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Topic: It's October, whatcha reading?

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Subject: It's October, whatcha reading?
Date Posted: 10/1/2011 8:18 AM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
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The Millionaire's Daughter by Dorothy Eden.

Date Posted: 10/1/2011 11:14 AM ET
Member Since: 7/22/2009
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Finished Kaye's The Far Pavilions yesterday (just behind Sharla).  It's one of those sweeping HF epic stories that has it all -- love, war, adventure, heroism. Long but well-worth it.

A copy of Raybourn's The Dark Enquiry arrived on my doorstep yesterday thanks to a kind PBS member -- so that seemed like the perfect book to pick up this morning and start reading. Always happy to spend time with Brisbane.smiley

Date Posted: 10/1/2011 11:32 AM ET
Member Since: 5/31/2009
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Scarlet and Tuck by Stephen R. Lawhead for HF challenge.  I really like the character of Will Scarlet.  Will Scatlocke lost his home and his livelihood with the coming of William the Red to the throne. As he travels, working to feed and house himself he hears about King Raven, a robber of the wealthy, who shares what he gets with those who have little or nothing. The story is told largely by Will who becomes Will Scarlet when he joins King Raven's band. He is accepted after a bow duel with Raven himself. Raven beats him by a hair but welcomes him into the group anyway. As they strive to win back Raven's throne, they encounter the wrath of Abbott Hugo who has lofty ambitions, Count de Broase, who rules Raven's lands and people, and Richard de Glanville, the cruel sheriff of the March. In a daring raid, Will is captured and thrown into prison where he make a friend of a Monk named Odo who interviews him day after day. It is only when Will goes to the gallows that he realizes how tenuous his existence really is. The character of Will Scarlet is complex, likable and loyal. And, the book includes a wonderfully inspiring romance between Will and Noin who at last find a way to be wed. The tale is long and convoluted but fascinating. Recommend this one to anyone interested in the story of Robin Hood but do read the first in the series, Hood, before reading Scarlet.  Enjoyed Tuck a great deal but not as much as Scarlet.  Tuck is a gentle, pious man who believes in justice and fairness.  He tells the story in his own way.  I felt that Lawhead had a little trouble getting into this character.  Perhaps it's my imagination but I thought that he seemed more attuned to Will Scarlet!  It was fun to read about the battles and how the long bow could stand against knights with swords and horses.  Thank you Mr. Lawhead for more information about that topic at the end of the novel.  However, anyone who reads this series should certainly finish with Tuck as it wraps up the story so delightfully well.  And, now on to Arthur by Lawhead for the HF Challenge.

The Red Queen by Philippa Gregory is done.  Thank you Dee for lending it to me to read.  I didn't think it was as good as The Constant Princess, my favority Gregory novel.  

The Turquoise by Anya Seton, one of my favorite authors, for the HF challenge.  My heartfelt thanks to whoever on this thread sent it to me.  I appreciate it very much.  Passed my unpostable copy to my daughter who cherishes the copy of Katherine by Seton that I read.    I find Seton's writing so enjoyable because she has strong and independent female characters.  The Turquoise is no exception as she tells the compelling tale of Santa Fey Cameron, whose heritage is the unlikely combination of Scottish and Spanish parents.  When her father dies, leaving her orphaned she lives with a poor Mexican family.  To escape this life Fey marries Terry Dillon, a handsome Irish rogue, only to be abandoned in New York, pregnant and alone. She finds a friend in Dr. Rachel at a clinic for young women with no resources.  Fey is determined to make a life for herself and her child and sets her goal to marry Simeon Tower, one of the richest men in the country.  Financially successful, he is afraid of women due to an early demeaning experience. But Fey overcomes his fears and marries him to make a new life for herself and her daughter.  Together they work to make a new life, socially and economically, striving to rise from their humble backgrounds and become part of the elite wealthy in New York.  However, as they approach their goal, Terry reappears and blackmails Simeon.  The story escalates from this point as Simeon lose his wealth and their friends fade away.  This was indeed a good story - sad but realistic.  Good one!   

Becoming Marie Antoinette by Juliet Grey.  The first half was a bit slow but I liked the second half.  Having just read reviews of this book on another site I find that I might just be in the minority.  Yes, I liked the key character.  The author does an excellent job of creating a character with which the reader can identify.  However, I felt that the book dragged in the first half.  The details about training to become the dauphine of France, wife of the future king seemed too extensive to me.  My first thought was that the author was lengthening the book so she could get three books instead of two or one.  However, the last half was much more interesting as the reader walks with 'Toinette through the politically charged French court.  No matter what she does she is criticized by someone.  And, when the king dies, the scenes are emotionally realistic.  Will I read the next two in this trilogy?  I'm not sure at this point.   

