Book Reviews of The New Girls

The New Girls
The New Girls
Author: Beth Gutcheon
ISBN-13: 9780060977023
ISBN-10: 0060977027
Publication Date: 6/19/1996
Pages: 352
Rating:
  • Currently 3.1/5 Stars.
 26

3.1 stars, based on 26 ratings
Publisher: Perennial
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

7 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The New Girls on + 80 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
Not my favorite Beth Gutcheon, but not bad if you grew up in the 60's. One thing I came away with -- girls were girls regardless of socioeconomic factors. I didn't grow up anywhere near the economic class these girls were in, but still saw my friends and I in many of their conflicts with growing up.
reviewed The New Girls on + 179 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
I kept waiting for the plot devices to kick in, but no pay off. There was so much more potenital and it just fell flat for me. Surprising as the characters were believable and the settings excellent. I just felt let down that in the end, it just seemed like a story about some rich girls and their time at prep school in the 60's and nothing particularly special.
reviewed The New Girls on + 16 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
My favorite book this year. Intelligent without being presumptious, sentimental and smart.
reviewed The New Girls on + 54 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Great read about a group of affluent, yet diverse girls at a prep school in the 60's and their subsequent reunion.
reviewed The New Girls on + 28 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Very enjoyable book. The characters, the time period, and the private school settings all make for a great story.
reviewed The New Girls on + 18 more book reviews
story of young girls at boarding school...good
reviewed The New Girls on + 114 more book reviews
The New Girls is a resonant, engrossing novel about five girls during their formative prep-school years in the tumultuous mid-sixties. Into their reality of first-class trips to Europe, resort vacations, and deb parties enter the Vietnam War, the women's movement, and the sexual revolution. As the old traditions collide with the new society, the girls lose their innocence, develop a social conscience, and discover their sexuality--blossoming into women shaped by their turbulent times.