Book Reviews of Lucy

Lucy
Lucy
Author: Ellen Feldman
ISBN-13: 9780393325102
ISBN-10: 0393325105
Publication Date: 1/2004
Pages: 304
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 38

3.8 stars, based on 38 ratings
Publisher: W. W. Norton Company
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

8 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Lucy on + 3 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Nice novelized version of the affair between FDR and Lucy Mercer. Don't take if for fact, however.
reviewed Lucy on + 2 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Based on recently discovered materials and incorporating a never-before published footnote to the affair between FDR and Lucy Mercer, this book is a remarkably sensitive insight into the private lives behind a public marriage.
reviewed Lucy on + 1111 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
In this fictionalized portrayal of FDR's affair with Lucy Mercer, Lucy does not come across to me as a likable person. She is a disturbing blend of naivete and callousness, both selfish and arrogant in her conviction that she can give Roosevelt what Eleanor cannot.
reviewed Lucy on + 167 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
An unknown small piece of history, very interesting reading.
reviewed Lucy on
Interesting and entertaining book. Gave me a different view of FDR and Eleanor.
reviewed Lucy on + 8 more book reviews
A beautiful love story!!
reviewed Lucy on + 379 more book reviews
While this book was interesting, I couldn't help but be really annoyed at the main character, Lucy. I could not feel sorry for her. She was fooling' around with another woman's husband. Didn't shed any tears for FDR, either. What is it with powerful men that makes them think they can hop into bed with whatever woman they fancy??? All in all, okay.
reviewed Lucy on + 6 more book reviews
(From the back cover) On the Eve of World War I, Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin Delano Roosevelt, fiercely ambitious and still untouched by polio, fell in love with his wife's social secretary, Lucy Mercer. When Eleanor stumbled onto evidence of the affair, divorce was discussed, but honor and ambition won out. Franklin promised he would never see Lucy again.

Ellen Feldman's novel brings sympathy and insight to bear on the connection between these three compelling characters. When Franklinn and Lucy did meet again, it was across the divide of his illness and political ascendancy, her marriage and widowhood. As he prepared to run for an unprecedented third term and lead America into another World War, he turned to Lucy for the warmth and unconditional approval Eleanor was unable to give.

Based on recently discovered materials and incorporation a never-before published footnote to the affair, Lucy is a remarkably sensitive insight into the private lives behind a public marriage.