Book Reviews of No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting

No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting
No Idle Hands The Social History of American Knitting
Author: Anne MacDonald
ISBN-13: 9780345339065
ISBN-10: 0345339061
Publication Date: 8/12/1988
Pages: 484
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 2

3.8 stars, based on 2 ratings
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

4 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting on + 12 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
I never treasured socks until I read this book. The history behind knitting and the first few chapters of this book will teach the importance of knitting to past generations. During wars people were assessed (taxed)a number of socks to provide for the troops. During earlier times everyone knitted even young children, from necessity. During wartime the health of troops depended on warm wool socks. Not until much later did knitting become a leisure hobby or art. The first chapters of this books were an eye opener for me. I bought because I am a knitter, I learned so much much more. The first few chapters should be required reading to help teach differences in want and true need; and the value of simple resources and skills.
reviewed No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting on + 27 more book reviews
Full of interesting information, if you can stick with it. Very dry read.
reviewed No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting on + 75 more book reviews
This book presents an intriguing view of the role of women in American history as uniquely represented through the art and craft of knitting. From Colonial times to the present, women have expressed their patriotism, creativity, fashion sense, and personal style in this practical art form.
reviewed No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting on + 30 more book reviews
This book was a wonderful walk through history, showing how knitting was a part of everyday life through war and peace, poverty and prosperity. The author is indeed an historian, so the book is well researched from primary sources. The photographs and illustrations are great, too. See pictures of First Ladies knitting, children knitting, and some of the things they knit--both ordinary and unusual.

Accounts of some knitters' feats of knitting productivity during wartime might inspire you to pick up your needles and save the world!