Book Reviews of The Killing of the Tinkers (Jack Taylor, Bk 2)

The Killing of the Tinkers (Jack Taylor, Bk 2)
The Killing of the Tinkers - Jack Taylor, Bk 2
Author: Ken Bruen
ISBN-13: 9780312339289
ISBN-10: 0312339283
Publication Date: 3/1/2005
Pages: 256
Rating:
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 24

4.2 stars, based on 24 ratings
Publisher: St. Martin's Minotaur
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

6 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Killing of the Tinkers (Jack Taylor, Bk 2) on
Helpful Score: 1
I liked The Killing of the Tinkers. I was surprised I kept reading after the first few pages. Ken Bruen is not like Reginald Hill or Ian Rankin, whose books have almost a musical flow. Bruen writes with clipped, short sentences, almost choppy. When I did get used to his style, the text sort of fell into a pace of its own. There is a story line. There are several dead bodies. There are many interesting characters. The Washington Post called this book "grimly hilarious and gloriously Irish." Since the main character, Jack Taylor, is an alcoholic drug user determined to ruin his life and take down anyone who cares about him; I say with all Southern sincerity, "Bless his heart!" I'll be ready for the third installment in a month or two.
reviewed The Killing of the Tinkers (Jack Taylor, Bk 2) on + 636 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I must admit that I enjoyed this book much more than _Priest_. This one was much more about the plot - and while the characters were still strong, it made for a much better book, albeit less humourous, than _Priest_. This out-of-order reading is still driving me nuts though! [This is the 2nd book in the Jack Taylor series]
reviewed The Killing of the Tinkers (Jack Taylor, Bk 2) on + 107 more book reviews
There's no one like Bruen!! This is poetry masquarading as prose and the world of literature is better for it. Jack Taylor is as self-destructive and intospective as ever, but with a cutting wit that keeps us rooting for him in spite of everything.
reviewed The Killing of the Tinkers (Jack Taylor, Bk 2) on + 43 more book reviews
Ken Bruen books are very hard to find. This is one of his best. I'm lucky I have severl of them and will be listingthem soon.
From Publishers Weekly

With his second Jack Taylor crime novel (after 2003's The Guards), Irish author Bruen confirms his rightful place among the finest noir stylists of his generation. A year after the newly sober Jack Taylor left Galway to start a new life in London, the former member of the Gardai Siochana (the Irish police) returns home, a failed marriage behind him. The PI is sinking back into alcoholic oblivion when an Irish Gypsy, Sweeper, approaches Jack for help in solving the murders of a number of young men in his clan. The Guards aren't interested, since, after all, "it's only tinkers... and everyone knows, they're always killing each other." The quintessential outsider himself, Jack empathizes with the roaming Gypsies and feels comfortable in their company. Enlisting the aid of Keegan, a burly cop friend from London, Jack sets about investigating the killings, while at the same time he struggles to keep his own personal demons under control. Bruen's spare, lean style reads like prose poetry. Indeed, beneath the surface of Jack's jaded, self-destructiveness is a romantic with a poet's sensibilities. An autodidact, Jack continually references his literary heroes, from Chester Himes to Thomas Merton. Next to his bottle of Jameson is always a book to help him through the hard times: "I needed Merton and a pint. Not necessarily in that order." This is a remarkable book from a singular talent.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


From Booklist

Jack Taylor, who left town at the end of The Guards [BKL D 15 02], is back in Galway. Struggling with drink, drugs, and a thrift-store wardrobe, he's still staggering from a welcome-back hangover when he's offered a job. Someone is murdering young tinkers, and the police are refusing to investigate; the head of the tinker clan wants answers. Taylor--also a bookworm and a pop-culture sponge--isn't just an antihero, he's an antidetective who spends far more time committing crimes against his liver than following leads. The supporting cast (including a character from The White Trilogy [BKL F 1 03]) moves the action forward while Taylor gets puking drunk, screws up his relationships, and goes days on end without getting to work. The payoff, for some readers, is Taylor's worldview. He may be a drunken shambles, but his wry humor, regret, and sense of impending mortality--often expressed in lines that are like aphorisms of the doomed--keep readers coming along. Crime solving aside, this is a strong piece of crime writing. Keir Graff
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
reviewed The Killing of the Tinkers (Jack Taylor, Bk 2) on + 468 more book reviews
Another winner from Bruen. I love his writing and the character of former garda Jack Taylor. I only have 2 more books to read until I'm current with the series, and I'm not too happy that I'll have to wait awhile for another installment. Highly recommend.
reviewed The Killing of the Tinkers (Jack Taylor, Bk 2) on + 2 more book reviews
I would have to agree with the Portsmouth Herald who reviewed "The story is dark and the style is elegant, smooth, spare, and silky as the best aged Irish whiskey. Wharp, swift, and blackly comic.