Book Reviews of The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1)

The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1)
The Name of the Wind - Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1
Author: Patrick Rothfuss
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ISBN-13: 9780756404741
ISBN-10: 0756404746
Publication Date: 4/1/2008
Pages: 724
Rating:
  • Currently 4.4/5 Stars.
 218

4.4 stars, based on 218 ratings
Publisher: DAW
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

29 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 25
A mere 2 hours or so after finishing this novel I picked it up and started reading it again. Now why in the world would I do this? I asked myself that question a few times and my answer is:

* It's damn good writing.
The language Rothfuss uses is beautiful, absolutely beautiful. I found myself rereading sections simply because they were so delightfully and beautifully written. He has a poetical turn of phrase, and there are passages that simply sing.

* But it's also a riveting story.
The story pulled me in, immersing me in Kvothe's world so much that I half expected to see the scrael scuttling through my backyard (a truly terrifying thought for anyone who hates spiders as passionately as I do).

* And the characters are absolutely believable.
Kvothe is a living and breathing character who practically leaps off the page--unruly red hair and eyes bright green like new growth grass. He is absolutely believable, especially to anyone who remembers being a boy and the awkwardness that comes with growing up.

I guess that's three answers.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 11
A mere 2 hours or so after finishing this novel I picked it up and started reading it again. Now why in the world would I do this? I asked myself that question a few times and my answer is:

* It's damn good writing.
The language Rothfuss uses is beautiful, absolutely beautiful. I found myself rereading sections simply because they were so delightfully and beautifully written. He has a poetical turn of phrase, and there are passages that simply sing.

* But it's also a riveting story.
The story pulled me in, immersing me in Kvothe's world so much that I half expected to see the scrael scuttling through my backyard (a truly terrifying thought for anyone who hates spiders as passionately as I do).

* And the characters are absolutely believable.
Kvothe is a living and breathing character who practically leaps off the page--unruly red hair and eyes bright green like new growth grass. He is absolutely believable, especially to anyone who remembers being a boy and the awkwardness that comes with growing up.

I guess that's three answers.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 101 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 8
Book 1 of an epic trilogy. The story keeps calling you back to see what happens next. A little magic, some swordplay, loyalty and honor on one hand, treachery and betrayal on the other, heroic sacrifices and craven cowardice. This is a story to become caught up in. I felt anguish at the character's tribulations and failures as well as celebrating their victories. Can't wait to start book 2.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 1139 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 5
Gorgeous writing, true-to-life characters and an engrossing story--this book has it all--and how poorly that expresses the magic of The Name of the Wind.

The characters are real people, people who don't always know the right answers, or say the right things at the right time, and who don't always win, or learn from the losing. Yet many are people I'd love to meet for their courage and insight, their humor, for their sheer human-ness. The story is intriguing, meticulously detailed, marvelously inventive, yet never slow. And the writing is simply wonderful. Period. It's been a long time since I've savored writing that resonates with me so deeply, and re-read passages because I didn't want them to end.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 167 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
Really interesting story like none other I have read. Looking forward to the next book.

This is a debut book that is the start of a series. Thick book over 700 pages! That is equal to to regular novels these days. Compared to Lord Of The Rings by some and considered the best stories told by any medium, deep, intricate and wondrous by others.

From the back cover:
My name is Kvothe. I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep.

You may have heard of me.

So begins a tale unequaled in fantasy literature == the story of a hero told in his own voice. It is a tale of sorrow, a tale of survival, a tale of one man's search for meaning in his universe, and how that search, and the indomitable will that drove it, gave birth to a legend.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 12 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
As many have already said in their review of this debut novel, Rothfuss manages to create not only likable characters, but believable characters. His settings are detailed enough to give you a general idea but not so detailed that you forbidden to use your imagination. I cannot wait for the second and third book in this series. I will, without a doubt, reread them all.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 48 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
A brilliant first novel by Patrick Rothfuss answers the question 'how does a legend become a legend?' with a first-hand narrative. Kvothe is known throughout the land for his deeds, good and bad, and in this carefully and well crafted story within a story (within a story?) we're drawn into Kvothe's 'now' where he lives as Kote the innkeeper in a small village that might soon need Kvothe the Kingkiller.

While 'Kote' has chosen to hide here in this little village a Chronicler has followed rumors and stories to seek him out in order to record his legend. Kote must, if only for the length of the story, transform himself back to Kvothe and grudgingly does with the condition that the Chronicler take his story word for word and completely from his beginning with his parents and a wandering troupe all the way through to the end wherever that might lead. Kvothe's story is laid out within his current situation, hiding in the middle of nowhere as a failing innkeeper, where his inn must still be tended and bad, bad things are starting to happen.

