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Topic: January genre of the month is Romance

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Subject: January genre of the month is Romance
Date Posted: 1/2/2012 10:51 PM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
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Mkay, if you have already read from this genre you can go ahead and start discussing it. If you are unfamiliar with it though you can chose to read a book from this genre to get an idea of what it is like and then join in.

Personally I've read a few in my time and while I don't hate the genre it will never be my go to one either. It tends to bring to mind cliche's of heaving bossums and throbbing members or just uneventful and uninspired plot lines.

Date Posted: 1/2/2012 11:12 PM ET
Member Since: 11/12/2011
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Lol, what a first genre to randomly get. I was looking forward to reading A Reliable Wife for January. Do I dare suggest that we save the romance genre for February? Then, at least, we'll blend in.



Last Edited on: 1/2/12 11:13 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 1/3/2012 12:34 AM ET
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I go where the gods of random say. I was thinking of ARW as historical fiction though.

When I think of romance I think of Harlequins.



Last Edited on: 1/3/12 12:39 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 1/3/2012 7:04 AM ET
Member Since: 11/12/2011
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You're right. The gods of random need their tribute. A romance won't take that long to read.

Barb S. (okbye) - ,
Date Posted: 1/3/2012 1:25 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2011
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I haven't read that many but I wouldn't normally choose to read a romance. I read one a few months ago by accident, it was set in Scotland and the description did not make it sound like a romance so it was a bit of a surprise but once I start a book I have to finish it. The problem I have with them is the basic stories are all the same. There's only so many ways to meet and fall in love so if you red a couple romances you're done, you've read them all. Obviously not everyone agrees with that but that's my challenge question - what do you get out of reading the same basic book over and over again? Or alternatively - what is the difference between the books? Maybe I just don't get it. 

Date Posted: 1/3/2012 10:10 PM ET
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Barb, I think the appeal is the sameness, it's comforting and reliable. Every Mrs. Pollifax book has the same plot with different place and auxillary character names but Mrs. P is like an old friend to me now.

Date Posted: 1/4/2012 6:59 AM ET
Member Since: 11/12/2011
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I've noticed that one romance author can generate a never-ending supply of spin offs. Romance 1 is about Susi Heartthrob and her mother is one of the characters in it. Romance 2 is a flashback to Mama Heartthrob's past - how her and Mr. Heartthrob met. Romance 3 is about Sheri Heartthrob, Susi's even fiestier younger cousin. Etc, etc. Has anyone noticed this?

Date Posted: 1/4/2012 10:10 AM ET
Member Since: 7/10/2011
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Since I never read Harlequin, I can't say that I have noticed that, but DW, your post brings to mind the cozy mysteries.  I am totally addicted to them, and your point could  be made about them as well.  Sleuth is introduced, solves a murder, next book best friend is accused, next mentor is accused, next mentor is murdered, then ex-husband is accused.  I still read them as much as I can.  To Barb's point, they are also the same basic book, but somehow I still manage not to figure out who done it until the end. 

Date Posted: 1/4/2012 12:25 PM ET
Member Since: 11/12/2011
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I've seen it all over on PBS, but I'm not quite clear on what a cozy mystery is. It's not a series, is it? Or a broader label?

Date Posted: 1/4/2012 5:45 PM ET
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A cozy is a mystery starring an ameture slueth who solves crimes, mostly murders, while some how avoiding graphic violence and sex. It's like a chick lit version of mysteries.

Date Posted: 1/5/2012 6:18 PM ET
Member Since: 7/10/2011
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Cozies are usually set in small towns too, and most have series themes that appeal to women.  I regularly read series set around catering, knitting shops, quilting circles,needlework shops, coffeehouses, antique stores, bed-and-breakfasts, tea shops, restaurants (and even the White House chef) and so on.  Many also have recipes and patterns in the books.  The other thing I like is that the heroine's life moves forward in each book.  My favorite is Diane Mott Davidsons's Goldilocks Catering series.  The sleuth is a caterer, her son gets older in each book with the associated teen angst, she is divorced from her abusive husband, finds love again with the cop that investigates her for a murder.  That seems to be a common thread as well, sleuth finds love with detective.  Close second is Cleo Coyle's Coffeehouse Mysteries that include coffee lore in the books (also a sleuth finding love with detective).  Then there is Joanna Carl whose heroine is the owner of a chocolate shop and gives interesting facts about chocolate along with recipes. 

This is a great site for exploring all about cozies - http://www.cozy-mystery.com/Cozy-Mysteries-by-Themes.html

Date Posted: 1/5/2012 9:55 PM ET
Member Since: 11/12/2011
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Holy smokes! I checked out that website and whoa there's a lot to choose from. So the cupcake murder, fudge murder, gingerbread murder, etc. books are cozy mysteries? I had a couple of those laying around the house a couple of years ago, but then gave them away to someone who was hankering for them. Now I'll know whenever we get around to mystery month.

