Discussion Forums - Science Fiction

Topic: POLL: Top 10 SF/Fantasy novels of the 2000s? *VOTING CLOSED*

Club rule - Please, if you cannot be courteous and respectful, do not post in this forum.
Page:   Unlock Forum posting with Annual Membership.
Subject: POLL: Top 10 SF/Fantasy novels of the 2000s? *VOTING CLOSED*
Date Posted: 1/24/2010 11:34 AM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
Back To Top

**VOTING IS NOW CLOSED**
Results will be posted on 2/4/10.


I am conducting another non-scientific poll! In this one, I am asking what you thought the best science fiction and fantasy novels of the 2000s were. You can vote for up to ten (please put them in the order you prefer, as I am using a weighted system to compile the votes) and the only restrictions are the the novel must have been published between Jan. 1st 2000 and Dec. 31st 2009. Voting will be open for ten days, and once I've collected all the votes I will post our results! Please format your votes the way I have formatted mine below, including the first publication date:

1. Kushiel's Avatar, by Jacqueline Carey (2003)
2. Farthing, by Jo Walton (2006)
3. The Curse of Chalion, by Lois McMaster Bujold (2001)
4. Alphabet of Thorn, by Patricia McKillip (2004)
5. Sunshine, by Robin McKinley (2003)
6. Hammerfall, by C.J. Cherryh (2001)
7. Matter, by Iain M. Banks (2008)
8. A Companion to Wolves, by Elizabeth Bear and Sarah Monette (2007)
9. Revelation Space, by Alastair Reynolds (2000)
10. Altered Carbon, by Richard K. Morgan (2002)



Last Edited on: 2/4/10 3:18 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Matt C. (mattc) - ,
Date Posted: 1/24/2010 4:24 PM ET
Member Since: 8/13/2008
Posts: 3,849
Back To Top

 

Vey difficult.  Going through lists from some of my favorite authors, here's what I've come up with:

 

  1. The War of the Flowers by Tad WIlliams (2003)
  2. Variable Star by Robert A. Heinlein and Spider Robinson (2006)
  3. Camouflage by Joe Haldeman (2004)
  4. For Us, The Living by Robert A. Heinlein (2003)
  5. The Coming by Joe Haldeman (2000)
  6. Night Train to Rigel by Timothy Zahn (2005)
  7. Magic Street by Orson Scott Card (2005)
  8. Dreamcatcher by Stephen King (2001)
  9. Valor's Choice by Tanya Huff (2000)
  10. Stardoc by S.L. Viehl (2000)

I know that I'm going to waver on some of these within the next five minutes, but I feel like that's a prety good list.  For the record, you are only looking at publication date right?  For Us, The Living by Heinlein was written in the late 1930s, but never published until 2003.

 

Date Posted: 1/24/2010 5:12 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
Back To Top

Yes, definitely publication date. So collections of short stories can count too, even if the stories were written pre-2000, if they weren't compiled together until 2000+.

The only book I've read off of your list is Magic Street, which would probably have been around spot 12 or so for me -- but I know my Dad enjoyed it more than I did because he's a Shakespeare buff and got all the references. You've mentioned the Timothy Zahn a couple places. . . I may have to check it out. Zahn is up and down for me, and I hadn't read Night Train to Rigel because it was marketed as YA. . .(I am a snob sometimes, sad to say.)

Matt C. (mattc) - ,
Date Posted: 1/24/2010 5:29 PM ET
Member Since: 8/13/2008
Posts: 3,849
Back To Top

OK, this time I am positive.  Night Train to Rigel is an adult book, and (at least in my area) is found in the adult section of the library or bookstore.  It doesn't have sex or graphic violence, so I can see where it might be recommended for kids, but it is definitely an adult SF/mystery. 

Are you sure you aren't confusing it with the Dragonback series?  Those are definitely YA.

 

ETA - I am also a Shakespeare buff, and A Midsummer Night's Dream is my favorite play, so Magic Street was pretty neat...though for both Card and Zahn, my favorite of their individual works came prior to 2000.



