Book Reviews of The Long Road Home

The Long Road Home
The Long Road Home
Author: Danielle Steel
ISBN-13: 9780385319560
ISBN-10: 0385319568
Publication Date: 4/1/1998
Pages: 408
Rating:
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
 71

3.5 stars, based on 71 ratings
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

41 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

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Helpful Score: 2
There are just too many big themes in this book: suicide, child abuse, severe depression, parental abandonment - just to name a few. What saves this book in my opinion is the realism of the child abuse and the evil of the parents. Ms. Steel must have done her research either first hand or through a knowledgeable person to be able to depict abuse and rotten parents so realistically. (I have worked in the field...) However, the mother is depicted as over the top; quite histrionic and sadistic. Why no one around her in her circle of friends noticed something was wrong with this woman is beyond me. The father, in his silence, is much more typical and realistic. Also, the tragic suicide in this story doesn't make sense given the character of the person who kills himself. Though these incongruities provide a very flawed novel I commend Ms. Steel for bringing the issue of severe child abuse, even among the upper class, into the forefront. If you can overlook the unbelievable parts of the novel, this turned out to be a good read.
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Helpful Score: 1
Another great one from Danielle Steel!
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Helpful Score: 1
A heart touching story of an abused child's broken world and her courageus struggle to free herself from the past.
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Scandal, betrayal and treachery do little to animate this dreary saga from the prolific Steel (The Ghost). By the time she's six, Gabriella Harrison has known nothing but torture at the hands of her battering mother, Eloise, a socialite who hates children?especially her own. Gabbie's alcoholic father is incapable of dealing with the madness that rules the mansion and soon escapes with another woman. Then Eloise decides she's tired of mothering and abandons 10-year-old Gabbie at St. Matthew's convent. Gabbie blossoms at the nunnery, where she finds unconditional love from the sisters, a talent for writing and, later, illicit passion in the arms of a priest. When discovered, the affair leads to the priest's suicide and Gabbie's eviction from the convent. Always one to make lemonade of life's lemons, however, Gabbie assuages her grief with new friends, a new lover and her burgeoning talent as a writer. Still, tragedy tails her like a lost puppy, and her monstrous mother casts a long shadow over her triumphs. Steel's latest attempt at a redemption story falls flat because of repetitious prose and two-dimensional characters. The inevitable happy ending, when it finally arrives, can't make up for a plodding narrative lacking in any real suspense.
PUBLISHERS WEEKLY REVIEW
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My FAVORITE Danielle Steel book, ever!! Not a sappy love story like most of hers...this one is very dramatic, and I could'nt put it down!
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A light summer read by Danielle Steel in her typical fashion. I wasn't overly impressed but it did keep me turning the pages.
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I have not read Danielle Steel since college, when I thought it was the greatest literary work around LOL, but this .25 pickup at a library sale was sitting on my TBR forever, it was wonderful. It sucked you in completely and just when you think that the heroine can take no more, more is thrust upon her. I really enjoyed this one, a great book and completely engrossed me, finished it in two partial days!!!
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With profound insight, Danielle Steel has created a ivid portrait of an abused child's broken world, and the courage necessary to face it and free herself from the past. A work of daring and compassion, a tale of healing that will shock and touch and move you to your ver soul, it exposes the terror of child abuse, and opens the door on a subject that affects us all. The Long Road Home is more than riveting fiction. It is an inspiration to us all. A work of courage, hope, and love.
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This story was brilliantly written and moved me to tears. I cried all the way through it, but would read it again.
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a very good book
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a story of the dark side of childhood and one woman's unbreakable spirit.
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This is not one of Danielle Steel's best, but it does hold your interest. It does end happily even though there are many passages of child abuse.
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With profound insight, Danielle Steel has created a vivid portrait of an abused child's broken world, and the courage necessary to face it and free herself from the past. A work of daring and compassion, a tale of healing that will shock and touch and move you to your very soul, it exposes the terror of child abuse, and opens the doors on a subject that affects us all. It is an inspiration to us all. A work of courage, hope, and love.
This book is very hard to put down. To me, it was one of the best I have ever read.
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This book was incredible. I could not put it down!
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Good story by Steel, enjoy her writing.
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I liked it. It was a bit different than Danielle Steele's past books. The beginning really made me upset and this poor girl just can't seem to catch a break.
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Enjoyed this book.
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This was a good book by ds, not as drawn out as some. Typical ds, cozy and familiar like a good pair of socks and a warm blanket
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Sort of a hard read - it's about child abuse. But like any Danielle Steel book, it's a woman that overcomes hardship and has a happy ever after ending.
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Gabriella at age seven that she is to blame for her mother's rage and grows up in a convent where her mother leaves her as she grows into womenhood and a youn priest comes into her life. Again feeling guilty she moves to N.Y. where finally she fins forgivness and healing
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At age 6, our heroine, lovely Gabriella Harrison, a rich kid on Manhattan's Upper East Side, "looked startled much of the time, like an angel who had fallen to earth, and had not known what to expect here." What Gabriella gets is a mother like Lucifer and a father who slips out to sleep with Italian prostitutes while Mrs. Harrison is busy breaking Gabriella's spirit--and sometimes her bones. Gabby's tormentor makes the real-life moms in Mommie Dearest and Mommy Dressing look sweet.
Gabriella gets a better break when her parents divorce and dump her in a convent. She meets a sensitive, older man with a deep, dark secret, and pretty soon they've got some steamy erotic secrets in common.

