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Topic: ISBN AND PUBLISHERS

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Subject: ISBN AND PUBLISHERS
Date Posted: 7/9/2008 4:49 PM ET
Member Since: 3/10/2008
Posts: 34
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I'M CHANGING MY PAPERBACK SERIES TO HARDCOVER! 

QUESTION;

IS THERE ONE  ISBN  WHEN  YOU  HAVE  TWO  DIFFERENT  PUBLISHERS?

I  SELECT  CERTAIN  PUBLISHERS  WHEN  SELECTING  HARDCOVERS,  BUT  I'M  RECEIVING  A  DIFFERENT PUBLISHER.

IS THIS NORMAL AT PBS?

I'M TRYING TO KEEP MY BOOKS FROM LOOKING LIKE A ROLLER-COASTER RIDE ON MY BOOKSHELF.

 

Date Posted: 7/9/2008 5:42 PM ET
Member Since: 7/7/2007
Posts: 4,815
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Kd--

ISBNs are publisher-specific; part of the "code" within the ISBN identifies the publisher.  A publisher may choose to use the same ISBN for multiple editions (i.e. hardcover and paper), but an ISBN is not shared between publishers.

If you get a book which does not match the 4 elements PBS requires (title, author, format and ISBN), you should mark it RWP, "wrong book" and let the sender know.  Publisher is not one of the required elements, but if the ISBN matches, so should the publisher. 

Perhaps it is an imprint issue?  Imprints are sort of like smaller brands which fall under a larger publisher.  For example, Bantam and Doubleday are 2 common imprints under the larger brand of Random House publishing.  If you had a book by Bantam, it could be listed as Random House and still be accurate.

I hope this helps.

Cheers,

Catt

 

 

Date Posted: 7/9/2008 6:28 PM ET
Member Since: 6/14/2008
Posts: 417
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I've noticed that often the 'bookclub' and 'regular' hardcover books will share an ISBN. Sometimes the publisher is the same, sometimes different - but I guess they could be imprints as Elizabeth said.

Date Posted: 7/11/2008 7:37 AM ET
Member Since: 1/12/2008
Posts: 1,356
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Catt--I've often wondered how to 'decode' an ISBN--any idea what the component numbers of an ISBN designate?

Date Posted: 7/11/2008 8:31 AM ET
Member Since: 8/26/2006
Posts: 9,327
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KD, you could set up a "Requestor Conditon" in "My Account --> Settings" for a particular book before ordering it, then turn your RC off after ordering it so that it won't be there for other orders that come up.

You could PM the sender and ask a question or two about the book.  Just write your question as clearly and simply as possible, so you don't have to exchange 6 PMs back and forth!

Date Posted: 7/15/2008 1:54 AM ET
Member Since: 3/25/2007
Posts: 369
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any idea what the component numbers of an ISBN designate?

Basically, the 10- and 13- digits are the same (not the same number, necessarily, just the same meaning), but for the 3 digit GS1 code (978 or 979) on 13s (ETA - GS1 assigns country codes.  978 and 979 are assigned to the fictitious country of Bookland.  I kid you not.  Aren't they cute?)

Next is a Group Identifier based on language-sharing countries - ie, English-speaking countries are 1 or 0.  The Group Identifiers are: 2 for French-speaking countries, 3 for German-speaking countries, 4 for Japanese-speaking, 5 for Russian-speaking, and 7 for Chinese-speaking - and Group Identifiers can be up to 5 digits.  I have a HUGE list of these, although why, I'm not sure.  Even I don't sell too many Russian-language books and I can't seem to find any good swapping sites for Spanish, forget about Chinese!

Then there's a publisher number - there are over half a million of them, so we won't list any here, lol.  You can actually buy a book of them.  I don't know the ISBN of it, though.  I could go look, but I'm lazy.  These numbers are issued to publishers in blocks, and if they need more, they stand a good chance of getting a new publisher number.  Not that they care, although Harlequin might.  Some publishers re-use ISBNs, Harlequin does... well, did.  It's annoying.

THEN there's the item number, specific to the title.  Annnnnd, finally, there's a check sum.  That's the last number. Want to check a random ISBN?  Here's how:

With 10s - The first nine digits is multiplied by a number in a sequence from 10 to 2, and the remainder of the sum, with respect to 11, is computed. The resulting remainder, plus the check digit, must equal 11; therefore, the check digit is 11 minus the remainder of the sum of the products.  Got that?  I don't think you really care, lmbo.  The only interesting part is that "10" = "X", that's why some 10-digit ISBNs end in "X"

With 13s - The first 12 digits are alternately multiplied by 1 or 3, then those products are summed and divided by 10 end with a number ranging from 0 to 9. Subtracted from 10, that leaves a result from 1 to 10. A zero replaces a ten, so, no 13s will end in "X".

There, glad you asked?  I am, I thought I'd never get to say that.  I said it all once to my husband, but he fell asleep.  HEY!  Did you fall asleep, too?????  ;-)



Last Edited on: 7/15/08 1:56 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 7/15/2008 1:37 PM ET
Member Since: 7/7/2007
Posts: 4,815
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<<Catt--I've often wondered how to 'decode' an ISBN--any idea what the component numbers of an ISBN designate?>>

Anna covered it very nicely, but in case you have trouble sleeping at night, the US ISBN folks can tell you way more than you ever wanted to know: http://www.isbn.org/standards/home/index.asp  as can the International ISBN folks: http://isbn-international.org/en/revision.html

The Canadians have a nice little barcode diagram which illustrates it all nicely: http://www.lac-bac.gc.ca/isn/041011-1020-e.html

Cheers,
Catt