Finished Druids by Morgan Llywelyn for the HF challenge.  Found this book was a very good experience as I learned so much about Druids and the Gaul tribes.  Did not realize how that the Gaul territory was so large encompassing a good many countries including France, Belguim, and parts of several others.  Prince Vercingetorix was a charasmatic leader who united the tribes in a hope to repel the Roman invaders.  Llywelyn does a wonderful job of creating characters - both Druids, warriors and family members.   Good read indeed.  Also read The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane by Katherine Howe for the mystery challenge, a delightful story about witches, love and a greedy man.  And, I read Three for the Chair by Rex Stout for the mystery challenge.

Now reading Eragon by Christopher Paolini for the YA challenge, Blood and Iron by Elizabeth Bear for the fantasy challenge.  Completsed Mayflower by Nathaniel Philbrick, given to me by my daughter, a most enlightening read about the Puritans and Pilgrims and settlement of our country and the settlers' interaction with the Indian population living here.  Read Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel for the contemporary challenge.  What a fun read!  Almost as much frun as the moviie.  Did Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb because I have always wanted to read it.  Enjoyed it so much that I ordered the next two in the series.  Finished Redwall by Brian Jacques and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J. K. Rowling for the YA challenge.  Had wanted to both for some time to see if it is appropriate for my grandchildren.  Also finished Living When A Loved One Has Died by Earl A. Grollman.  This little book has much for those of us who have lost someone recently.  It is written in verse, divided into four sections:  Shock, Suffering, Recovery and A New Life.  While l've finished it I will probably go back and read them again.  So much is packed into this little volume that helps one understand one's reactions and feelings.  And for the mystery challenge I read Still Life by Louise Penny - wonderful mystery, as well as Murder at Hazelmoor by Agatha Christie, good good read.  In process for the fantasy challenge:  Kushiel's Dart by Jacqueline Carey. 

 



Last Edited on: 10/31/11 10:28 PM ET - Total times edited: 42
Date Posted: 10/1/2011 11:53 AM ET
Member Since: 8/17/2009
Posts: 1,588
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I haven't started yet, but up next on my list is Anya Seton's The Winthrop Woman.  It's my North America entry in It's a Small World and Around the World in 80 Days.

Date Posted: 10/1/2011 2:42 PM ET
Member Since: 9/28/2005
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Sharla, I loved the Winthrop Woman.  I finished If I ever return for you sweet Peggy-O.  A contemporary mystery by Sharyn McCrumb.  It was ok.  Next up is either the Ballad of Tom Dooley or Caleb's Crossing.

Alice J. (ASJ) - ,
Date Posted: 10/1/2011 8:27 PM ET
Member Since: 5/13/2009
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Sharla I loved Winthrop Women one of my alltime favorites.

I just finished a historical mystery, Anne Perry's Paragon Walk set in Victorian England. With completing that book I finished the 2011 Mystery challenge in the Mystery Forum.

For those who like books set in Victorian England, Ms Perry does a good job with capturing the feel for the Era. Mysteries are good although I can't read many of them in a row because I think they are too similar.

Happy October everyone.

Date Posted: 10/1/2011 11:53 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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Becoming Marie Antoinette by Juliet Grey.   REK I will be interested to see what you think of this.



 

Date Posted: 10/2/2011 8:28 AM ET
Member Since: 3/8/2009
Posts: 6,035
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Working my way through Madame Tussaud.  Enjoying it so far.  Between the French revolution and the wax modeling stuff, there is lots of new info for me here.  I'm not bonding with Marie yet, but I think will eventually.

Date Posted: 10/2/2011 8:39 AM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
Posts: 4,035
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I'm not touching the Juliet Grey subject thankyouverymuch.

Finished the Dorothy Eden book. OK, but she's done better and her big *surprise* written in the 1970's was pretty darned easy to spot a mile away in today's more jaded outlook. Starting The Summer Day is Done by R.T. Stevens. Last days of Tsarist Russia. Read a few pages last night and that writing was looking awfully good.

Date Posted: 10/2/2011 8:54 AM ET
Member Since: 5/19/2007
Posts: 4,709
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Cathy, I swear you are re-reading every book I read in the mid to late 70's!  I loved Summer Day.  You are really taking me back!  wink

I'm heading for my coffee maker and the last 40 pages of Whiskey River.  Then I'm going to look for my 1900's book...It just may be Jitterbug, also by Estleman.

Date Posted: 10/2/2011 9:49 AM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
Posts: 4,035
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Vicky, too wild. I spotted Summer Day on a list at Goodreads and had to have it. Just came Friday via interlibrary loan. It sounds very good.

Date Posted: 10/2/2011 9:50 AM ET
Member Since: 1/24/2009
Posts: 9,496
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I'm getting ready to read Death Cloud by Andrew Lane.....a YA HF Mystery based on a young Sherlock Holmes. 

Date Posted: 10/3/2011 11:28 AM ET
Member Since: 10/6/2007
Posts: 3,101
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Okay --- so it is a  new month and I just posted a note in the September thread!!!  All afternoon yesterday as I sat watching football I wondered by no one had any news to post (silly me).  Thanks to Jeanne I now know it is a new month!!

