Search - Mother Night

Mother Night
Mother Night
Author: Kurt Vonnegut
Mother Night is a daring challenge to our moral sense. American Howard W. Campbell, Jr., a spy during World War II, is now on trial in Israel as a Nazi war criminal. But is he really guilty? In this brilliant book rife with true gallows humor, Vonnegut turns black and white into a chilling shade of gray with a verdict that will haunt us all.
The Market's bargain prices are even better for Paperbackswap club members!
Retail Price: $16.00
Buy New (Paperback): $12.79 (save 20%) or
Become a PBS member and pay $8.89+1 PBS book credit (save 44%)
ISBN-13: 9780385334143
ISBN-10: 0385334141
Publication Date: 5/11/1999
Pages: 288
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 81

4.1 stars, based on 81 ratings
Publisher: Delta
Book Type: Paperback
Other Versions: Hardcover
Members Wishing: 6
Reviews: Member | Amazon | Write a Review
Read All 5 Book Reviews of "Mother Night"

Please Log in to Rate these Book Reviews

reviewed Mother Night on + 606 more book reviews
When I started to read this, I realized I had read it before back in the 1970s along with other Vonnegut classics such as "Slaughterhouse Five," "Sirens of Titan," "Cat's Cradle," and "God Bless You Mr. Rosewater." I hadn't read a Vonnegut since then but I am anxious to read more. "Mother Night" is a great satire giving the story of Howard W. Campbell, Jr., who was born in the U.S. and became a Nazi propagandist who broadcast during WWII. However, he was really a spy for the U.S. Government. Campbell narrates his own story as he sits awaiting trial for war crimes in an Israeli prison. The book is brilliant and full of gallows humor as Campbell reveals his ironic tale. (Campbell also makes a brief appearance in Vonnegut's "Slaughterhouse Five"). High recommendation for this and any other Vonnegut.
reviewed Mother Night on + 15 more book reviews
Vonnegut is one of my favorite authors. While I didn't love this book as much as some of his other works, I found that it still held some truths about life, encased in an interesting story. One of the more interesting themes in this book is that we are who we pretend to be.


Genres: