Book Reviews of The Lives of John Lennon

The Lives of John Lennon
The Lives of John Lennon
Author: Albert Goldman
ISBN-13: 9780553280579
ISBN-10: 0553280570
Publication Date: 6/1/1989
Pages: 896
Edition: Reprint
Rating:
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 10

3.7 stars, based on 10 ratings
Publisher: Bantam
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

4 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Lives of John Lennon on + 55 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 5
Any John Lennon fan knows that there are many facets to the man who wrote "Give Peace a Chance" and "All You Need is Love," including a mean streak and a propensity for violence. However, in "The Lives of John Lennon" so much of the story is Goldman's armchair psychology. The author puts a negative slant on every aspect of John's life. It is difficult to know how much is fact and how much is made up in the mind of the author.
reviewed The Lives of John Lennon on + 15 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
One of the worst books ever written on John Lennon. Contradictions throughout the book and outright lies.
reviewed The Lives of John Lennon on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
An extensive review of John's life, but I liked what I read regarding this book in 'The Beatles'biography by Bob Spitz - "a controversial and discredited biography...I found it unreadable and irresponsible...". I'm sure there's truth mixed in the pages of this book, but information that stated that Lennon had multiple personality disorder, was developmentally /physically afflicted and uncoordinated (excuse me, wasn't he quite a guitarist...) was hard to swallow. Lennon was certainly a complicated person, but this book dealt way too much with his faults, real, imagined, or somewhere in-between. There are many more balanced books out there that don't try to pulverize his life.
reviewed The Lives of John Lennon on + 55 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Any John Lennon fan knows that there are many facets to the man who wrote "Give Peace a Chance" and "All You Need is Love," including a mean streak and a propensity for violence. However, in "The Lives of John Lennon" so much of the story is Goldman's armchair psychology. The author puts a negative slant on every aspect of John's life. It is difficult to know how much is fact and how much is made up in the mind of the author.