Book Reviews of Mutant Message Down Under

Mutant Message Down Under
Mutant Message Down Under
Author: Marlo Morgan
ISBN-13: 9781883473006
ISBN-10: 1883473004
Publication Date: 10/1992
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 8

4.1 stars, based on 8 ratings
Publisher: Bookpeople
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

43 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on + 10 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
Absolutely loved this book. Refreshing information, served up in a lovely story - rather than having to muddle through boring self help literataure - what a treat. Google the author for fun....quite a bit of controversy around the book...regardless, truth or fiction, not to be missed. Thumbs up!
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Helpful Score: 2
I think the world would be a better place if all Americans read this book and took its message to heart.
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Helpful Score: 2
This book is an account of the time an American medical doctor spent with a group of Aborigines in the Outback. Her journey involved a series of miraculous events that she claims transformed her life.
I found this to be a very facinating story, but I must warn you to read this with an open mind! My Australian friends look at this book as a 'ridiculous fabrication,' lacking any authenticity, a hoax! Having stated that, I still feel it is a worthwhile read. This story can help put your life in perspective, especially if you are dealing with any personal difficulties.
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Helpful Score: 2
A good inspirational read. Something we can all use these days, right? True or not, hokey or not, it was fun to read; and causes some real thinking about what is "real".
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Helpful Score: 1
Excellent! A wonderfully inspirational read. Puts you back in touch with simple truths and spiritual lessons. This wonderful writing trancends all beliefs and helps you get back in touch with nature and your inner knowledge and guidance.
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on + 70 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Actually, this book is real. I met the author at a NAWBO meeting when she first self-published this book in Kansas City. The story she tells is facinating. Her experiences with a tribe of Aboriginals in Austrailia as they travel on foot in the Outback country is beautiful and shares a tribal lifestyle disappearing from the planet.
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Helpful Score: 1
I absolutely loved this book. The writing is very simple but the message is very important and given in a very clear and direct manner. It reaffirmed my beliefs in environmentalism and the need to change the way we live in order to maintain the health of our planet.
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on
Helpful Score: 1
This book is controversial. It is presented as the actual experience of the author but may be entirely invented. Nevertheless, it's interesting reading and thought provoking.
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Helpful Score: 1
Did not care for this book. The message of the "real people" is a fine and important one, but the writing is simple and the author strains credibility. Which is why, I'm sure, she gave herself an out in the preface, stating that this book is true but she had to write it like a novel. I felt like the author was throwing in pieces of native lore she'd heard about from other cultures. Did not ring true.
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Helpful Score: 1
"The story of a courageous wmoan, who walked with the Aboriginals and learned the wonderful secrets and wisdom of an old, old tribe. Things we all need to learn in our modern society; to get back in touch with nature, to trust and have faith in our inner knowledge and guidance." Elisabeth Kubler-Ross
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Helpful Score: 1
From Booklist
The first incarnation of this spellbinding account of an American doctor's experience on walkabout in Australia was a "peaceful self-published work." As such, it stirred up quite a bit of controversy and sold more than 370,000 copies. Very few of these ended up on library shelves, however, and HarperCollins is banking on an ongoing demand with a 250,000-copy first printing, a decision bolstered by a Literary Guild special release designation. Does this quiet little book merit such faith and enthusiasm? Yes. Why? Because Morgan's spiritual journey is as compelling as any classical myth. Morgan has called her narrative a work of fiction to protect the identities of her Aboriginal guides, to conceal the locations of sacred places, and to let readers interpret her tale as they see fit. In fact, she wants us to be as open as she was when her adventure began. Morgan believed she was being taken to an awards luncheon for her work with urban Aborigines when, sporting a fancy new suit, she climbed into a jeep and headed out of town, but hours later, she found herself at the edge of Australia's outback clad only in a thin shift, watching her possessions go up in flames. Her guides, telepathic and spiritually advanced descendants of a 50,000-year-old tradition, call themselves the "real people" and refer to Westerners as "mutants." Morgan's trek across the heart of Australia involved a series of increasingly revelatory and even miraculous occurrences. This demanding journey transformed Morgan's work as a healer into that of a messenger with a message many are eager to hear. Donna Seaman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on + 20 more book reviews
This is a wonderful book. I found it at a book sale and was intrigued by the blurb.
