Book Reviews of Invisible

Invisible
Invisible
Author: Pete Hautman
ISBN-13: 9780689868009
ISBN-10: 0689868006
Publication Date: 5/17/2005
Pages: 160
Rating:
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 4

3.9 stars, based on 4 ratings
Publisher: Simon Schuster Children's Publishing
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

4 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Invisible on + 49 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
We meet Dougie in Pete Hautman's novel "Invisible" and gradually enter his world. School is trying; he's not popular, but that's okay as long as everyone leaves him alone. He believes in focus, and intelligence, and he is devoted to his best friend Andy. The author does an excellent job of creating tension...the slowly dawning suspicion that not everything is right or as it seems. The dread continues to build until the stunning conclusion. I loved it while at the same time I found it faintly disturbing.
reviewed Invisible on + 336 more book reviews
I'm really surprised at how much I liked this. I checked Invisible out of the library on the recommendation of a librarians helper and once I got it home I really wasn't expecting to finish it, much less like it. My hope fell even lower when it dawned on me (on the first page) that trains are a big part of the book. I have no interest in trains if that needs to be said
So, I have this thing with not finishing books so I always give them my best shot and I'm glad I do because this is worth reading. I have to admit to being shocked at the whole Andy thing. I was on a totally different plane with that one. Somewhere in the first quarter I started smirking to myself, thinking I knew what was supposed to be learned later. But Hautman got one over on me. I'm still surprised at how interesting and well intigrated the aspect of trains were too.
The fact that Doug's "problems" weren't megaphoned out to the reader was exciting and it left it up to the reader to decide what was happening with him. The fact that it wasn't spelled out did a lot for the book I think.
I'm definitely going to check out Hautman's other titles. I'd certainly recommend this to young readers, male reluctant readers especially although I think females could relate to Doug just as well in a lot of cases. (my review - also on GoodReads)
reviewed Invisible on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Mechele R. Dillard for TeensReadToo.com

Seventeen-year-old Doug Hanson just wants to be alone with his trains. No one understands him except his best friend, Andy. His parents make him see a counselor, which he knows is pointless: Dr. Ahlstrom is not helping me one bit. Why? Because I do not need help--it's as simple as that (p. 22). So he doesn't want to make new friends or hang out with the kids at school--does that make him "troubled?" Of course not. But only Andy seems to understand that and accept him as he is.

Hautman draws the reader into the world he creates and holds them captive. One becomes as mesmerized with the model bridge Doug is building as he is; after a couple of rounds of counting by seventeens, this reader finds herself giving it a try. As the story unfolds, she begins to wish everyone would just get off Doug's back and let him build his models. Must everyone be popular, after all?

INVISIBLE is an excellent choice for readers who enjoy a bit of mystery with their realism, and Hautman is a master of words, only revealing "why" when the reader is least cognizant that there is even a question waiting to be answered.
reviewed Invisible on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Mechele R. Dillard for TeensReadToo.com

Seventeen-year-old Doug Hanson just wants to be alone with his trains. No one understands him except his best friend, Andy. His parents make him see a counselor, which he knows is pointless: Dr. Ahlstrom is not helping me one bit. Why? Because I do not need help--it's as simple as that (p. 22). So he doesn't want to make new friends or hang out with the kids at school--does that make him "troubled?" Of course not. But only Andy seems to understand that and accept him as he is.

Hautman draws the reader into the world he creates and holds them captive. One becomes as mesmerized with the model bridge Doug is building as he is; after a couple of rounds of counting by seventeens, this reader finds herself giving it a try. As the story unfolds, she begins to wish everyone would just get off Doug's back and let him build his models. Must everyone be popular, after all?

INVISIBLE is an excellent choice for readers who enjoy a bit of mystery with their realism, and Hautman is a master of words, only revealing "why" when the reader is least cognizant that there is even a question waiting to be answered.