I finally finished "Mary Sutter" and found it to be a good read --- not the best I've ever read, but pretty informative on certains aspects of the Civil War.  Now I am reading an Ellery Queen for the Mystery Challenge --- I think I have only two more to go for that Challenge.

Alice, I love the Thomas & Charlotte Pitt books by Anne Perry, but do agree with you a solid run of them would get a bit boring. 

Now that I have so many endorsements for "The Winthrop Woman" I may have to get that one onto my shelf!!!

Date Posted: 10/3/2011 11:54 AM ET
Member Since: 2/2/2010
Posts: 1,206
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Grave Goods - I am totally sucked in, I have it on my desk here at work right now looking for a chance to read  some!  (Don't tell my boss!)

Date Posted: 10/3/2011 1:02 PM ET
Member Since: 10/6/2007
Posts: 3,101
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Like Vicky, I am reliving my youth with some of the books you all are reading!!!  On that note, have those of you whom are reading older historical/romance books read "Forever Amber" by Kathleen Winsor???  It is one of my favorites from the "good old days".  It was written in 1944 and was banned in Boston at the time --- it is a wonderful book.  I highly recommend it.

Date Posted: 10/3/2011 2:25 PM ET
Member Since: 8/29/2008
Posts: 267
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I have been reading I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith. It has't really hooked me yet, so I may put it down. I'm in the mood for something a little faster paced.

Date Posted: 10/3/2011 5:09 PM ET
Member Since: 7/22/2009
Posts: 2,617
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Finished The Dark Enquiry by Raybourn yesterday -- it was fun and enjoyable. (Ah, Brisbane...)

Now reading Major Pettigrew's Last Stand for my book club.

Date Posted: 10/3/2011 7:08 PM ET
Member Since: 3/23/2008
Posts: 2,458
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Becky:  I loved Forever Amber too!  I remember thinking that it was quite naughty at the time.

Date Posted: 10/3/2011 7:57 PM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
Posts: 4,035
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I love Forever Amber. Quite scandalous in its day, it is very tame by our standards today. Amber gets around the beds and the men, but it is all behind closed doors.

Date Posted: 10/4/2011 3:25 AM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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I just down loaded Lionheart! As much as I dig getting a book on my Nook is still lacks the satifaction of holding the real thing.

Date Posted: 10/4/2011 2:16 PM ET
Member Since: 6/5/2007
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"I Capture the Castle" never captured me either.  I have heard so many rave about it, but I thought it was just "eh" 

Date Posted: 10/4/2011 2:32 PM ET
Member Since: 6/5/2007
Posts: 2,507
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For Australia, I'm working on "Harp in the South" by Ruth Park.  I just started this morning on the treadmill, but I'm enjoying it so far. It reminds me of "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn"

Subject: I Capture the Castle
Date Posted: 10/4/2011 2:54 PM ET
Member Since: 2/2/2010
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As far as "I Capture the Castle", I cheated and saw the movie on Netflix, I couldn't image how the book could have been so great.

Date Posted: 10/4/2011 6:11 PM ET
Member Since: 8/29/2008
Posts: 267
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Okay, you guys are making feel better about setting aside I Capture the Castle. I thought maybe there was something wrong with me since everyone seems to love it. I saw the movie already and thought the it was okay. I was hoping the book would be better. Alright, then, on to something better!

Date Posted: 10/5/2011 8:20 AM ET
Member Since: 5/19/2007
Posts: 4,709
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Jill, I've never read Capture and thanks to you, I'm not even tempted now!  wink

I couldn't settle on anything.  Nothing was hitting my mood.  In desperation, I picked up a book called The Song of the Rainbird by Barbara Whitnell.  Never heard of it or her before.  

I'm enjoying it so far!  It takes place around 1906; young Kate Carswell is ready to sail for British East Africa to meet Edward, her fiancee.  Her father, Rev. Carswell, is not pleased with Edward, Kate, any of her decisions, or life in general I suspect.  He disowns her.  She  shares a cabin with Louise, who is traveling to meet her husband.  She also befriends Meg, whose husband Hugh grows coffee.  She arrives at the dock only to be met by an official who tells her Edward has been killed in a shooting accident.  Kate is devastated, and suspicious, because she received a letter from Edward saying he had quarreled with his hunting partner Christy, an Irishman with a flash temper who leads tourists on safari.  Edward had gone along as an assistant to earn some fast money--and now Christy reports that Edward died.  

This was written in the early 1980's; it's an interesting story.  I wouldn't call it great writing, but it has certainly captured my interest.  There are hints of secrets yet to be revealed, and some sexual tension between Kate and Christy, which she won't admit.  She has decided to stay in Kenya, and is running a school for girls.  Louise's husband is turning into a scumball, which is an interesting twist too.  

Has anyone read anything by this author before?

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