Book Reviews of Motivating Your Kids from Crayons to Career

Motivating Your Kids from Crayons to Career
Motivating Your Kids from Crayons to Career
Author: Cheri Fuller
ISBN-13: 9780892746729
ISBN-10: 0892746726
Publication Date: 12/1990
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 2

3.8 stars, based on 2 ratings
Publisher: Harrison House
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Motivating Your Kids from Crayons to Career on + 586 more book reviews
CRAYONS TO CAREER

...is a timely book packed with:

1. Helpful methods for challenging and supporting your kids for success at school and throughout their lives.

2. Easy-to-apply learning ideas and practical suggestions supported by specific examples.

3. Insights into how and why children are motivated or demotivated.

Principles you will learn include:

1. How to make learning fun for your child.

2. How to prepare a creative learning environment with a close parent-child relationship.

3. How to unlock the power of positive role modeling.

4. How to help your child avoid pressure, stress and burnout.

5. How to maintain a healthy perspective on grades.

Plus exclusive motivation boosters and keys to destroying motivation busters!
reviewed Motivating Your Kids from Crayons to Career on + 112 more book reviews
(back cover) Helpful methods for challenging and supporting your kids for success at school and throughout their lives. Easy-to-apply learning ideas and practical suggestions supported by specific examples. Insights into how and why children are motivated or demotivated.
reviewed Motivating Your Kids from Crayons to Career on + 1020 more book reviews
Motivating your Kids from Crayons to Career by Cheri Fuller. It cautions parents not to push children. It suggests that pressure to succeed, learning to read, and too-early emphasis on academic subjects places a great deal of stress on children in our society. The book also indicated that early formal learning was not associated with better academic skills later. Late learners caught up with their peers who had learned such skills earlier. Other anecdotal information suggests that children in daycare-with single parents or two working parents-benefit from preschool, while children with one parent at home full time actually did slightly better in kindergarten if they had not gone to preschool.