Book Reviews of The Kids at Latimar High

The Kids at Latimar High
The Kids at Latimar High
Author: Deborah J. Copeland
ISBN-13: 9780595403813
ISBN-10: 0595403816
Publication Date: 8/16/2006
Pages: 270
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 1

4 stars, based on 1 rating
Publisher: iUniverse, Inc.
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

2 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Kids at Latimar High on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Me for TeensReadToo.com

At first glance, THE KIDS AT LATIMAR HIGH seems to be another book about the ever present high school popularity contest, or who winds up with the hottie boyfriend. On closer inspection, though, you'll begin to see that the characters of Lauren, Rosalyn, Kevin, and all of their relatives and friends are actually well-drawn and three-dimensional teens with lives of their own.

Lauren has always been the studious girl, more concerned with her grades and her job at the school paper than with her looks. Her best friend, Rosalyn, is exactly the opposite - a pretty girl who likes attention, and uses that attention to get what she wants, which is usually the boy of the moment. Somehow the two girls have managed to stay friends, surviving the ups and downs of attending Lewis Latimar High.

There's even a "Girlfriends' Do's and Don't Codes" for the girls to live by, which include such bits of wisdom as "Never size yourself up with your best friend." Which is all well and good, except that sophomore year at Latimar High has just brought about a really big problem. Lauren finds herself attracted to football star Kevin Johnson, who just happens to be on Rosalyn's unwritten list of "boys I need to make my own."

But is Rosalyn the only one breaking the friendship rules? Both girls will have to figure out which is more important in the long run - a good-looking, popular boyfriend, or a friendship that could last a lifetime.

Although THE KIDS AT LATIMAR HIGH is geared towards African-American teens, it's a great read for anyone struggling to find the difference between what is right and what is easiest. Told in alternating points of view, this is an enjoyable, engaging tale that will have you anticipating the next book in the series when you're finished.
reviewed The Kids at Latimar High on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Me for TeensReadToo.com

At first glance, THE KIDS AT LATIMAR HIGH seems to be another book about the ever present high school popularity contest, or who winds up with the hottie boyfriend. On closer inspection, though, you'll begin to see that the characters of Lauren, Rosalyn, Kevin, and all of their relatives and friends are actually well-drawn and three-dimensional teens with lives of their own.

Lauren has always been the studious girl, more concerned with her grades and her job at the school paper than with her looks. Her best friend, Rosalyn, is exactly the opposite - a pretty girl who likes attention, and uses that attention to get what she wants, which is usually the boy of the moment. Somehow the two girls have managed to stay friends, surviving the ups and downs of attending Lewis Latimar High.

There's even a "Girlfriends' Do's and Don't Codes" for the girls to live by, which include such bits of wisdom as "Never size yourself up with your best friend." Which is all well and good, except that sophomore year at Latimar High has just brought about a really big problem. Lauren finds herself attracted to football star Kevin Johnson, who just happens to be on Rosalyn's unwritten list of "boys I need to make my own."

But is Rosalyn the only one breaking the friendship rules? Both girls will have to figure out which is more important in the long run - a good-looking, popular boyfriend, or a friendship that could last a lifetime.

Although THE KIDS AT LATIMAR HIGH is geared towards African-American teens, it's a great read for anyone struggling to find the difference between what is right and what is easiest. Told in alternating points of view, this is an enjoyable, engaging tale that will have you anticipating the next book in the series when you're finished.