Last Edited on: 1/24/10 5:39 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Subject: Tom Hl's top ten of the 2000s
Date Posted: 1/24/2010 6:09 PM ET
Member Since: 3/25/2006
Posts: 723
Back To Top
  1. Passage, by Connie Willis (2001)
  2. The Years of Rice and Salt, by Kim Stanley Robinson (2002)
  3. Chindi, by Jack McDevitt (2002)
  4. Glasshouse, by Charles Stross (2006)
  5. The Yiddish Policeman's Union, by Michael Chabon (2007)
  6. The Scar, by China Mieville (2002)
  7. Blind Lake, by Robert Charles Wilson (2003)
  8. Rainbow's End, by Vernor Vinge (2006)
  9. Cosmonaut Keep, by Ken MacLeod (2000)
  10. Camouflage, by Joe Haldeman (2004)

   - edited to add year of publication



Last Edited on: 1/24/10 7:42 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 1/24/2010 6:45 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
Back To Top

Matt: I am positive I'm not confusing it with the Dragonback series. . . but it may just be that the cover seemed teen oriented to me, and I never got past the cover. . . And actually, could it maybe be the same cover artist as in the Dragonback books? They have the same feel to me. . . but my favorite Card and Zahn books are all pre-2000 too.

Tom: Thanks for your votes, even though you didn't include the year. . . :P Passage would have been #11 on my list, had my list extended past ten books. . . but like with Matt, I've only read that one book on your list! Though I did just acquire a copy of The Yiddish Policeman's Union, so I'll be reading it at some point. . .

Subject: top tens
Date Posted: 1/24/2010 7:47 PM ET
Member Since: 3/25/2006
Posts: 723
Back To Top

PhoenixFalls,

I had about 30 favorites from the 2000s, and it was tough to put them in order.  My other 20 are of a similar nature to the first ten.  I haven't read any of your ten favorites. 

Matt,

It looks like we overlap on Camouflage - but that's about all.  I haven't read those others.

-Tom Hl.



Last Edited on: 1/24/10 7:48 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Matt C. (mattc) - ,
Date Posted: 1/24/2010 8:18 PM ET
Member Since: 8/13/2008
Posts: 3,849
Back To Top

Camouflage was a Hugo winner wasn't it?  I figure that's the only one on my list that received much acclaim in the SF community as a whole.  Outside that one, I haven't read anything on either of your lists :(

I wanted my list to reflect a decent range of authors, but I did consider six of Haldeman's other books, which would be somewhere on my "best of the decade" list...he is probably my favorite living SF author (since Heinlein is dead).

Date Posted: 1/24/2010 8:56 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
Back To Top

Camouglage won the Nebula, not the Hugo.

I haven't read an Haldeman. . . keep meaning to get around to The Forever War one of these days. . .

In regards to critical recognition, my list doesn't do too badly, but they're the *ahem* the lesser awards -- one Mythopoeic Award winner and two nominees; two Campbell Memorial Award nominees and Campbell Best New Writer; one Philip K. Dick Award winner; and one book nominated for the World Fantasy Award, Locus Award, and (finally!) the Hugo Award. But looking at the lists of Hugo and Nebula nominees for the 2000s, I wasn't even interested in most of them, and I have a poor opinion of a couple, so I guess my tastes just don't overlap with their judging panels that much! :)

Date Posted: 1/24/2010 11:07 PM ET
Member Since: 9/3/2008
Posts: 447
Back To Top

Ugh so hard. I have a little overlap with other people. I only put 9 down. And I wish I had started recording book titles I've read long before now. Of the books I own, I keep thinking they are new but they were first published in the 1990's. At least I started at the new year. The reason only 9 now is that I have Name of the Wind, The Year of Rice & Salt and Rainbow's End sitting here. I'm hoping at least one of them will be read before time is up and I can put one of them in. I feel like I wasted 3 slots with the Mistborn trilogy but they all were very good.

 

1. The Eyre Affair  Jasper Fforde 2002
2. The Orphan's Tales: In The Night Garden by Catherynne M. Valente 2006
3. Camouflage Joe Haldeman 2004
4. Polaris Jack McDevitt 2005
5. The Final Empire Brandon Sanderson 2006
6. The Hero of Ages Brandon Sanderson 2008
7. The Well of Ascension Brandon Sanderson 2007
8. Od Magic Patricia McKillip 2005
9. The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse Robert Rankin 2002



Last Edited on: 1/25/10 8:48 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 1/24/2010 11:23 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
Back To Top

Well, I know that The Eyre Affair is by Jasper Fforde (books two and three were nominated by another person, but that person didn't like The Eyre Affair as much so you're the first one voting for it) but who wrote The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse? (That is a fantastic title, btw. . .)