I found that I could not put it down as I began to take the journey into the outback with the main character. This journey is as much of the land as it is of the soul.
When the last page came, I wished that it was all real and had happened.
Now, I always pick this up and keep it to give to a friend.
Don't be put off by the title, read it!
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on + 16 more book reviews
A true spiritual odyssey in Australia's outback.
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on
This was a great story. Really interesting,different,thought provoking
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on + 68 more book reviews
American woman walks across Australia. Very good book!
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nice story. very compelling
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on
An interesting read correctly classified as fiction.
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Truth or Fiction, this book is full of truth. One of the most valuable books ever written.
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I didn't care for this book. The author expects you to accept it as a true story but too many elements seem over the top and don't ring true.
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I love this book. I thought it was wonderful
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I loved this book so much that I will keep it and not put back up to swap. It says so much about how we look at life, family and so much more. It makes me want to know more about what goes on in all different countries. I would recommend it to be read in high schools and even middle schools.
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on
The book was a spiritual experience. It is an easy read with a great deal of depth. I actually bought two more copies to share with friends!
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Even fiction should not be false information.
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on + 91 more book reviews
This was truly an interesting book. Great wisdom!
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interesting experiences
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incredible story!!!
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on + 16 more book reviews
This story touched my soul. In Mutant Message Down Under, follow the journey of a woman who discovers what it means to be a member of an Australian aborigine tribe... and what it means to be human.

I loved this gripping true story, and you will too! Once you pick it up, you simply can't put it down!
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on + 5623 more book reviews
Sort of narcissic account.
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on + 20 more book reviews
I really enjoyed this book.
It is a story based on actual people though the names were not disclosed to protect them.
When I finished the book I wished that it were true.
A good and inspiring read.
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Lots to pnder in this powerful book...simple truths with spiritual lessons.
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The writing isn't great, but the story is fascinating.
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Very interesting and captivating book about a woman's experiences with an aborigne tribe in Australia.
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Great story about walking in the outback.
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I really enjoyed this book. The book is about a social worker/accupuncturist that is chosen for a surprise walkabout with an aboriginal tribe. She lives with the tribe for 4 months, and learns about their way of life and world view. In the first few pages the reader watches her loose all her clothes, wallet, jewelry, important papers, cell phone, and sense of security, and her shoes. She follows the tribe into the burning desert of Australia with nothing but an old rag on her body. But she learns so much!
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This is a very powerful read. Spiritual and unforgettable.
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I guess I am at a different point in my life. While it tells a story of a woman coming into her own sense of self, it's just a bit silly hokey stuff. Call it what it is: fiction/fantasy.
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Even after 3 trips to Australia and a tiny bit of knowledge on the native people, I could not get into this book. After reading over half way through, I shelved it.
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An excellent read. Introduces a totally different way of looking at and preserving older lifestyles.
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When this book was originally published in 1991 it was promoted as nonfiction and in the foreword the author says that the story the reader is about to discover is a true account of what happened to her in Australia. Years later however the book was republished as fiction and there are a few websites that post a wide variety of information intended to prove that the account is in fact fictitious. I have read both the book and the articles protesting it, as well as the account of the statement Ms. Morgan's made to the representatives of an Australian Aboriginal association acknowledging that her book is a work of fiction, and find that more than anything this whole situation makes me sad and disappointed. If what Ms. Morgan writes about really happened then why are people so determined to discredit her and her book? And if her story is fiction then why did she make such an effort to make people believe that it's not? Why apologize to the Aboriginal representatives if there's nothing to apologize for? And if there is something to apologize for then why shrug it off and continue as if nothing happened? Money seems to be the answer, and if financial gain is based on deception that makes me deeply disappointed in my fellow man.
