Book Reviews of A Passage to India

A Passage to India
A Passage to India
Author: E.M. Forster
ISBN-13: 9780141183107
ISBN-10: 0141183101
Publication Date: 5/25/2000
Rating:
  • Currently 4.4/5 Stars.
 5

4.4 stars, based on 5 ratings
Publisher: Gardners Books
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

14 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed A Passage to India on + 33 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A window into other cultures, another time. Less entertaining than educational. But interesting none the less.
reviewed A Passage to India on
Helpful Score: 1
A classic of the conflict between colonizer and the colonized in British India.
reviewed A Passage to India on + 5 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
slow, very little plot. you do learn about India in the 1920's though.
reviewed A Passage to India on + 813 more book reviews
I thought that the first part was slow and rather uneventful. A Muslim doctor is apparently friendly to many Anglos. In it he exposes the kaleidoscope of an ethnic, racial, cultural, and religious society that was India in the early 1900s, the dominance of the Anglo culture and their attitude towards the native Indians. Beyond the Indian social caste of birthright and occupation, there is also one of religious caste. The second part brings the true Anglo-Indian relations to a head. When the doctor is falsely accused of assaulting an Anglo woman, they turn tail and show their true colors. They rally round the (British) flag so to speak. All of the underlying bias and superiority of the British is exposed. Through this the doctor retains only one Anglo friend; however, the ordeal and the trial have strained their relationship. In part three, we see that all personal and cultural relationships have been unalterable strained.
reviewed A Passage to India on + 15 more book reviews
What really happened in the Marabar caves? This is the mystery at the heart of E.M. Forster's 1924 novel, A Passage to India, the puzzle that sets in motion events highlighting an even larger question: Can an Englishman and an Indian be friends?

Written while England was still firmly in control of India, Forster's novel follows the fortunes of three English newcomers to India--Miss Adela Quested, Mrs. Moore, and Cyril Fielding--and the Indian, Dr. Aziz, with whom they cross destinies. The idea of true friendship between the races was a radical one in Forster's time, and he makes it abundantly clear that it was not one that either side welcomed. If Aziz's friend, Hamidullah, believed it impossible, the British representatives of the Raj were equally discouraging

Despite their countrymen's disapproval, Miss Quested, Mrs. Moore, and Mr. Fielding are all eager to meet Indians, and in Dr. Aziz they find a perfect companion: educated, westernized, and open-minded. Slowly, the friendships ripen, especially between Aziz and Fielding. Having created the possibility of esteem based on trust and mutual affection, Forster then subjects it to the crucible of racial hatred: during a visit to the famed Marabar caves, Miss Quested accuses Dr. Aziz of sexually assaulting her, then later recants during the frenzied trial that follows. Under such circumstances, affection proves to be a very fragile commodity indeed.
Arguably Forster's greatest novel, A Passage to India limns a troubling portrait of colonialism at its worst, and is remarkable for the complexity of its characters. Here the personal becomes the political and in the breach between Aziz and his English "friends," Forster foreshadows the eventual end of the Raj.
--Alix Wilber (amazon.com review)
reviewed A Passage to India on + 471 more book reviews
Ranked among the greatest novels of the 20th century, A Passage to India is now a Major Motion Picture directed by David Lean. This classic account of the clash of cultures in British India after the turn of the century ironically reveals the menace lurking just under the surface of ordinary misunderstanding. Carefully crafted and beautifully written, this is not a book about India alone, but about all human life.
reviewed A Passage to India on + 11 more book reviews
A classic for anyone who loves to read and who aspires to write!
reviewed A Passage to India on + 5 more book reviews
An interesting tour through British colonial India.
reviewed A Passage to India on + 28 more book reviews
Excellent book
reviewed A Passage to India on + 22 more book reviews
Part of my British Lit studies. I liked it when paired w/ the movie.
reviewed A Passage to India on + 155 more book reviews
I tried to read this book, I really did. But I couldn't. Usually I can find a groove in really bad book about a third of the way in, but couldn't with this one. This is one of a dozen or so books in my life that I started and gave up on.

It was just boring and unappealing. So I set it aside then tried again. And again. Couldn't do it.

I almost always read every book that I start. I'm a three to four book a week reader and have been for decades.

Now I know what you are going to say, life is too short, there are too many good books to read, don't force yourself to read something you don't enjoy. And I thank you for that.

Maybe when I get older and hear the wings of the angle of death fluttering above my head I'll start reading only books I like when I crack the cover. But until then, I'll "consider it a challenge before the whole human race" to read everything I start.
reviewed A Passage to India on + 26 more book reviews
loved this book!!
reviewed A Passage to India on + 982 more book reviews
The classic account of the clash of cultures in British India after the turn of the century.
reviewed A Passage to India on + 159 more book reviews
Ranked among the great novels of the twentieth century. The classic account of the clash of cultures in British India after the turn of the century. Rebecca West