Book Reviews of To Marry an Heiress (Daughters of Fortune, Bk 2)

To Marry an Heiress (Daughters of Fortune, Bk 2)
To Marry an Heiress - Daughters of Fortune, Bk 2
Author: Lorraine Heath
ISBN-13: 9780380817429
ISBN-10: 038081742X
Publication Date: 9/1/2002
Pages: 384
Rating:
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 51

3.9 stars, based on 51 ratings
Publisher: Avon
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

8 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed To Marry an Heiress (Daughters of Fortune, Bk 2) on + 180 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
An American heiress heads to Victorian London and winds up getting married. Devon Sheridan, a widowed earl and father with a deteriorating estate, seeks to replenish his empty coffers by marrying Georgina Pierce, the plain, stubborn daughter of wealthy American Nathaniel Pierce. In exchange for unlimited access to Nathaniel's funds, Devon agrees to woo Georgina and provide her with the one thing she desires most children. Georgina quickly sees through the charade but marries him to please her father, who dies shortly after the wedding, having gambled away his fortune. With the help of his unconventional wife, however, Devon comes to realize that he can be wealthy without riches.
reviewed To Marry an Heiress (Daughters of Fortune, Bk 2) on + 136 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
TO MARRY AN HEIRESS is a decent read, but the real star of it is the heroine, Georgina (or "Gina"). The first half of this book was great and if it had continued in that vein, I would undoubtedly be giving the book a higher rating. Gina is an honest, straight-forward American, without artifice, vanity, or basically a single mean or selfish bone in her body. She's not placid though and can definitely be a spitfire.

What made the book go downhill for me was the hero, Devon. At the beginning I thought I was going to love him - as I usually do with HR heroes. He was staid, serious, and kind of uptight, which provides many laughable and enjoyable encounters between him and Gina, since they are so different. However around halfway through the book, he started doing/thinking/saying things that really got on my nerves. I found it extremely annoying to always hear about his first wife, Margaret - especially since she seems to have been an extremely selfish woman, who was snobbish, arrogant, and basically all-around unpleasant. I found it disconcerting that even after she shows her true colors when they're in such financial straits, he continues to love her.

Worse than that, though, was Devon's whole view on the situation - his father has squandered their fortune so once he inherits, there's basically nothing to support the estates and the tenants living there. Disaster, of course, so while Margaret elegantly withers away in her despair of not being able to buy more ballgowns, he goes out to work in the field - causing her to disdain him and him to feel shame. I was so sick of him going on and on about how the aristocracy should be doing X and they shouldn't be doing Y and ____ is appropriate of our station while ____ is not. Okay, we got it already! I know the whole "beauty" of the ending is he realizes he shouldn't be ashamed of having to work alongside the tenants and not being able to afford the lifestyle of a nobleman, but it was just waaaaaaaay too long in coming. For the second half of the book I basically wanted to slap him out of his pity party and shake some sense into him - both common sense and a sense of equality, so he would stop going on about his rank and what was or was not appropriate.

Oh, and the ending (not the epilogue, but the declaration-of-love scene) was so corny I could hardly handle it; it was kind of sickly sweet and had me rolling my eyes and wanting to skim over. So basically, I loved his kids and I loved Gina - I just wish Devon in the second half of the book could be improved on.

P.S. Plus, what is up with Devon not even telling Gina before they get married that he already has two children?? In this case it's not a bad thing because Gina loves kids, but, ummmm, I don't know ... offspring might be one of those things that you mention to your betrothed *before* you say your vows. Just a thought.