Characters are well-rounded, plot developing well- intricate and rich in details, our hero is likable (though maybe not likely, at least to start) and our villain(s) properly challenging and/or ominous and while the story within a story format could be cumbersome and confusing this writer avoids that by carefully drawing the lines so you always know where you are- this first book promises an epic series in the vein of George R R Martin's Song of Ice and Fire or perhaps the Inheritance trilogy.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 306 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
I love fantasy and can never seem to get enough of it. Sometimes I enjoy a book and sometimes one will seem just like the rest. Then comes one that stands out from the rest and you know that this is one you'll treasure all your life. This is what I felt about The Name of the Wind. I put off reading this book because it was so long. I have very little time to read even though I enjoy it immensely. So I have to be choosy on which book to read next. Well I finally picked this one and my only regret was not picking it up sooner. What a gem! Not since I read Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series have I been so captivated.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 2
Best fantasy book I've read in years. Outstanding characterization and world building.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 185 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
There are very few fantasy novels (and even fewer first fantasy novels) that can boast four full pages of rave reviews from both other authors and from media sources such as the San Francisco Chronicle, Publisher's Weekly, and Locus. I picked it up with some trepidation, as I have had no desire to read any of the novels or authors it is compared to (everyone and everything from Robert Jordan to the Harry Potter novels, George R. R. Martin to (of course) the Lord of the Rings)(well, I've read the LotR, but none of the others). It is a tome, to be sure, and only part one of three, which also was cause for concern, because there is little that annoys me more in fantasy today than the cliffhanger ending.

But by 50 pages in, very shortly after Chronicler gets Kvothe to begin his tale, I began to hope that the novel really was as good as everyone else seemed to think. I was immediately drawn to the characters and enamored of the Kvothe's narrative style. There were quite a few excellent images sprinkled daintily throughout the prose, and if some of the more resonant were unfortunately belabored, that was a minor quibble for a very worthy first book.

I ran into a little trouble when Kvothe arrived at University, because far too many characters were introduced all at once, and Rothfuss never gave most of them enough distinguishing characteristics for me to tell them apart. Making things more difficult, the publisher (shockingly!) did not include a list of characters (dramatis personae, if you will) at the front of the book as is becoming fairly common in today's epic fantasy. But still, the story moved briskly, the moments of danger were rendered well enough that my heart raced, and I was surprised into laughing out loud at just the right moments.

And yet, sometime around 2/3 of the way through, Rothfuss lost me. Perhaps it was that for the 80th time, Kvothe chose not to tell any of his masters any piece of the reasons he behaved the way he did. I can not believe that there was not one who would have reached a hand out to help him, especially when his most pressing need throughout the novel was ready cash. It could not be pride, for he had been a beggar and had never let pride get in the way of getting what he wanted before. It is possible that the world Rothfuss has created is so mean that no one would reach out a hand in that fashion, and that Kvothe knows that; there is even some evidence to that effect in the text, for that attitude would suit the followers of Tehlu. But if that is the Rothfuss' world, I do not know that I want to spend any more time in it. A world that cold may very well go to hell with my blessing.

Still, despite losing my affection in that way, the story moved on briskly. As I expected, it did not have an ending, and that was just as frustrating as it always is, but there was a bit of grace in the final scene between Bast and the Chronicler, and the image of silence on the final page was arresting. Rothfuss has as good an ear for the mood of his audience as any fine bard, and his "to be continued" was handled as well as it possibly could have been. I am left wanting more, and I certainly will read the next book.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 18 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This is the best fantasy book ever written. Period. The use of language is enchanting, the story twists and turns, always keeping the reader interested, and there is not too much odd language or strangeness.

While needed to fully understand the story, the first 100 pages drag and are confusing. Instead of putting the 700 pages down, skip to chapter twenty and read from there. If you do, I'll promise you will go back and get the beginning of the book later. If Rothfuss never writes another book (and two more are due in this series) he has created a masterpiece.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 962 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Youve all felt it at one point or another. The desire. The craving. The urge to go to bed with a book. The new hardcover whose jacket youve taken off for safekeeping; falling asleep with one hand splayed over its naked, embossed cover. An old favorite, its edges worn and soft to the touch; it fits perfectly in the space beside you on your wrinkled sheets.

At around 700 pages, THE NAME OF THE WIND is the perfect shape and story to sleep with.

(At least, I assume it would be, as I read this on an e-reader.)