Unfortunately, he's a priest, and troubles erupt that are too much for any confessional to contain. Soon Gabriella is living on the East Side again, only this time in Mrs. Boslicki's boarding house, where the richness in people's hearts makes up for their relative material poverty. A kindly, retired Harvard English professor resembling Einstein nags her into trying her hand and purging her demons as a writer. "When I say you have talent, young lady, I mean it," says Professor Thomas. "They didn't hire me at Harvard to grow bananas." Will Gabriella have the courage to confront her talent? Can she face her past at last, conquer the future, and land a man to share it?
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Danielle Steel writes one of her best novels about a young girl named Gabriella who is physically abused while growing up. Even though she is from a wealthy family, her mother continuously beats her for the smallest things. He father, a weak man, allows it to happen. Through a series of events, Gabriella is abandoned by her family and is raised in a convent by loving and supportive nuns. She is relieved that she does not have to interact with her mother. Although she is physically safe, she is lonely and empty. As she grows into a young woman, she discovers love and begins to enjoy life. In the end, she is able to restore healing and wholeness from her childhood racked with lies and abuse.
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I really loved this book. I think it was Danielle Steele's best book ever. It was a real tear jerker. It seemed like it came from personal experience and only an abused child could give that much detail. Excellent story but very sad.
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Great romance story. Wonderful read.
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A story of the dark side of childhood and one woman's unbreakable spirit. This was a main selection of The Literary Guild and The Doubleday Book Club.
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I am not a Danielle Steel fan, but this was good.
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This book was SO good. The storyline, child abuse, is a hard one to tackle but somehow Ms. Steel managed to create a likeable protagonist that the reader roots for. After all her struggles, there is triumph in the end. It is very much worth your time.
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A story of the dark side of childhood and one woman's unbreakable spirit.
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Steel's fans should be pleased with this story that reveals the power of forgiveness, the shame of child abuse, and the spirit of survival.
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Gabbie is the brunt of her mother's rage and thinks it's her fault because she's bad. Her father does nothing to protect her. At ten she is abandoned at a convent in NYC and lives there for ten years before disgrace leads to living on her own in the city. A great story showing child abuse and how the victim found a way to overcome her past. I thought this was a great book.
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At seven, Gabriella Harrison believes, as she is told, that she is to blame for her mother's rage--and her father's failure to protect her. Her world is a confusing blend of terror, betrayal, and pain, where there is no safeguard and no safe haven to run to. Her only escape is through the stories she writes. But Gabriella is given her first reprieve when her mother abandons her to a convent. There, amid the quiet safety and hushed rituals of the nuns, Gabriella grows into womanhood. Then a young priest comes into her life.

Father Joe Connors never questioned his vocation until Gabriella entered the confessional. Confession leads to friendship. And friendship grows dangerously into love. Like Gabriella, Joe is haunted by his childhood. With her, he takes the first steps toward healing. But their relationship puts challenges before them that can only lead to disaster.

Exiled and disgraced, Gabriella struggles to survive on her own in New York. She seeks healing and escape through her writing, but is again betrayed by someone she trusts. Brought to the edge of despair, she manages to find hope. On a pilgrimage destined to bring her face-to-face with those who sought to destroy her, she finds forgiveness, freedom from guilt, and healing from abuse.
reviewed The Long Road Home on + 711 more book reviews
With profound insight, Steel has created a vivid portrait of an abused child's broken world, and the courage necessary to fact it and free herself from the past. A work of daring and compassion, it exposes the terror of child abuse, and opens the doors on a subject that affect us all. It is a work of hope and courage.
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Good story, typical Steel
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This is a story about the life of a child who is physically abused. It tells about the repeated attacks she endures and the heartbreaking treatment she receives. It goes on to tell of the events happening in her life after being left by her mother. It is heartbreaking. May you realize the need to intercede if you know of a child who is in danger.
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no dust jacket on my book
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Bestselling novelist Danielle Steel takes us on a harrowing journey into the heart of America's hidden shame in a novel that explores the power of forgiveness, the dark side of childhood, and one woman's unbreakable spirit.