(http://historical-romance-heaven.blogspot.com/)
reviewed To Marry an Heiress (Daughters of Fortune, Bk 2) on + 29 more book reviews
This is one of my all time favorite's by Lorraine Heath.
reviewed To Marry an Heiress (Daughters of Fortune, Bk 2) on + 809 more book reviews
A great story. I love all her books & this is one of my favorites. If my keeper shelf wasn't so full I would keep all of her books. Well worth reading.
reviewed To Marry an Heiress (Daughters of Fortune, Bk 2) on
I enjoyed this book very much, I have read quite a few of this authors works.
reviewed To Marry an Heiress (Daughters of Fortune, Bk 2) on + 7 more book reviews
Story starts in London 1878. An Earl wants to marry for convenience but gets more than he expected. Great reading!
reviewed To Marry an Heiress (Daughters of Fortune, Bk 2) on + 136 more book reviews
TO MARRY AN HEIRESS is a decent read, but the real star of it is the heroine, Georgina (or "Gina"). The first half of this book was great and if it had continued in that vein, I would undoubtedly be giving the book a higher rating. Gina is an honest, straight-forward American, without artifice, vanity, or basically a single mean or selfish bone in her body. She's not placid though and can definitely be a spitfire.

What made the book go downhill for me was the hero, Devon. At the beginning I thought I was going to love him - as I usually do with HR heroes. He was staid, serious, and kind of uptight, which provides many laughable and enjoyable encounters between him and Gina, since they are so different. However around halfway through the book, he started doing/thinking/saying things that really got on my nerves. I found it extremely annoying to always hear about his first wife, Margaret - especially since she seems to have been an extremely selfish woman, who was snobbish, arrogant, and basically all-around unpleasant. I found it disconcerting that even after she shows her true colors when they're in such financial straits, he continues to love her.

Worse than that, though, was Devon's whole view on the situation - his father has squandered their fortune so once he inherits, there's basically nothing to support the estates and the tenants living there. Disaster, of course, so while Margaret elegantly withers away in her despair of not being able to buy more ballgowns, he goes out to work in the field - causing her to disdain him and him to feel shame. I was so sick of him going on and on about how the aristocracy should be doing X and they shouldn't be doing Y and ____ is appropriate of our station while ____ is not. Okay, we got it already! I know the whole "beauty" of the ending is he realizes he shouldn't be ashamed of having to work alongside the tenants and not being able to afford the lifestyle of a nobleman, but it was just waaaaaaaay too long in coming. For the second half of the book I basically wanted to slap him out of his pity party and shake some sense into him - both common sense and a sense of equality, so he would stop going on about his rank and what was or was not appropriate.

Oh, and the ending (not the epilogue, but the declaration-of-love scene) was so corny I could hardly handle it; it was kind of sickly sweet and had me rolling my eyes and wanting to skim over. So basically, I loved his kids and I loved Gina - I just wish Devon in the second half of the book could be improved on.

P.S. Plus, what is up with Devon not even telling Gina before they get married that he already has two children?? In this case it's not a bad thing because Gina loves kids, but, ummmm, I don't know ... offspring might be one of those things that you mention to your betrothed *before* you say your vows. Just a thought.

(http://historical-romance-heaven.blogspot.com/)
reviewed To Marry an Heiress (Daughters of Fortune, Bk 2) on + 1345 more book reviews
Devon Sheridan, the Earl of Huntingdon, needs money desperately. The easiest way to get it is to marry a rich American heiress so he can pay off his debts and restore his crumbling estate. He approaches Nathaniel Pierce and asks to marry his daughter, Georgina. Nathaniel knows his daughter wants children, and sees this as a way to get her settled with a titled gentleman. Even though Gina wants to marry for love, she also wants to see her father happy and knows that a successful marriage will do that. After a quick wedding, Devon is surprised to find that Gina is far different from his first wife. He enjoys spending time getting to know Gina and thinks this marriage may turn out well. That is...until he finds out that the Pierce fortune is gone and there will be no marriage settlement.

As usual, Lorraine Heath writes a pleasing historical romance with fabulous characters. Devon has a strict adherence to society's rules. As a member of the aristocracy, appearances are everything. He is lord of the manor and does not work for his money. Gina thinks this is ridiculous since he is in dire need of money. Their different philosophies and opposite outlooks make this story an enjoyable story. Gina is a heroine without a selfish bone in her body. She wants to help her husband and his children with their problems, even though he blames her for her father losing her fortune. My rating: 4.5 Stars.