Discussion Forums - Christian Book Recommendations

Topic: Kindle Lending Library questions

Club rule - Please, if you cannot be courteous and respectful, do not post in this forum.
  Unlock Forum posting with Annual Membership.
Subject: Kindle Lending Library questions
Date Posted: 10/18/2012 12:26 PM ET
Member Since: 9/18/2005
Posts: 6,963
Back To Top

We just recently go Amazon Prime, which comes with the Lending Library, but other than knowing I get it for 2 weeks, I know nothing about it.  I would like to understand how to find the books I'm wanting, if I have to ask permission to borrow a book, etc.  It appears that if it says "free for Prime" that it is a LL book?  and if I just "purchase" it I am borrowing it? 

Also, is there a limit to how many I can borrow? And are my books available to lend?  I have a LOT of books on my devices and wouldn't mind lending them, but does that mean I don't get them back?  HELP!  LOL

 

I'm asking here, because I just want the basic help from people who will be nice to me....I don't always like the CMT.  LOL



Last Edited on: 10/18/12 12:27 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 10/20/2012 10:43 PM ET
Member Since: 1/28/2009
Posts: 15,093
Back To Top

You may have already found your answers but I just noticed this topic.  I'm not a Prime member any longer but some of this might help.

Don't know for sure about the Lending Library part but I get a good many of the free books offered for Kindle and then buy some too.

I have loaned a few of them and they are returned to you.  The person you loan to gets them for the two week period.

As far as knowing which ones you can loan - you can go to each book you have for your Kindle and on the right hand side you have an action button. If you click on it, it will show several options for that book and if it can be loaned, it will show an option for Loan this title.  There might be an easier way but I haven't taken the time to find one.

 

Date Posted: 10/21/2012 8:51 AM ET
Member Since: 12/14/2009
Posts: 263
Back To Top

I'm not a Prime member, but here's what I know.

 

What Cynthia says about lending is true.  However, that is not a Prime feature and is not related to the Kindle Lending Library, that is something everyone can do.  I'll add that Amazon gives the person you lent the book to 7 days to accept and then 14 days to read.  During that time you will not have access to your book, unless they manually return it before the time period ends.  There are websites dedicated to matching people who want to lend books with people who want to borrow books.  However, like I said this feature is not related to Prime.

 

From what I know of the Kindle Lending Library, you get to borrow 1 book per month and you can keep it as long as you like.  However, you cannot borrow another book until you return that one and if you don't borrow a book on a particular month you cannot use it on another (for example, if you don't borrow a book in November, you can't borrow 2 in December).  You need to have a Kindle and borrow directly from the Kindle (you can't use the apps to read the books).  

 

 

Date Posted: 10/23/2012 2:50 PM ET
Member Since: 9/18/2005
Posts: 6,963
Back To Top

Hmm...well, in the Prime Benefits area it speak of this being a Prime perk specifically. 

And I don't have an actual Kindle (yet)...DH is talking of getting me one.  Trying to figure out if I want the Paperwhite or not. 

 

Date Posted: 10/23/2012 6:36 PM ET
Member Since: 12/14/2009
Posts: 263
Back To Top

We're talking about 2 different things here: the Kindle Lending Library and ebook lending.

 

The Kindle Lending Library is a Prime only perk.  But what that consists of is borrowing 1 book per month for as long as you like from Amazon.  It requires having a Kindle.

 

Ebook lending is open to everyone (as long as the publisher chooses to make the book lendable).  This works between people, does not require having a Kindle, and you can borrow as many books as you can read at the same time.  You can also lend books to anyone you want (although you can only lend the book one time).  This is NOT part of the Kindle Lending Library.  

 

Maybe an example will help.  I took a little peek in your wishlist and I'm going to use three of those books to illustrate what I mean.

 

1- Belonging by Robin Lee Hatcher- If you look at the Amazon page you'll notice that it is NOT lendable and it is NOT part of the Kindle Lending Library.  Therefore, you cannot borrow it from Amazon as part of the Kindle Lending Library, and you cannot borrow it from someone else (or lend it to someone else if you had it).  

2- The Silent Governess by Julie Klassen- This book IS lendable, but it is NOT part of the Kindle Lending Library.  Therefore, you cannot borrow it from Amazon as part of the Kindle Lending Library, but you could borrow it from someone who had it or you could lend it to someone if your purchased it.  If you borrowed it from someone you would have 7 days to accept the book and then 14 days to read the book.

3- Disaster Status by Candance Calvert- This book IS lendable and IS part of the Kindle Lending Library.  Therefore, you could borrow it from Amazon as part of the Kindle Lending Library (but only after you get a Kindle) and you could keep it as long as you want (but you cannot borrow another book until you return this one, and you can only borrow one book a month).  You could also borrow it from someone who has it, in which case you would have 7 days to accept and 14 days to read. 