Date Posted: 1/5/2012 10:43 PM ET
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There are also some that aren't considered cozies in the strictest sense like the Desiree Shapiro books. She is a private detective and it is set in Manhattan but there wasn't any graphic depictions of violence or sex in the ones that Ihave read.

Barb S. (okbye) - ,
Date Posted: 1/6/2012 3:42 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2011
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I asked the same question awhile ago and someone answered that they are like Murder She Wrote in book form. 

Date Posted: 1/6/2012 10:55 PM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
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Yep that's a good explanation actually.

Date Posted: 1/7/2012 9:34 AM ET
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Sorry to have hijacked the thread over to cozies!!  Back on the subject of romance, these just don't appeal to me.  But I did unknowingly get suckered into reading one, at least I think it would qualify - Second Sight by Amanda Quick.   What turned me off about this book and others like it was the unrealistic, (and I am talking really, no woman would do that unreal) sexual encounter in the first or second chapter with a stranger.  That was disapointing because I enjoy supernatural and fantasy stories (well, some of them but that is another discussion entirely!) and thought this series would be a good one.  But I never read another one in the series.

Date Posted: 1/8/2012 3:21 PM ET
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Yeah I gave up on Paranormal Romace round about the time Laurell K Hamilton wrote her heroine Anita Blake having sex with several partners of the shapeshifting persuasion and some of them in animal form. There are still occasionally PR books that catch my fancy but by and by I became an Urban Fantasy fan instead because you get the action and fantasy without the crazed sex scenes every third chapter.

Date Posted: 1/9/2012 5:39 PM ET
Member Since: 11/12/2011
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I loved the first 6 or so books of Anita Blake, then I have no idea what happened to the author. Must've been replaced by an evil-twin sister or a robot from the publishing company that they preloaded with fantasy and romance formulas. I'd still love to see what could be done with a movie / tv adaptation.

About the romance genre, I happened across charmingly misprinted copy of Deveraux's A Knight in Shining Armor. All the pages are glued in upside down. I'd have to read it from the back to the front. Do I dare count it as a romance?



Last Edited on: 1/9/12 5:44 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 1/9/2012 11:03 PM ET
Member Since: 2/12/2006
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Just FYI, these authors are also considered 'Romance authors' : Rosamund Pilcher, Michael Baron, D E Stevenson, Jan Karon, Jane Austen, Elizabeth Buchan, etc...

Barb S. (okbye) - ,
Date Posted: 1/10/2012 1:58 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2011
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I've only heard of one of those people, lol. 

My sister picked up a batch of books from Freecycle recently and there were 2 new copies of a fantasy novel where the begining, from the first blank page up to about half way through the first chapter, was upside down and backwards. I've never seen anything like it. 



Last Edited on: 1/10/12 2:02 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 1/11/2012 12:59 PM ET
Member Since: 11/12/2011
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False alarm. The book is not an upside-down misprint. Dorky me didn't notice that the dust jacket was simply on upside down. Darn. I'm genuinely dissappointed. Though, I'll probably go ahead a use it for my romance pick. It'll either be interesting or frustrating to read another Deveraux book.



Last Edited on: 1/11/12 1:00 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 1/12/2012 2:50 AM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
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Oh forgot to mention that my genre book for the month is Steamed: A Steampunk Romance by Katie McAlister.

Date Posted: 1/12/2012 8:08 PM ET
Member Since: 11/12/2011
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Steampunk? Romance? That sounds like a fun combination! Can't wait to hear about it.

Date Posted: 1/13/2012 12:04 AM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
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I'll give a full report when I'm done Dw.

Date Posted: 1/16/2012 3:02 AM ET
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OMG Steamed sucked, it sucked the life out of of me, it sucked the enjoyment out of reading and it sucked several hours out of my life that I'll never get back. I swear to all that is unholy that if I should ever meet Katie McAlister I will ask her what the eff she was thinking about when she wrote this book. The following is a reference to the heroe's penis: It's "not inhumanely large. Not like an animal, for instance." WTF? Seriously, WTF is wrong with writers who think that they need an extremely poorly written sex scene every thirty pages? Do people really like these sex scenes? Oh and it was so not steampunk. Just because you set something in a Victorian English setting and give them weird steam powered machines it doesn't make it steam punk. It's just crap hoping it can become steampunk one day. I'm actually surprised at how bad my opinion of this book is because I've read other books by this author that were really funny but this one was awful.

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