Book Reviews of Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s

Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s
Miss American Pie A Diary of Love Secrets and Growing Up in the 1970s
Author: Margaret Sartor
ISBN-13: 9780739479889
ISBN-10: 0739479881
Pages: 272
Rating:
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
 25

3.5 stars, based on 25 ratings
Publisher: Bloomsbury
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

9 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s on + 95 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
If you have forgotten what it's like to be a teenager you should not miss this book. It's based on the true diary entries of Margaret "Maggie" Sartor during her tumultuous teens. It starts with simple day-by-day 2-3 sentence thoughts as a 12 yr. old and ends with her going off to college as an 18 yr. old high school graduate. With its deeply personal, painstaking, honest, and sometimes laugh-out-loud entries, it is the best diary-type book that I have read. It made me appreciate that I will never have to repeat adolescence again. Read this book!!
reviewed Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s on + 95 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
If you have forgotten what it's like to be a teenager you should not miss this book. It's based on the true diary entries of Margaret "Maggie" Sartor during her tumultuous teens. It starts with simple day-by-day 2-3 sentence thoughts as a 12 yr. old and ends with her going off to college as an 18 yr. old high school graduate. With its deeply personal, painstaking, honest, and sometimes laugh-out-loud entries, it is the best diary-type book that I have read. It made me appreciate that I will never have to repeat adolescence again. Read this book!!
reviewed Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s on + 10 more book reviews
This is an easy, laid-back, simple and quick read. I did enjoy it.
reviewed Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s on + 346 more book reviews
3.75 stars, really.
This book contains about 5 or 6 years of diary entries made by the author from when she was a pre-teen through high school during the early to late 70's. It was so interesting to read some of her entries because they were humorous and also gave a lot of historical events too here and there. We see her struggles as she finds herself and doesn't know who she is or what she is going to be. We see her falling in and out of love and even dating a guy for about two years the she doesn't even love, while not giving into pressure. She talks a lot about her longing to do right and her search for God. Her best friend and her have such a great relationship throughout the book too (the boy next store). She talks a lot about her longing for her parents' approval, her issues with friends, and her love for horses. It was really a sweet book to read. It was real life!
I read this book in about 2 days. I didn't think I'd get into it, but I certainly did.
reviewed Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s on
Cute fun book about growing up in the 70's . A pretty normal kid's story , a refreshing change from all the dysfuntual autobiogrphies. It makes you smile.
reviewed Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Marta Morrison for TeensReadToo.com

This was a good book. It is an actual journal of the author written in the seventies. I graduated from high school and college in the seventies so I could relate to many of the references made in the journal. I think today's girls could also relate, though, because the themes in the journals are the same struggles that today's teens go through.

It starts when Margaret is in the seventh grade and goes through her senior year. At first the entries are brief and some are quite funny. Later they get more poignant.

Margaret is boy crazy, bored, rebellious, and is trying to figure out what she believes. In the seventies, we had many issues involving desegregation, drugs, sex -- it was the era of the sexual revolution, feminism, and the big mega-churches were founded and grew in that decade. I laughed at many of the entries, especially when she would write of some profound event and not elaborate and the next entry would be something very trivial.

For example: November 8 -- Nixon was elected president. November 9 -- Everyone says me and Vernon would make a good couple. (Nixon being elected president was exciting and had worldwide ramifications but her and Vernon being a good couple didn't last more than a week.) Another example: August 8 -- President Nixon resigned; made appointment to get my hair cut.

I love that entry. It is such a teen statement. MISS AMERICAN PIE is realistic and fun to read. Plus, it makes you want to start a journal, too.
reviewed Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s on + 88 more book reviews
Well, I just finished Book One for four of my five challenges, pretty darn good!

Miss American Pie by Margaret Sartor is actually a diary she kept between the ages of 13 and 18. When I realized what it was, I became even more interested because I could relate to it. I kept a diary starting when I was 12 or 13 and until I married my first husband.

I felt many of the things young Margaret felt: "Rained again. That's my life." "I hate these days with nothing to do." "Jesus, are you watching over me? I hope someone is." "The first time I thought about killing myself, I was about ten years old." Some of it is so mundane, some of it filled with so much pain.

Margaret is six years younger than me. She remembers many of the things I do--Watergate, for one thing. She grew up in Louisiana and remembers desegregation and rascism on a level I don't.

You can see her maturing and her ability to reason and figure things out through the years. She sure was boy crazy, I have to say that!
reviewed Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s on + 95 more book reviews
If you have forgotten what it's like to be a teenager you should not miss this book. It's based on the true diary entries of Margaret "Maggie" Sartor during her tumultuous teens. It starts with simple day-by-day 2-3 sentence thoughts as a 12 yr. old and ends with her going off to college as an 18 yr. old high school graduate. With its deeply personal, painstaking, honest, and sometimes laugh-out-loud entries, it is the best diary-type book that I have read. It made me appreciate that I will never have to repeat adolescence again. Read this book!!
reviewed Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Marta Morrison for TeensReadToo.com

This was a good book. It is an actual journal of the author written in the seventies. I graduated from high school and college in the seventies so I could relate to many of the references made in the journal. I think today's girls could also relate, though, because the themes in the journals are the same struggles that today's teens go through.

It starts when Margaret is in the seventh grade and goes through her senior year. At first the entries are brief and some are quite funny. Later they get more poignant.

Margaret is boy crazy, bored, rebellious, and is trying to figure out what she believes. In the seventies, we had many issues involving desegregation, drugs, sex -- it was the era of the sexual revolution, feminism, and the big mega-churches were founded and grew in that decade. I laughed at many of the entries, especially when she would write of some profound event and not elaborate and the next entry would be something very trivial.

For example: November 8 -- Nixon was elected president. November 9 -- Everyone says me and Vernon would make a good couple. (Nixon being elected president was exciting and had worldwide ramifications but her and Vernon being a good couple didn't last more than a week.) Another example: August 8 -- President Nixon resigned; made appointment to get my hair cut.

I love that entry. It is such a teen statement. MISS AMERICAN PIE is realistic and fun to read. Plus, it makes you want to start a journal, too.