Even without the tangible reassurance of a physical copy, THE NAME OF THE WIND easily slid into its position as my new favorite book. Somewhere in an alternate universe, J. K. Rowling and George R. R. Martin had a literary lovechild, who somehow stowed away on a ship bound for Earth, assumed the human name of Patrick Rothfuss, and, after wandering, bard-like, through many years of higher education, discovered the secret to turning words and ideas into gold.

Remember those sleepaway camps and public library programs you attended when you were young, the ones where the performer would gather you and the other kids round the sleepy campfire or colorful hand-sewn rug? Remember how, at first, you were suspicious of this stranger with the odd hair or scruffy beard or clothing that audibly ruffled whenever he shifted positions? Remember how his voice sounded unfamiliar at first, unlike the dulcet tones of your own parents telling you bedtime stories? And then remember how, before you knew it, you were so far immersed into the story you forgot who was telling it and found yourself leaning forward, hanging on to his every mesmerizing word?

Thats kind of how THE NAME OF THE WIND was for me. The third-person beginning section was a little awkward, as I wasnt sure how I was supposed to feel about this Kote/Kvothe character. But as Kvothe stretched out his long-unused storytelling muscles and the book eased its loving way into first-person narration, I found myself as entranced as Chronicler and Bast were, sitting in that inn and listening to the never-before-told story of a contemporary legend.

He has a sexy voice, what can I say?

I could mention some minor quibbles I had with the book, like Kvothes unfortunate near-perfect-ness, or how Denna skirts the edge of geeky-adolescent-boys MPDG wet dream, but it totally and completely doesnt even matter because dont you know that the greatest artists can break all the rules? THE NAME OF THE WIND is an epic novel, part memoir, part boarding school tale, part wild adventure, and I just know that Kvothes world is only going to expand from here in future installments. Recommended for anyone and everyone anywhereexcept for maybe that hipster classmate of yours with the I-just-got-out-of-bed-no-really-I-just-did messy hair and black Free Trade coffee perpetually in hand who refuses to read anything that hasnt won the Nobel, Pulitzer, or Man Booker Prize. But who wants to be reading buddies with them anyway?
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 52 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This is the story of an innkeeper in a small village who used to be much, much more than an innkeeper. When Chronicler stumbles upon this inn, they strike a bargain that the innkeeper will tell his life story in three days and in return Chronicler will write it word for word and then leave him alone. This novel is day one of the telling. As such, don't expect any of the threads of this story to be wrapped up by the end of the novel. It doesn't leave you on a cliffhanger, but it definitely leaves you wondering what's going to happen next. As the innkeeper himself says at the end of this novel, "That should do for now, I imagine. We have all the groundwork now. A foundation of story to build upon. Tomorrow we'll have some of my favorite stories." The writing itself was very good with some wonderfully brilliant descriptions. One of my favorites was when he was describing a time of hopelessness and says that it was so hopeless that women didn't bother naming their children. Now that's hopeless! This had an undistinguished low-tech fantasy setting with a modicum of magic thrown in. There were some very interesting characters, but lots of humdrum characters thrown in too. The main character himself was interesting, but despite his supposed brilliance often did really annoyingly dumb things. Overall, this is a very good book which I'd recommend to fans of fantasy, but it isn't as earth-shattering as I had expected after reading all the rave reviews.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 2 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This is one of the best books I have read in a long time. I was thrilled it was a trilogy and went to order the second book...only to find out it has not been released yet! Book two is in the works, so I guess I will just wait.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 2 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I am not one to read a book more than once, but this is the first book ever that I have read 3 times. It is entierly mind blowind, i've recomended it to everyone i know. You will truly enjoy this book wether you like the jundra or not. Briliantly writen.

Trully, one of the best books i've read in a very long time.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 1
This is a great book. I have had it for over a year and have probably read it like 5 times or more. It just drags a person into the story, even if they first start it and are not that interested in it.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 330 more book reviews
My second fav book EVER! A story that has stayed with me for years as well. I loved the story line, the adventure, the time its set in, everything about it. There is a sequel and Ive yet to read it. Ive had it on my wish list for a very loooooong time. Dont miss this one if you love fantasy. There is no romance, this is all straight up 100% fantasy. Get the hardcover edition as this is a very long book. It will hold up better.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 962 more book reviews
Youve all felt it at one point or another. The desire. The craving. The urge to go to bed with a book. The new hardcover whose jacket youve taken off for safekeeping; falling asleep with one hand splayed over its naked, embossed cover. An old favorite, its edges worn and soft to the touch; it fits perfectly in the space beside you on your wrinkled sheets.

At around 700 pages, THE NAME OF THE WIND is the perfect shape and story to sleep with.

