I was so glad my son was HS'ing b/c going through it w/ one child was bad enough!

Kristi G said:

<<I just think homeschoolers need to be careful about what they take from the govt., because the govt. taking from us is not usually long after.>>

For kids with special needs, sometimes that is just not an option.  My DD has to get her physical, occupational, and speech therapy through the school district.  Why?  Because therapy in our area costs $535 per *hour*.  We'd have to pay that until our deductible was met, then pay 20% of it ($107) per session, thereafter.  It is just not doable since she already uses 30% of my DH's income on medical needs.

I'm aware of the whole "public school/government vs. homeschooling" debate.  However, I've yet to see, in over five years of HS'ing, *any* incidence of where the gov't has come down on HS'ers due to the mix of PS and HS.

I've never used virtual charter schools (which are public schools), but I have worked for two of them.  I've seen the great number of families they can help.  Two of my best friends were able to educate at home due to a virtual PS program.  Otherwise, they just couldn't do it (various reasons).  They can also help single parents, and families where one parent doesn't agree with "pure homeschooling".  It can be a great bridge between PS and HS.  Many virtual school families I've worked with decided after 1-2 years of the virtual school, to continue home education, but to do it independently, w/o PS input.  They finally felt confident that they can do it.

I know in my state, many HS'ers are afraid to claim the state tax education expense credit.  They think it means "big, bad, government" is going to come and "get them".  The state's had the credit for many years, and it has yet to change any HS'ing regulations in our state (one of the easiest to HS in).  Until someone can prove that the gov't is "after" HS'ers, I'm not going to worry about it.

Respectfully,

JC

Date Posted: 5/5/2008 2:38 PM ET
Member Since: 10/3/2007
Posts: 1,056
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From J.C's post above   " Because therapy in our area costs $535 per *hour*."    That is an astronomical price. There are very few families that could ever afford to pay $535 an hour for therapy.  Hopefully, these services ARE available in the p.s.  system. My suspicion is, that the services are scattered and are only available to some families in the p.s. system.