Book Reviews of The King's Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy

The King's Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy
The King's Speech How One Man Saved the British Monarchy
Author: Peter Conradi, Mark Logue
ISBN-13: 9781402786761
ISBN-10: 140278676X
Publication Date: 11/26/2010
Pages: 242
Rating:
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 31

3.9 stars, based on 31 ratings
Publisher: Sterling
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The King's Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy on + 242 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Written by Lionel Logue's grandson, this semi-biography tells more about the background of Logue and his personal experiences. It also confirms much of the emotional underpinnings that you might otherwise have missed. Logue is seen as much more in awe of the monarchy; more is given on the relationship between George and his brother. Being a factual account, it does not have the heartlifting drama of the film, or Colin Firth's wonderful presence; but it does explain more of the physical side of the speech therapy and includes a lot of interesting detail not in in the film version. An interesting adjunct to the film.
reviewed The King's Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy on + 7 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Interesting book which emphasizes the relationship between the teacher and the King more in
depth. You learn much more about the teacher than was shared in the movie version.
reviewed The King's Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy on + 1165 more book reviews
Although it has the same title as the movie, the book has a very different slant. It also continues to the death of both the King and Logue.

While not as dramatic as the movie it provides more history about the British monarchy at that time and the science of speech therapy than does the movie.

Another difference of the book to the movie is directly addressed by Logue's grandson in the book. This is Logue's almost fawning manner to the royal family. But then we are "looking at" the 1930s-40s and not today, when the British Royals do things which are embarrassing to themselves, their family and their country. Although, in this book we once again learn what a weak person Edward was. The British Empire should thank God he abdicated and was not the king during World War II.

One interesting bit of trivia I discovered was the name of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the chief religious of the Church of England, during this period---Cosmo Lang. Not something I would have expected, and almost funny. Could you imagine a Pope Cosmo of the Catholic Church?

Another interesting piece of trivia is the doctor of King George V, the Duke's father, administered a lethal dosage of cocaine and morphine to end the King's pain and his life. This was admitted in the doctor's papers almost 50 years after the fact.