Book Reviews of The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1)

The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1)
The Hostage Bride - Bride Trilogy, Bk 1
Author: Jane Feather
ISBN-13: 9780553578904
ISBN-10: 0553578901
Publication Date: 6/1/1998
Pages: 366
Rating:
  • Currently 3.6/5 Stars.
 182

3.6 stars, based on 182 ratings
Publisher: Bantam
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

13 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 929 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
I read Olivia's story first and thought it was just okay. I'm glad I didn't read this one first because I probably would have had too high of an expectation for Olivia's. I loved this one. The characters were so much fun and I adored Portia's "can do" spirit. Her antics and banter with Rufus was great. They were so playful together. Yes, Rufus gets moody and unreasonable but he comes around from being an idiot most of the time so he becomes endearing.

Great, easy read.
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 136 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
~ Terrific 17th century romance with a highly unusual heroine and an easy-to-fall-for hero (4.5 stars) ~

THE HOSTAGE BRIDE is the first in Jane Feather's Brides Trilogy, but I actually read it after having already read THE ACCIDENTAL BRIDE (Book 2) and THE LEAST LIKELY BRIDE (Book 3). I normally read Regency and Victorian era romances, but I really loved this book and although Feather writes in much more of a historical background than one often gets from regency romances, it is by no means overwhelming and only adds to the book.

The age difference between the hero and heroine (she's 17 and we don't know Rufus's age exactly, but ~early 30s) bothered me, but I just changed her age in my mind since it's only mentioned once or twice, lol. The feud which dominates the book and the misunderstanding at the end between the hero and heroine are quite quickly and anti-climatically resolved, but I really can't complain - I hate it when authors feel they have to throw obstacle after obstacle between the main characters and extend misunderstandings for more than half the book, so I'm thankful Feather did neither. I really enjoyed THE HOSTAGE BRIDE and would highly recommend it. Great characters, unusual heroine, easy-to-fall-for hero, well-written chemistry, and an interesting plot with great twists and turns - all in all, a definite keeper and reread!

MAIN CHARACTERS:
The hero and heroine in this book were terrific; I read that some reviewers were not compelled by their connection or didn't feel the chemistry between them, but I strongly disagree. Portia and Rufus are perfect for each other - they are both outcasts in a way, unsure of their place in the world and not really belonging anywhere. They're very strong and courageous individuals who have suffered through loss and loneliness, yet retain their humor and good nature.

There is no annoying love-at-first-sight (which I always find hard to believe) in this book and the initial antagonism and teasing between them is really fun to read; the chemistry and sexual tension between them is well-written. I love the verbal sparring and battle of wills that often goes on between main characters in romances, but I also love the scenes of humor and tenderness and love, and you definitely get both of these sides in the book.

Portia is a very unusual heroine - she's extremely skinny, not particularly pretty or womanly, has flame-red hair and freckles, and is a bastard/by-blow tomboy who wants to be a soldier. She's had a difficult life and right after we meet her at the beginning of the book (excluding the preface which introduces us to the three heroines of the Brides trilogy) her father dies and she is left basically all alone in the world. She's independent and brave, smart and loyal, and IMO a perfect match for Rufus.

Rufus is a wonderful hero; he's got that roguish-bad-boy appeal, but he's also sweet and thoughtful and really cares about the people in his life. Watching him fall for Portia, a little slip of a girl, is so fun, and just as Portia finds a sense of belonging by his side, it's great to see him find peace and love with her after feeling an outcast and being ruled by revenge for so long.

SIMILAR BOOKS:
Other romances that have the kidnapping theme and that I've really enjoyed include: THE LEAST LIKELY BRIDE by Jane Feather (last book in the Brides Trilogy); THE BRIDE THIEF by Jacquie D'Alessandro; TO CATCH AN HEIRESS (Agents for the Crown, Book 1) by Julia Quinn; IRRESISTIBLE (second in the Banning Sisters Trilogy) by Karen Robards; THE RUNAWAY PRINCESS (Princess Series, Book 1) by Christina Dodd; and HONOR'S SPLENDOUR by Julie Garwood.
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 4 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Enjoyable and entertaining. Nice to read a book that does not follow all the other plots.
Portia is her own woman and very unconventional. A woman who can do anything a man can do. I enjoyed reading about her journey to become a soldier but still remain a woman who needs her friends and a loving family.
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 131 more book reviews
This is an awesome series. Set in olden times, with good romance. My book cover is different than this one.
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 110 more book reviews
I just returned to author Jane Feather and was glad I did. Hostage Bride was a very interesting read, although the wording can be confusing at times. This story of Portia followed along nicely thru the accidental kidnapping to falling in love. A good read!!
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 1111 more book reviews
This book is the start of a new series by Jane Feather (see list at the end). The trio of stories is about three awkward girls who sign a pact to never marry but do something extraordinary with their lives. The 3 misfits are named: Portia, Phoebe and Olivia. Although all 3 appear in this book, this is really Portias story.

