Book Reviews of The Kin

The Kin
The Kin
Author: Peter Dickinson
ISBN-13: 9780142501207
ISBN-10: 0142501204
Publication Date: 6/9/2003
Pages: 640
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 13

3.7 stars, based on 13 ratings
Publisher: Puffin
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

4 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Kin on + 593 more book reviews
This was a great read.
reviewed The Kin on + 4 more book reviews
200,000 years ago, 6 children are cut off from their family group, the Moonhawk Kin, when they're driven from their home by violent strangers. Now, they're alone & living by their wits and limited experience. --that's from the back of the book. This author did a lot of research, and it is a good book. I enjoyed it & read it aloud to my 11year old.
reviewed The Kin on + 2 more book reviews
A fascinating and detailed look into the development of humans and pre-humans from four different voices. This volume includes all four "stories" which I believe were originally published separately and explores life on the brink of humanity two hundred thousand years ago. While the plot of the novel is more fantasy, than science fiction, Dickinson has done an enormous amount of research for this book and "fleshes" out scientific theories about language development, socialization, and other evolutionary processes.
reviewed The Kin on + 201 more book reviews
Set in Africa, when homo sapiens was first developing language, this YA novel follows a group of children trying to survive on their own in a setting of desert, savannah and marsh. In their nomadic travels they meet other human groups, some of whom have not yet achieved language, and others who live by attacking other humans. They also survive encounters with lions, snakes and crocodiles. Lots of adventure, requiring a lot of problem-solving.

Inevitably, it invites comparison to Jean Auel's adult series, which is set in Europe at a later time in pre-history. I feel this book is much more realistic - after all, in Auel's books the same woman domesticates a wolf and a horse and discovers how to use flint to start a fire!

Recommended for kids and grownups. Warning: it is very long, about 600 pages.