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Topic: It's May the Lusty Month of May what are you reading?

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Subject: It's May the Lusty Month of May what are you reading?
Date Posted: 5/1/2011 8:40 AM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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I am reading Elizabeth Peters The Deeds of the Disturber.



Last Edited on: 5/1/11 8:40 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 5/1/2011 9:00 AM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
Posts: 4,035
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Halfway through Vienna Waltz. Should finish that off today and then I've got on ILL on the hold shelf, Fortune's Wheel by Rhoda Edwards. R3 and Anne Neville I believe. A few of us are buddying it over at Goodreads.

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 9:06 AM ET
Member Since: 5/19/2007
Posts: 4,709
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I'm halfway through Shadows & Strongholds now.  Love. Pure love.  I think by starting us with Brunin and Hawise as children, we go much deeper into their psyches and can understand their motivations, especially Brunin's.  I love that!  

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 9:15 AM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
Posts: 4,035
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Vicky, I couldn't agree more and it really builds a stronger emotional connection with the pair. IMO Chadwick is very good at portraying children, I loved what she did with William Marshal in A Place Beyond Courage. She can bring them out into the story, but they aren't over bearing or annoying either. They are reall.

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 9:48 AM ET
Member Since: 6/1/2007
Posts: 1,891
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Elizabeth I by Margaret George

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 11:23 AM ET
Member Since: 7/22/2009
Posts: 2,617
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Holly (and others who are reading, have read, or thinking about reading George's Elizabeth I): Thought you might be interested in Diana Gabaldon's review of the book published in the Washington Post a couple days ago. Here's the link: Gabaldon's Review of Elizabeth I.  

(If this link doesn't work, let me know -- it works on my computer but that might be because we're online Post subscribers.)

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 11:39 AM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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The link works for me Deb.  I doubt I will be reading George's Elizabeth.  Especially after reading that I only have enough time left to read a few thousand books.  I am really very tired of the Tudor period.  Goes back to eating chocolate.cheeky

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 11:56 AM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
Posts: 4,035
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I'm with Jerelyn. The book landed on my hold shelf but I just couldn't bear to start a book of that size, plus being one more Tudor novel.  I'll go back to eating chocolate now as well.

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 12:28 PM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2008
Posts: 10,207
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Hey Letty - I see by the title of this month's thread that you must have read Jeri Westerson's Newsletter! Good thinking!

Yes the Tudors have become "Too Dour"  for me and that's why I really, really think the Genghis book was a great change! After I make a dent in the bazillion books I have to read, I think that will be a good choice for awhile - Genghis, Attila, the Russians, etc. Lots more to learn about what went on in the world besides Great Britain! Also, that's why I love the historical mysteries - they tell you a bit about the times and places but through the eyes of more common people! smiley

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 12:35 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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Jeanne,  I will have to check out JW's  newsletter,  I was thinking of that song from Camelot.  ;p

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 3:37 PM ET
Member Since: 5/31/2009
Posts: 2,857
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Reading The Grass Crown by Colleen McCullough for Books set in ancient Rome, Greece, or Egypt.

Finished The Cigar Maker by Mark Carlos McGinty, a book that I almost didn't order because of the topic.  It is HF but not a challenge book.   And, it's a pretty good one.  This is the story of a man named Salvidor Ortiz who is a cigar maker.  He is a poor man who finds happiness with a woman who is kidnapped by his gang of insurgents in Cuba.  The gang's leader rapes her and she becomes pregnant.  Her father believes that their aristocratic blood is tainted and tries to have her abort the child by serving her a tea laced with a plant that will induce abortion.  He almost loses his daughter but the doctor saves both her and the child, a girl.  Even after the birth her father denies his grand daughter.  The daughter runs away in the arms of Salvidor and asks him to kidnap her and they sail to the U.S.  He falls in love with this beautiful headstrong young woman and marries her.  The story continues as Salvidor, an expert cigar maker, goes through a life filled with disputes with management and raises three strong willed, independent sons and the daughter he takes as his own.  While there are fictionalized portions, much of the story is based on stories the author heard from his grandfather.  It's a heart-warming wonderful read.  If you like historical fiction, this may be a read for you.   

Veil of Lies by Jeri Westerson came early (interlibrary loan) I read it early but look forward to seeing the reactions in the read along.   Crispin Guest is known as The Tracker.  A former knight who lost his status due to a youthful rash decision, he has become an investigator who has a love/hate relationship with the sheriff.  Crispin becomes involved when a man asks him to discover whether or not his wife is being unfaithful to him.  Reluctantly he accepts the case but when he goes to report to the man that she is unfaithful, Crispin finds the man has been murdered.  Since he has not been paid he vows to discover the murderer.  One thing leads to another and national politics becomes part of the case.  Crispin gets beaten up a few times, thrown into the river, falls in love with the wife of the murdered man and works to untangle this mysterious web not the least of which is a fabric piece with the picture of a bearded man which supposedly has mysterious powers.  It's a good fast read.  

Finished Girls Only by Alex Witchel, The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, Paws for Alarm by Marian Babson, quick little cozy mystery, The Woman List by Fireflies by Jim Harrison for the contemporary challenge, Pandora's Daughter by Iris Johansen, and Shroud for a Nightingale by P.D. James.  Also finished the spring cozy mystery challenge on goodreads and Romeo and Juliet for the classics challenge.  Still working on Perdido Street Station by China Mieville and The Red Wolf Conspiracy by Robert V. Redick for the fantasy challenge.  So I guess I'm a little off the beaten track again.  However, I really love Rothfuss and guess I'll have to spring for the sequel even if it is much longer.  Great fantasy read.  