(At least, I assume it would be, as I read this on an e-reader.)

Even without the tangible reassurance of a physical copy, THE NAME OF THE WIND easily slid into its position as my new favorite book. Somewhere in an alternate universe, J. K. Rowling and George R. R. Martin had a literary lovechild, who somehow stowed away on a ship bound for Earth, assumed the human name of Patrick Rothfuss, and, after wandering, bard-like, through many years of higher education, discovered the secret to turning words and ideas into gold.

Remember those sleepaway camps and public library programs you attended when you were young, the ones where the performer would gather you and the other kids round the sleepy campfire or colorful hand-sewn rug? Remember how, at first, you were suspicious of this stranger with the odd hair or scruffy beard or clothing that audibly ruffled whenever he shifted positions? Remember how his voice sounded unfamiliar at first, unlike the dulcet tones of your own parents telling you bedtime stories? And then remember how, before you knew it, you were so far immersed into the story you forgot who was telling it and found yourself leaning forward, hanging on to his every mesmerizing word?

Thats kind of how THE NAME OF THE WIND was for me. The third-person beginning section was a little awkward, as I wasnt sure how I was supposed to feel about this Kote/Kvothe character. But as Kvothe stretched out his long-unused storytelling muscles and the book eased its loving way into first-person narration, I found myself as entranced as Chronicler and Bast were, sitting in that inn and listening to the never-before-told story of a contemporary legend.

He has a sexy voice, what can I say?

I could mention some minor quibbles I had with the book, like Kvothes unfortunate near-perfect-ness, or how Denna skirts the edge of geeky-adolescent-boys MPDG wet dream, but it totally and completely doesnt even matter because dont you know that the greatest artists can break all the rules? THE NAME OF THE WIND is an epic novel, part memoir, part boarding school tale, part wild adventure, and I just know that Kvothes world is only going to expand from here in future installments. Recommended for anyone and everyone anywhereexcept for maybe that hipster classmate of yours with the I-just-got-out-of-bed-no-really-I-just-did messy hair and black Free Trade coffee perpetually in hand who refuses to read anything that hasnt won the Nobel, Pulitzer, or Man Booker Prize. But who wants to be reading buddies with them anyway?
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 606 more book reviews
Really wonderful epic fantasy. At times part Artful Dodger, part Harry Potter, part Game of Thrones. I loved it, but it does leave us needing to read the next.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on
Excellent Read. Throughly enjoyed this book and can't wait to get through the 2nd one and for when the 3rd comes out. The writing is superb and very well done. Puts you in the place and time with the characters.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on
Mesmerizing. Wonderful story, well told. Can't wait for the next one.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 6 more book reviews
SI FI SAGA WORTH READING IF YOU LIKE SI FI
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 900 more book reviews
It's difficult to tell someone else why you really like a book. I didn't just like this one, I loved it. The story is novel, the hero is wonderfully complex and intelligent and the fantasy is so appealing that nearly every chapter is interesting. Only once did I feel as if the author might have been getting tired and wrote too much about insignificant issues. This is not true with many other books I have read and my only disappointment was the ending which did leave me hanging so I would go on to the sequel which I will without a doubt in spite of its over 1,000 pages. Kvothe, the read-haired hero, tells the story in his own way. At first, this bothered me, that is, until I became caught up in his tale. If you like fantasy, don't just plan to read this novel, do so as soon as you can.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on
This is the best book I have read this year. I can't wait for the next one. I think it is out in hardback.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 66 more book reviews
Really enjoyed this excellent book! It is long - 23 cd's - but I hated to see it end and look forward to starting the next book of the trilogy. Even with the length, I did not feel it dragged. The book is beautifully written, completely captivating and wonderfully narrated. Definitely among my new favorite books! Completely recommend!
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 193 more book reviews
Loved it! Excellent fantacy story. First of a trilogy. Immediately captivated me. Story of the main character is being related to a story scribe by the now old man. Character is flawed like real life; magic is believable; story has an excellent flow. I will read this again. I can't wait to get a hold of the next book. And can't wait for the final book to be written.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on
Fantastic fantasy book told almost like a mystery you piece together as you go. The main character is compelling and believable. A spellbinding read!
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on + 18 more book reviews
This is the best book of its kind. Period. I'll buy the next in the series in hardback as soon as it is published.

Having said that, I found the first 70 pages slow. After rereading (something I rarely do) the book, I understand the beginning, but the story really grabbed me after 70 pages and then I couldn't put it down.
reviewed The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicles, Bk 1) on
Words can't even describe how amazingly epic this book is. The only negative I can think of, is that you must wait for the 2 sequels!