From her secret perch at the top of the stairs, Gabriella Harrison watches the guests arrive at her parents' lavish Manhattan townhouse. At seven, she knows she is an intruder in her parents' party, in her parents' life. But she can't resist the magic. Later, she waits for the click, click, click of her mother's high heels, the angry words, and the pain that will follow. Gabriella already knows to hide her bruises, certain she is to blame for her mother's rage--and her father's failure to protect her. Her world is a confusing blend of terror, betrayal, and pain. Her parents' aristocratic world is no safeguard against the abuse that knows no boundaries, respects no person, no economic lines. Gabriella knows that, try as she might, there is no safe place for her to hide.

Even as a child, her only escape is through the stories she writes. Only writing can dull the pain of her lonely world. And when her parents' marriage collapses, Gabriella is given her first reprieve, as her father disappears, and then her mother abandons her to a convent. There, Gabriella's battered body and soul begin to mend. Amid the quiet safety and hushed rituals of the nuns, Gabriella grows into womanhood in a safe, peaceful world. Then a young priest comes into her life.

Father Joe Connors never questioned his vocation until Gabriella entered the confessional and shared her soul. Confession leads to friendship. And friendship grows dangerously into love. Like Gabriella, Joe is haunted by the pain of his childhood, consumed by guilt over a family tragedy, for which he blames himself. With Gabriella, Joe takes the first steps toward healing. But their relationship leads to tragedy as Joe must choose between the priesthood and Gabriella, and life in the real world where he fears he does not belong, and cannot cope.

Exiled and disgraced, and nearly destroyed, Gabriella struggles to survive on her own in New York. There she seeks healing and escape through her writing again, this time as an adult, and her life as a writer begins. But just when she thinks she is beyond hurt, Gabriella is once again betrayed by someone she trusts. Brought to the edge of despair, physically attacked beyond recognition and belief, haunted by abuse in her present and her past, she nonetheless manages to find hope again, and the courage to face the past. On a pilgrimage destined to bring her face-to-face with those who sought to destroy her in her early life, she finds forgiveness, freedom from guilt, and healing from abuse. When Gabriella faces what was done to her, and why, she herself is free at last.

With profound insight, Danielle Steel has created a vivid portrait of an abused child's broken world, and the courage necessary to face it and free herself from the past. A work of daring and compassion, a tale of healing that will shock and touch and move you to your very soul, it exposes the terror of child abuse, and opens the doors on a subject that affects us all. The Long Road Home is more than riveting fiction. It is an inspiration to us all. A work of courage, hope, and love.
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it was ok
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From book cover:
At seven, Gabriella Harrison believes, as she is told that she is to blame for her mother's rage - and her father's failure to protect her. Her world is a confusing blend of terror, betrayal, and pain, where there is no safeguard and no safe haven to run to. Her only escape is through the stories she writes. But Gabriella is given her first reprieve when her mother abandons her to a convent. There, amid the quiet safety and hushed rituals of the nuns, Gabriella grows into womanhood. Then a young priest comes into her life.
Father Joe Connors never questioned his vocation until Gabriella entered the confessional. Confession leads to friendship. And friendship grows dangerously into love. Like Gabriella, Joe is haunted by his childhood. With her, he takes the first steps toward healing. But their relationship puts challenges before them that can only lead to disaster.
Exiled and disgraced, Gabriella struggles to survive on her own in New York. She seeks healing and escape through her writing, but is again betrayed by someone she trusts. Brought to the edge of despair, she manages to find hope. On a pilgrimage destined to bring her face-to-face with those who sought to destroy her, she finds forgiveness, freedom from guilt, and healing from abuse.
reviewed The Long Road Home on + 75 more book reviews
From her secret perch at the top of the stairs, seven-year-old Gabriella Harriman watches the guests arrive at her parents' lavish Manhattan townhouse. Later, she waits for the click, click, click of her mother's high heels, the angry words, and the pain that will follow. Even as a child, her only escape is through the stories she writes. When her parents' marriage collapses, Gabriella is given her first reprieve, as her father disappears, and her mother sends her to a convent. There, Gabriella's battered body and soul begin to mend, and she finds love in the arms of a young priest. But the relationship leads to tragedy when Father Joe must choose between the priesthood and Gabriella. Exiled and disgraced, Gabriella struggles to survive on her own in New York. Again, she seeks healing and escape through her writing. On a pilgrimage destined to bring her face-to-face with those who sought to destroy her in her early life, she finds forgiveness, freedom from guilt, and healing from abuse. When Gabriella faces what was done to her, and why, she herself is free at last.
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Book is in great condition but cover a little tattered.
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used but in good shape