The year is 1643 and Civil War is on the horizon of England and Scotland. Feather does a good job of weaving fiction with real events in British history.

I wont go into detail about the plot but will give some of my impressions. Portia is about 17 and the hero (Rufus Decatur) is in his mid-thirties! I felt the age difference was very significant.

Portias goal, in the preface, was to be a soldier. It stretched credulity that she was good enough to fight with the outlaw, Rufus Decatur. Portia, because she was the bastard daughter of the brother of the Marquis of Granville, we know that Portia has had a difficult life. Her father, Jack, a drunk and womanizer dies in the opening pages of the book, leaving Portia a penniless orphan.

The book kept my attention and I found it exciting, however I found it to be a bit much. The story seemed a bit over the top. The actions of the heroine (particularly) and the hero did not seem realistic. Feathers plotting was wonderful. 3.5 stars
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 88 more book reviews
The first book in the "Brides" trilogy. Three unconventional young women who vow they will never marry only to be overtaken by destiny.
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 3389 more book reviews
It's bad enough that seventeen-year-old Portia Worth is taken in by her uncle, the marquis of Granville, after her father dies. As the bastard niece, Portia knows she can expect little beyond a roof over head and a place at the table.
But it truly adds insult to injury when the Granvilles' archenemy, the outlaw Rufus Decatur, hatches a scheme to abduct the marquis's daughter---only to kidnap Portia by accident.
Portia,who possesses more than a streak of independence as well as talent for resistance, does not take kindly to being abducted---mistakenly or otherwise.
Decatur will soon find himself facing the challenge of his life, both on the battlefield and in the bedroom, as he contends with this misfit of a girl who has the audicity to believe herself the equal of any man...
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 8 more book reviews
I have a different cover. It's similar with purple background instead of white.
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 61 more book reviews
The first of the "Brides" Trilogies. It is bad enough that 17 year old POrtia Worth is taken in by her uncle, the marquis of Granville, after her father dies. As the bastard niece, Portia knows she can expect little beyond a roof over her head and a place at the table. But it truly adds insult to injury when the Granvilles' archenemy, the outlaw Rufus Decatur, hatches a scheme to abduct the marquis's daughter - only to kidnap Portia by accident. Portia, who possesses more than a streak of independence as well as a talent for resistance, does not take kindly to being abducted. Decatur will soon find himself facing the challenge of his life, both on the battlefield and in the bedroom, as he contends with this misfit of a girl who has the audacity to believe herself the equal of any man!
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 168 more book reviews
I do not normally read in this era-the 1600's. This story takes place during the war between King Charles and Parliament (Oliver Cromwell). I really do not find the era interesting, but at least these characters are engaging. Skip through all of the blood and gore and I like the story. I like the way Jane Feather tells it. There are three books in this series and I plan to read the other two. Recommend.
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 48 more book reviews
great book couldn't put it down
reviewed The Hostage Bride (Bride Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 3389 more book reviews
Amazon.com
Prolific Jane Feather launches another lively trilogy, this one set during the English Civil War (mid-17th century) and featuring the first of three misfit girls who pledge their friendship and mutual distrust of men. Portia Worth, a bastard offshoot now dependent on the marquis of Granville for support, is mistaken for Granville's daughter and accidentally abducted by Rufus Decatur, Granville's archenemy and leader of a militia group whose purpose is to support the king against Parliament and avenge the wrong done to Rufus's family years ago. Both outcasts, Portia and Rufus develop a mutual understanding and admiration that blossoms into heartfelt passion. But Rufus's need for revenge puts Portia precariously on the opposite side of a battle he's determined to see through to the death. Readers will love the well-drawn characters, both major and minor; action scenes that move swiftly and vividly; and Portia's humorous plot to vanquish a particularly vile male villain, which may leave readers laughing out loud. An especially appealing tale that's sure to raise anticipation for the next book in the Brides series. --Ellen Edwards