 

Personally, I really like the ebook lending feature.  I've borrowed many books that sounded interesting but I didn't want to buy or request from PBS.  The best part is it's free, so I don't spend money or credits and I get to read the books.  Some of them I've been glad that I didn't spend the money or credits to get them.

As I mentioned, I'm not a prime member, but I don't think the Kindle Lending Library is that great of a perk because you can only get 1 book per month.  It's better than nothing, of course, but unless you're a very slow reader, or very busy with little time for reading, you'll probably spend a lot of time waiting until you can borrow the next book (at least that's how I'd be)

 

I hope I didn't end up confusing you more.

Date Posted: 10/26/2012 2:16 PM ET
Member Since: 9/18/2005
Posts: 6,963
Back To Top

Okay, I think I understand....you didn't confuse me more.  But what I am having a hard time finding is the lendable books.  I get scenario 1 and 3 above, but I am not seeing where a book is lendable.  I'm logged in to Amazon and everything and I feel like I'm just missing something obvious.  LOL I would likely do this route more often, like you, if I could find it! 

Date Posted: 10/26/2012 2:47 PM ET
Member Since: 9/18/2005
Posts: 6,963
Back To Top

I'm really not trying to be dense, Nayda, and I appreciate your help!

Date Posted: 10/30/2012 3:18 PM ET
Member Since: 3/8/2009
Posts: 6,035
Back To Top

Amanda, using Nayda's example from above, go the Kindle store on Amazon.com and search for The Silent Governess.  Scroll wwwaaaayyyy down the page to the Product Details section. Near the bottom of the list of details, it says "Lending: Enabled".  So that means it is available for the person-to-person ebook lending program.  If it were not available for that program, it would say "Disabled".

Date Posted: 10/30/2012 10:44 PM ET
Member Since: 12/14/2009
Posts: 263
Back To Top

Also, if you have bought a book that you can lend you will see this banner in the product page.  If you already lent it, or it's not lending enabled, the "Loan this book to anyone you choose" option will not appear. 

 

Instant Order Update for . You purchased this item on January 1, 2011. View this order.
Loan this book to anyone you choose.
Date Posted: 11/1/2012 3:44 PM ET
Member Since: 9/18/2005
Posts: 6,963
Back To Top

DING! DING! DING!!   LOL  Thanks....I had never noticed either of those before.  That's awesome.  I will certainly start looking for that now in the future.  :)

Date Posted: 11/1/2012 3:49 PM ET
Member Since: 9/18/2005
Posts: 6,963
Back To Top

Okay, one more question:  when I see a book that is "lendable" how do I go about getting it from someone?  Do you have to find someone to be friends with first and then have them lend it to you?

Date Posted: 11/4/2012 9:13 AM ET
Member Since: 12/14/2009
Posts: 263
Back To Top

Well, when Barnes and Noble (and later Amazon) made the lending feature, they probably meant it for you to lend books and borrow books from your friends.

However, I dont personally know anyone you reads the same kind of thing I do.  And Im obviously not alone in that.

Therefore, websites have been created to pair people so they can lend books to each other.  I have accounts in about 6 of them, but the ones Ive actually borrowed and lent in are:

1- Lendle

2- BookLending

3- eBook Fling

 

Each one has their pros and cons.  

Lendle has the best variety and they pay you a few cents to lend a book.  However, the website is painfully slow and chances of lending a book if it has many copies in the system are really low.  You need to have books listed in order to be able to borrow, but you dont have to actually lend them.  You could list hundreds of books and never lend one and you can still borrow books.  If the book is not available, when you request it the book goes to a kind of wishlist.  Similar to PBS, the first person who requests get the first spot, the second person the second, and so on.  However, you cannot put books on hold unless you pay the $25 patron fee.

BookLending does not have as much variety as Lendle.  It does not tell you if a book is available in the system.  You request it and it goes into a books I want list.  They have a formula to determine who gets books faster, based on lending.  However, I'm not sure exactly how the formula works and if you're lending and more than one person has requested the book you get to choose.  Therefore, you might be waiting a long time for really popular books.  This website only lets you borrow 3 books in a given week, but I've never reached that cap.  You don't have to lend to borrow, but your wait times will be longer if you don't lend (although I lend a bunch of books at one time and it did not make me get more books, so like I said before, I don't know how their formula works).

eBookFling works on a credit system.  You get a credit for each book lent, which you can then use to request a book you like.  Like Lendle, it tells you if a book is available in the system.  It also has a wish list feature for books that are not available.  However, unlike Lendle, there's no order in the wishlist.  When a book becomes available, an email is sent to everyone who has the book on the wishlist and the first one to click on the link gets the book.  Therefore, if you don't live on your computer you will be waiting a long time  for popular books.  eBookfling's system also has the benefit that it protects your email address.  In order to borrow a book the other person has to have your email address so Amazon can send you an email with the link tothe book.  However, eBookfling works it so that the other person gets a dummy ebookfling address and then you retrieve your book from the website.  Therefore, the other person never sees your address.