On one hand I wanted to believe that the book is a memoir because the idea of a small society living in peace with themselves and the world around them, and not upsetting the natural balance of their environment is reassuring at a time when we keep hearing about climate change, whole species disappearing, pockets of land that has not been touched by humans becoming smaller and smaller. Now, I'm not a person who'll willingly move out of the city and live without electricity and plumbing to reduce my carbon footprint, but I will recycle and conserve water and power whenever I can, and I do believe that our actions affect the planet in a way that's ultimately detrimental to the length of time the human race will be able to enjoy themselves on Earth. After all, if one uses resources faster than they can be replenished sooner or later they will run out, and we have not yet figured out a way to make natural gas and oil or grow trees faster than it happens in nature.
On the other hand as I read the book some things struck me as odd. There were mentions of concepts and places that I wouldn't expect to hear from a people who were portrayed as a group who shun technology and all things modern because they see little value in them, such as mutation and outer space. The timeline seemed somewhat flexible at times, to say the least. The author seemed to go between needing an interpreter's help during the simplest of conversations and having complex discussions with members of the tribe without the interpreter present. And speaking of the members of the tribe, I did not understand why everybody had names that meant something when translated, such as Secret Keeper and Female Healer, and even Ms. Morgan was given a name fashioned in the same way, but the man who served as interpreter was known simply as Ooota? I was also put off by frequent talk about how the author was loosing weight on this walkabout, how pounds were literally melting off of her, and yet we have only relatively general depiction of her life with the tribe. I don't know about you, but I would much rather hear more about the daily life of a people so unlike my own than about how much thinner one American has gotten over the course of several months in the outback. There also seemed to be an undercurrent of "if you reject this account as truth then you're with those who say that people living without technology in the bush are lesser beings and that's just wrong", which grated on my nerves with its one-sidedness.
There was quite a bit of what can be referred to as "new age-y" talk about the importance of discovering and developing our own unique gifts, about how all humans are linked to each other, about us covering up the fundamental essense of life by figurative gravies and frostings, honoring animals' purpose by hunting them for food, how every experience is a lesson to be learned and if we don't learn it then we're presented with the same lesson again, etc. In some things the author completely lost me, in others I agreed with her because ultimately there is tremendous personal value in actively pursuing areas in which one is talented, and being aware of our impact on the world has value for all mankind.
Last but not least let's talk about writing. It is a book after all, regardless of whether it's a novel or a memoir. The writing was pretty consistent with what I'd expect from a first novel by a person with no literary aspirations, although it was polished by the Harper Collins team of experts and therefore is generally smoother reading than some independently-published books I've seen over the last year. There was a lot of telling instead of showing and I would have appreciated more scenes depicting the events of the months of the walkabout instead of the simple mentions that things happened and people exist. The author says that the particulars were omitted to protect the privacy of the people, but with everything I've read after finishing the book I can't help but think that it's just a copout.
I'm glad that I've read this book, if nothing else it made me think about the world and my place in it while I was reading and about people's goals and intentions when I finished it.
reviewed Mutant Message Down Under on + 740 more book reviews
Her December 1993 walkabout. The author shared the life of a tribe of aborigines (62 strong).
Chapter 22, My Oath. They visit a Sacred Site; few now belong to the people.
Re: Ayers Rock, that once was Uluru and "is now available to tourists, who climb it like ants, then return to their excursion bus to spend the remainder of the day floating in the chlorinated antiseptic swimming pools of the nearby motels."
The authority that runs the national park that includes Ayers Rock decreed that there would be no more climbing as of 2019 (The Age, Melbourne, 2 November 2017).
The book includes some nice drawings but no index, photos, or map. The reason for the latter omission is explained as protecting the privacy of the people who generously hosted this American.
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A thought-provoking story about an american woman who accompanies a remote tribe of aboriginals on a four month journey through the Outback. I enjoyed it.
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Very interesting and amazing story. My husband & I have enjoyed this book. He use to read it to me so we could enjoy it together, and he isn't much of a reader. It was so great that he gave it away as a gift to a good friend of ours, which was why we had to get it again. There are some very funny things that happen to the author on her walk about.
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Full of spiritual wisdom, insights and adventure. A MUST read!