LOL, if you thought the Brandon Sanderson books were all better than other stuff you read from this decade, then the spots weren't wasted! I will admit that I refused to put any of the other Kushiel novels on my list because I wanted Avatar there and I didn't want to repeat any authors, but that's just 'cause I'm anal like that. :) But #5: The Final Empire is Mistborn, the first book of the trilogy, right?

You are the third person to mention Camouflage. . . the only other book so far on three lists is The Curse of Chalion! Mayhap I shall have to check it out. . .

Thanks for voting, and I'll keep an eye out for #10 from you! But what happens if you think the book you read deserves to be higher than #10? ;)



Last Edited on: 1/24/10 11:28 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 1/25/2010 8:47 AM ET
Member Since: 9/3/2008
Posts: 447
Back To Top

If the book happens to rank higher than 10 I will apologise profusely for messing your spreadsheet up! Robert Rankin wrote bunnies -sorry I forgot some authors. It is another comedy Tom Holtish maybe odd but clever. I read quite a few comedy SF books in the past few years.

The only problem with putting all 3 in the series is that IF I knew other books I had read that were written in the 2000's, (*banging head* for not writing down books I read) I probably would replace at least one. It seems like I have several paperbacks I really enjoyed but the hardback was first published in 1999 or 1998.

Quite a few of the Hugo winners for this time period I either didn't like or wasn't thouroughly impressed with. Darwin's Radio is one. It was good and I appreciate the writing but not a contender for top 10. Orphans of Chaos was another. I really don't understand how that one got in there.

And now from the lists above I have even more books I want to read...

OT:  How is Iain pronounced?  Is it like Ian or is the ain aye n



Last Edited on: 1/25/10 8:52 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Matt C. (mattc) - ,
Date Posted: 1/25/2010 11:27 AM ET
Member Since: 8/13/2008
Posts: 3,849
Back To Top

Iain is just the Scottish spelling of Ian, but is prononced the same (at least according to a Scottish pastor I knew who had a grandson named Iain).

Date Posted: 1/25/2010 3:25 PM ET
Member Since: 9/3/2008
Posts: 447
Back To Top

Thanks Matt -

I have seen Iain more and more lately so I was wondering. 

And Phoenix -heads up I also just got War of the Flowers in the mail today (beautiful copy!) BUT I decided I will read The Years of Rice & Salt first (after I finish the Unlikely Ones and maybe before I try Something Wicked This Way Comes) So shortly you will have a proper list (maybe you shouldn't tally me up until the end!)  I do have to go to a wrestling match tomorrow night so I can get a good amount of reading done...

Date Posted: 1/25/2010 5:09 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
Back To Top

Booooo! Hiss!!!!

Of course I've already tallied your 1-9 votes. . . so if you do move things around, post the list separately rather than editing your original list, please, so I can compare them to make the adjustments! :)

Date Posted: 1/25/2010 5:12 PM ET
Member Since: 10/31/2009
Posts: 84
Back To Top

"I feel like I wasted 3 slots with the Mistborn trilogy but they all were very good."

I would hardly say wasted.  I have The Final Empire and The Hero of Ages both on my list as well (my list is 90% fantasy so I posted over in the fantasy forum version of this thread).

Subject: ranking
Date Posted: 1/26/2010 12:05 AM ET
Member Since: 7/26/2006
Posts: 385
Back To Top

I can't do it.  For me, you're asking the top 10 out of approx 900 ott books.  I didn't start keeping a journal until 2006.  At any rate, I just can't do it.

:/



Last Edited on: 1/26/10 12:11 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 1/26/2010 12:24 AM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
Back To Top

Alison: But if they're really the top ten, shouldn't you remember them even amongst the 900? LOL, no worries. . . and that is an impressive total! If you cut out the re-reads, I don't think I've read even a quarter of that number in the past decade. . . but I blame school. All that philosophy left no room for fiction, I'm sad to say. . . :)

Subject: reading
Date Posted: 1/26/2010 12:33 AM ET
Member Since: 7/26/2006
Posts: 385
Back To Top

I pretty much read 2 books a week.  I think I'm an average reader, 'specially when compared to other people on the forums. 

