Book Reviews of The Kayla Chronicles

The Kayla Chronicles
The Kayla Chronicles
Author: Sherri Winston
ISBN-13: 9780316114301
ISBN-10: 0316114308
Publication Date: 1/1/2008
Pages: 208
Reading Level: Ages 9-12
Rating:
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 3

4.2 stars, based on 3 ratings
Publisher: Little, Brown Young Readers
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Kayla Chronicles on + 22 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I really wanted to like this book because I liked the premise: a young feminist committed to supporting her peers, helping them build self-esteem and find their girl power. Kayla is smart, athletic and articulate. How could you not love her? What bothers me most is what's not here. Kayla and her best friend spout off feminist quotes like boys cite sport stats. Pretty impressive except as a quote collector and black feminist myself, who the girls aren't quoting sticks out like static hair. Kayla wants to be a journalist, but she doesn't quote any notable black journalists like icons, Daisy Bates or Nancy Maynard. Kayla's grandmother and Rosalie's mother are both professors and feminists. If you know anything about women of color feminists, you know there are some rifts with the majority movement so it is more than strange that there isn't a single quote by notable black feminists such as Belle Hooks, Alice Walker or Audre Lorde. And the book reads as if Winston can't quite figure how to balance traditional gender roles and a modern feminist view of how women are defining themselves. Kayla is a teen so you expect her confusion but competing sub-plots suggests Winston isn't sure how to create a believable cast.
reviewed The Kayla Chronicles on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Katie Hayes for TeensReadToo.com

Aspiring journalist Kayla Dean and her best friend, Rosalie, are committed to feminism and fighting the injustices of society. Rosalie's latest plan is one that will push Kayla out of her comfort zone: Kayla will try out for their school dance team in order to prove their hypothesis that the Lady Lions only take girls with âbig, luscious breasts,â and Kayla will write an expose for the school paper.

But Kayla, a great dancer who has never quite gotten her confidence level to the point where she's comfortable performing, is in for a shock when, despite wearing an A-cup, she makes the team. Even more surprising is her realization that she likes being a Lady Lion and enjoys getting dressed up and wearing cute outfits. Now she has to find a way to reconcile her long-held beliefs with her newfound hobby - and to do so without losing her best friend.

I liked this book because it takes a fairly ordinary high school situation and makes it interesting with a distinct, funny style that reflects the main character's personality. Kayla tends to think in headlines, like âKayla Dean Infiltrates Dance Team. Senate Probes Plight of Itty-Bitties. A-cups Get Their Due!â She also invents so many of her own words and phrases that there's a âLexicon of Kayla-ismsâ at the end of the book. Kayla-isms include âblind-sexy: when someone looks so good even a blind person would go, âMmm!'â and âdis-bliss: the point at which bliss gets run over by the dump truck of disgrace.â

Kayla is a funny, memorable character, and the book's theme - "the ability to retain one's femininity while still fighting for women's rights" - is one that will resonate with readers.
reviewed The Kayla Chronicles on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Katie Hayes for TeensReadToo.com

Aspiring journalist Kayla Dean and her best friend, Rosalie, are committed to feminism and fighting the injustices of society. Rosalie's latest plan is one that will push Kayla out of her comfort zone: Kayla will try out for their school dance team in order to prove their hypothesis that the Lady Lions only take girls with "big, luscious breasts," and Kayla will write an expose for the school paper.

But Kayla, a great dancer who has never quite gotten her confidence level to the point where she's comfortable performing, is in for a shock when, despite wearing an A-cup, she makes the team. Even more surprising is her realization that she likes being a Lady Lion and enjoys getting dressed up and wearing cute outfits. Now she has to find a way to reconcile her long-held beliefs with her newfound hobby - and to do so without losing her best friend.

I liked this book because it takes a fairly ordinary high school situation and makes it interesting with a distinct, funny style that reflects the main character's personality. Kayla tends to think in headlines, like "Kayla Dean Infiltrates Dance Team. Senate Probes Plight of Itty-Bitties. A-cups Get Their Due!" She also invents so many of her own words and phrases that there's a "Lexicon of Kayla-isms" at the end of the book. Kayla-isms include "blind-sexy: when someone looks so good even a blind person would go, 'Mmm!'" and "dis-bliss: the point at which bliss gets run over by the dump truck of disgrace."

Kayla is a funny, memorable character, and the book's theme - "the ability to retain one's femininity while still fighting for women's rights" - is one that will resonate with readers.