 



Last Edited on: 5/23/11 1:17 PM ET - Total times edited: 29
Date Posted: 5/1/2011 4:54 PM ET
Member Since: 1/12/2008
Posts: 1,356
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I've just (blissfully) concluded Gregory's Virgin Earth, part two of her duo on gardners to the kings during England's Cromwellian uprisings and eventual restoration of Charles II. Ugh. It's as heavy a read as its main character--the dirt in the gardens. I finished it only to complete my It's all Relative portion of the challenge but must say I am glad to have it behind me. Not my cuppa.

 

I'm off to start Womenfolk, which is the feminist-oriented selection of my IRL book club and our read for June. We'll see....not one I would ever pick up on my own, but I do acknowledge that as one of the best things about a reading group....keep y'all posted.

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 7:37 PM ET
Member Since: 7/6/2007
Posts: 747
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About to start Ken Follett's Pillars of the Earth...which will probably take the entire month of May to read  crying

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 8:35 PM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
Posts: 4,035
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Just finished Vienna Waltz by Teresa Grant. Very enjoyable mystery with a perfect touch of history and romance.  Set during the Vienna Congress of 1814 as Europe's leaders decide how to carve up Napoleon's defunct empire.

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 9:25 PM ET
Member Since: 3/8/2009
Posts: 6,035
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Funny that you all are complaining about reading too many Tudor books.  I can't remember the last one I read.  I think I'm about tired of reading medieval Britain.  Henry, Eleanor, John, Richard, and yes, even William Marshall are going to have to move to the back of the bus for while.



Last Edited on: 5/1/11 9:25 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 5/1/2011 10:00 PM ET
Member Since: 6/21/2008
Posts: 6,531
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I avoid the Tudor books.  Can't really say why except that there are too many to choose from so I just don't choose and avoid them all.  

I surprised myself by getting interested in the Roman times in Britain by reading Medicus, which is very light hearted and an easy read.  Written like an episode of NCI. 

I am getting interested in the religious murders of the Elizabethan times though.  Lots of Saints and Martyrs among those killed.



Last Edited on: 5/1/11 10:01 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 5/1/2011 10:50 PM ET
Member Since: 10/4/2010
Posts: 244
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I'm reading The Fallen Blade for the "Shiny & New" category.

Date Posted: 5/1/2011 11:40 PM ET
Member Since: 5/19/2007
Posts: 4,709
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Okay, I just finished Shadows and Strongholds.  5 stars, no question.  I loved it.  And now, after "meeting" Brunin's grandmother, I understand the necessity of inventing the scold's bridle.  I think I'll go to Lords of the White Castle for my next read.

Date Posted: 5/2/2011 7:19 AM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2008
Posts: 10,207
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Okay Vicky - I'm going to have to move Shadows and Strongholds up on my TBR list. You've tallked me into it!  Now I'm curious about the necessity of inventing the scold's bridle.wink

Date Posted: 5/2/2011 10:20 AM ET
Member Since: 8/17/2009
Posts: 1,588
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I started "Just Jane" by William Lavender this morning.  I've read quite a few doorstoppers lately, and I chose this now because it's one of the shortest books on my 2011 HF challenge (Proud to be an American entry.)  Setting is Charlestown, SC during the Revolutionary War.  It's going to be a very quick, light, easy read.  I started to write, "This could be a good book for YA," and decided to look at it more closely.  What do you know, it is.  Well suited for the break I need right now after some much heavier books.

Date Posted: 5/2/2011 12:33 PM ET
Member Since: 7/13/2005
Posts: 5,201
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I've just started The Conquest, an Elizabeth Chadwick from 1996 that has been on my TBR shelf since 2003!  Needless to say it's about the Norman Conquest.  I too am getting a bit tired of Tudor books and am trying to branch out to other eras of British history.

Date Posted: 5/2/2011 1:36 PM ET
Member Since: 2/2/2010
Posts: 1,206
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I am reading "Nefertiti" by  Michelle Moran  in an attempt to read a "quick historical" while waiting for Mistress of the Art of Death, Bk 2 to arrive.

Date Posted: 5/2/2011 1:43 PM ET
Member Since: 6/5/2007
Posts: 2,507
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Ironically, I just read a Tudor book, "The Secret Bride" by Diane Haeger about Mary Tudor, and enjoyed it. It wasn't deep, but executed nicely and a quick, fluff read. I had a cold so had some time to really plunk through it.

I gave up on "Alexander and Alestria" by Shan Sha, it was just really awful.  I still need to find something for my 500-0 spot, I'm thinking of a Colleen McCullough. Is her one on Anthony and Cleopatra a stand-alone?

Date Posted: 5/2/2011 6:28 PM ET
Member Since: 7/22/2009
Posts: 2,617
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Finished reading Cotterill's Anarchy and Old Dogs, the fourth installment in the Dr. Siri Paiboun series. I love these books -- they're just delightful. Dr. Siri's irreverence is wickedly funny -- and the other characters are entertaining as well. This book ends in such a way that I immediately picked up the next one, Curse of the Pogo Stick, and started reading. These aren't really historical fiction but if you want to read something different (Laos in the late 1970s) and quirky, I highly recommend this series.

Date Posted: 5/2/2011 6:47 PM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2008
Posts: 10,207
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Deb - I haven't read Anarchy yet but it's good to know that I should have the next one close at hand! wink

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