_____________________________________________________________

edit - Yah I know they weren't all from the 2000 decade, but eek, too much work to look up pub dates.  I'd rather be reading.



Last Edited on: 1/26/10 1:27 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 2/1/2010 11:13 PM ET
Member Since: 9/3/2008
Posts: 447
Back To Top

Hey Phoenix Lucky You!

I'm not going to finish The Years of Rice and Salt by Feb 3 so go with my list as it stands.  I am having a hard time finding time to read right now.  Maybe we'll get snowed in this weekend.

And Alison I agree it was really hard to pick 10 books I guess it could be a good thing (in this one particular instance)  I didn't start keeping a record until this year.

Date Posted: 2/3/2010 10:45 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
Back To Top

Only a little over four hours before I close this poll! Get your votes in while you can!

Subject: ** RESULTS! **
Date Posted: 2/5/2010 12:28 AM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
Back To Top

Here are the top 25 books of the 2000s, based on your votes. There were quite a few ties. . .

 

1. A Storm of Swords, by George R.R. Martin (2000)

2. American Gods, by Neil Gaiman (2001)

   Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, by Susanna Clarke (2004)

4. The Curse of Chalion, by Lois McMaster Bujold (2001)

    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, by J.K. Rowling (2007)

6. The Orphan's Tales: In the Night Garden, by Catherynne M. Valente (2006)

7. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, by J.K. Rowling (2000)

    The Name of the Wind, by Patrick Rothfuss (2007)

9. Perdido Street Station, by China Mieville (2000)

10. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, by J.K. Rowling (2005)

11. Diplomatic Immunity, by Lois McMaster Bujold (2002)

     Oryx and Crake, by Margaret Atwood (2003)

13. Anathem, by Neal Stephenson (2008)

     Farthing, by Jo Walton (2006)

     A Feast for Crows, by George R.R. Martin (2005)

     The Wizard, by Gene Wolfe (2004)

17. Camouflage, by Joe Haldeman (2004)

      Passage, by Connie Willis (2001)

19. Night Watch, by Terry Pratchett (2002)

      Revelation Space, by Alastair Reynolds (2000)

21. Kushiel's Dart, by Jacqueline Carey (2001)

      Sunshine, by Robin McKinley (2003)

23. The Blade Itself, by Joe Abercrombie (2006)

      Mistborn: The Final Empire, by Brandon Sanderson (2006)

      The Prince of Nothing: The Darkness that Comes Before, by R. Scott Bakker (2003)

Subject: ** MORE RESULTS! **
Date Posted: 2/5/2010 12:29 AM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
Back To Top

And I noticed a lot of authors had multiple books nominated. . . enough that I suspected they were taking votes away from themselves. . . so here are the top 10 authors of the 2000s:

1. J.K. Rowling (49 points/4 titles)

2. Lois McMaster Bujold (45 points/6 titles)

3. Neil Gaiman (44.5 points/7 titles)

4. George R.R. Martin (41.5 points/only 2 titles)(He had the highest points/book average, obviously)

5. China Mieville (18.5 points/3 titles)

6. Terry Pratchett (17 points/4 titles)

7. Brandon Sanderson (15 points/3 titles)

8. Jasper Fforde (14.5 points/3 titles)

9. Gene Wolfe (14 points/2 titles)

10. Jacqueline Carey (13.5 points/3 titles)

Date Posted: 2/5/2010 6:17 PM ET
Member Since: 9/3/2008
Posts: 447
Back To Top

I'm surprised JK Rowling had so many votes -Although this is simply a 'favorite' poll.  I was also surprised she got nominated for some SF Fantasy award (was it hugo? Nebula?)  She had a good idea for a general plot and a neat setting and most importantly great media coverage.  But I feel she's not that great a writer and the later books reflect that more obviously.   That's just my opinion.  I wasn't immune.  I read them along with everyone else.  Don't attack...

Date Posted: 2/5/2010 7:22 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
Back To Top

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire won the Hugo. . . I'm afraid I can't comment on whether or not I thought that was deserved; I worked at a bookstore during the height of the Harry Potter craze, so I developed a major allergy to the books and never read them. . . ;)

Page: