Book Reviews of Necroscope

Necroscope
Necroscope
Author: Brian Lumley
ISBN-13: 9780812521665
ISBN-10: 0812521668
Publication Date: 9/15/1988
Pages: 505
Rating:
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 30

3.7 stars, based on 30 ratings
Publisher: Tor Books
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

14 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Necroscope on + 58 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
Excellent story - not quite what I expected (I thought it was all about evil vampires - they're only a tiny part of the story) but so excellent!
reviewed Necroscope on
Helpful Score: 3
This book is a genre bender. I would warn you that there is graphic violent and sexual content. The book mixes cold-war, espionage, esp, and vampires. This works and is very cool.
reviewed Necroscope on + 6 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
not so much a vampire book, really enjoyed it! The others in the series will have more to do with vampires I am sure and I am looking forward to them, this is just a good kind of creepy read...with an ending I should have seen coming but I didn't.
reviewed Necroscope on + 228 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This is my first Lumley book. Very good take on the vampire. He adds in Cold War espionage from a supernatural perspective. I'll be reading more in this series! Good Characters!
reviewed Necroscope on
Helpful Score: 2
The premise of the book is fascinating, but the writing isn't all that great. I felt like there were a lot of cliche expressions and near the end I felt the author pulled a Deus ex machina. The main character (Harry) just seems to rely on answers landing in his lap that I didn't ever feel that he was ever in serious jeopardy.

I'm really not sure I want to plod through the next title of the series if it is going to be as mediocre this one was.
reviewed Necroscope on + 3 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I loved this book. It is a wonderful adaptation of the vampire mythology along with several other supernatural powers weaved in. It is a thrilling story that kept me interested all the way through.
reviewed Necroscope on + 35 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A story with a character that can talk to the dead, one that can extract the dead's secrets, one that can give the "evil eye", a vampire, zombies, British and Russian secret agencies that employ agents with all sorts of ESP talents, and a sci-fi space/time continuum all set in the middle of the Cold War. How can Lumley pack so much goodness in 500 pages?

Necroscope is the book that started a horror series franchise before horror series were considered the norm. Lumley crafts a tale that was revolutionary for its time. Shades of Lovecraft permeate through the story as we get to know the protagonist, Harry Keough and antagonist, Boris Dragosani. Harry is a teenager in Great Britain who is learning to use his newfound ability, talking to the dead, and we get to watch the young necroscope learn and grow through the first two-thirds of the book. At the same time, we're introduced to Dragosani, a Romainian who works for the secret Soviet ESP agency. Boris is a necromancer and has the ability to extract secrets from the dead through gruesome mutilations. He also returns to his homeland in Wallachia every year to talk to the mysterious corpse buried in the mountains that gave him his unique ability. The story unfolds as we watch the two learn to harness their abilities and leads towards their eventual showdown.

The setting is the 1970s and it's in the middle of the Cold War and for anyone that grew up during this time, it adds an extra dose of suspicious unease throughout the story. Lumley does a wonderful job setting up the characters in a way that demands you to keep turning the pages. There are so many interesting ideas explored in Necroscope that only scratch the surface. I only hope that the rest of the books in the series delves into each and every one of them much, much further.
reviewed Necroscope on + 88 more book reviews
my favorite vampires since anne rice, though these are of a completely more ghastly and terrible nature. Harry Keogh is a great brooding, sci-fi hero who can speak to the dead. After we get his life story, the real plot begins and we get to see some nasty evil beings, USSR vs UK action, and wolf-headed wamhyri! lumley made me love gory creatures, otherworldly monsters and ultimately HP Lovecraft.
reviewed Necroscope on + 224 more book reviews
This is the first book i have read by this author.
will be reading many more. Awesome read.
reviewed Necroscope on + 14 more book reviews
Good Horror
reviewed Necroscope on + 2 more book reviews
I didn't feel that the book was written all that well.It seemed a little too fantastical to me. As much as I adore vampire novels, like Forests of the Night, this one wasn't one of my personal favorites.
reviewed Necroscope on + 9 more book reviews
A very different take on vampires and the supernatural. Very well written and a fun read overall. I especially liked the "science" behind everything.
reviewed Necroscope on + 150 more book reviews
somewhat tedious in spots but necessary in laying history for rest of series.
reviewed Necroscope on + 35 more book reviews
A story with a character that can talk to the dead, one that can extract the dead's secrets, one that can give the "evil eye", a vampire, zombies, British and Russian secret agencies that employ agents with all sorts of ESP talents, and a sci-fi space/time continuum all set in the middle of the Cold War. How can Lumley pack so much goodness in 500 pages?

Necroscope is the book that started a horror series franchise before horror series were considered the norm. Lumley crafts a tale that was revolutionary for its time. Shades of Lovecraft permeate through the story as we get to know the protagonist, Harry Keough and antagonist, Boris Dragosani. Harry is a teenager in Great Britain who is learning to use his newfound ability, talking to the dead, and we get to watch the young necroscope learn and grow through the first two-thirds of the book. At the same time, we're introduced to Dragosani, a Romainian who works for the secret Soviet ESP agency. Boris is a necromancer and has the ability to extract secrets from the dead through gruesome mutilations. He also returns to his homeland in Wallachia every year to talk to the mysterious corpse buried in the mountains that gave him his unique ability. The story unfolds as we watch the two learn to harness their abilities and leads towards their eventual showdown.

The setting is the 1970s and it's in the middle of the Cold War and for anyone that grew up during this time, it adds an extra dose of suspicious unease throughout the story. Lumley does a wonderful job setting up the characters in a way that demands you to keep turning the pages. There are so many interesting ideas explored in Necroscope that only scratch the surface. I only hope that the rest of the books in the series delves into each and every one of them much, much further.