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Topic: Interesting article on religion and political party identification

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L. G. (L)
Subject: Interesting article on religion and political party identification
Date Posted: 8/11/2008 5:30 AM ET
Member Since: 9/5/2005
Posts: 12,412
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The data is dated (2001) but I suspect it holds true:

http://www.publicopinionpros.com/features/2005/june/keysar.asp

A few surprises for me, except for the data on Independants - it sort of makes sense.

Date Posted: 8/13/2008 2:28 PM ET
Member Since: 6/25/2007
Posts: 5,637
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Very interesting!

I agree about the Independants, that didn't surprise me.

L. G. (L)
Date Posted: 8/13/2008 3:27 PM ET
Member Since: 9/5/2005
Posts: 12,412
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i was surprised that so many Mormons make up the support for the Repubs.  It makes sense that they would be conservative, though I expected more to be independant.

ETA: If you look at the American Religion Identification Survey (linked in the artivcle I linked) there are some surprises as well.  I had no idea there were so many Catholics in the US.  Also, the number of those who self-identified with "no religion" doubled between 1990 and 2001!  That's amazing to me.

 



Last Edited on: 8/13/08 3:35 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 8/13/2008 11:57 PM ET
Member Since: 11/28/2006
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I think there are more people in the USA who self-identify with "No Religion" than we think.  The problem is - many of them are unwilling to admit it, because of pressure from family, friends, work place, etc.  Some people have been raised with religion and now want no part of it but its very hard to admit that you no longer believe in something that has been drilled into you from childhood. 

Another issue is that non-believers tend to not be "joiners" in the sense that we don't usually belong to any organization, so it's not easy to identify us.  Organizing unbelievers is like herding cats!

 

L. G. (L)
Date Posted: 8/14/2008 1:07 AM ET
Member Since: 9/5/2005
Posts: 12,412
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I hear, "I used to be a _______ (organized religion) but now I'm an atheist/agnostic."  a lot.  I wonder about those who self-identify but don't really practice.  I think a lot of people attend services because they feel they are supposed to, not that they really get anything from it (knew a lot of these types - especially those who live in the same town as their parents.)  And then there are those who only go to services on the Holidays but don't practice.

 

Date Posted: 8/14/2008 9:39 PM ET
Member Since: 6/25/2007
Posts: 5,637
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Most of my family consider themselves Catholics, and if asked and if filling out a form would check off Catholic. 95% of them have not been to Church (outside funerals and weddings) in 20+ years and don't practice in anyway. I have a feeling it's like that with some people. They just check off whatever they were raised, even if they are not practicing.

When my mom says she is Catholic I always say, "Would the Pope feel the same way?"



Last Edited on: 8/14/08 9:41 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 8/17/2008 6:39 PM ET
Member Since: 1/13/2005
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When my mom says she is Catholic I always say, "Would the Pope feel the same way?"

LOL!!  My mother and aunts are the same, and my aunt's response to a similar question is: "I don't care what he thinks!  What does he know?!  I'm a Catholic, I just don't think he knows everything!"   I love this answer . . . .   

I think L and Beverly are right, lots of people who really don't believe the tenets of the church to which they nominally belong would never admit it for fear of family and public uproar.  In light of the fact that one of our presidential candidates has essentially had to PROVE he's a Christian to be considered eligible for the job, I can understand their fears.  A particular belief system should not be a requirement for public office in this country, but though it's not written into the Constitution, that requirement obviously exists. 

If everyone answered honestly, would there be more non-believers than believers overall?  In a specific political party?  In those who aren't affiliated with a party?

L. G. (L)
Date Posted: 8/18/2008 5:51 PM ET
Member Since: 9/5/2005
Posts: 12,412
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I think for some religions - Judaism and Catholicism particularly -  for many the feeling is "Once a _______, always a ________ " (insert religion).  Even though people may not practice the religion, they identify with it culturally and will always consier themselves  __________ (Jewish, Catholic, etc.)

Date Posted: 8/19/2008 2:26 AM ET
Member Since: 9/16/2007
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Well, Judaism is a little different than nay of the others, because it's more than a religion.  I know plenty of secular Jews - agnostics, atheists, whatever.  But they're still Jews, because we're a people as much (maybe more) than we're a religion. 

L. G. (L)
Date Posted: 8/19/2008 3:47 PM ET
Member Since: 9/5/2005
Posts: 12,412
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Jeanne, I would agree, but I have had other Jews tell me that it's "no more than a religion" because Jews come in all ethnicities/from all cultures.  Prior to that I always felt/believed the way you do.  Not being Jewish, I don't know! :)   And then there are those who covert and those who are half-Jewish (maternal and paternal)- where do they fall?  I have heard varying opinions on these issues and I suspect many non-Jewish people  are confused about this.