Book Reviews of The Philosopher's Diet: How to Lose Weight & Change the World (Nonpareil Book, 81)

The Philosopher's Diet: How to Lose Weight & Change the World (Nonpareil Book, 81)
The Philosopher's Diet How to Lose Weight Change the World - Nonpareil Book, 81
Author: Richard A. Watson
ISBN-13: 9781567920840
ISBN-10: 1567920845
Publication Date: 4/1/1999
Pages: 109
Edition: Rev
Rating:
  • Currently 3.2/5 Stars.
 13

3.2 stars, based on 13 ratings
Publisher: David R. Godine Publisher
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

2 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Philosopher's Diet: How to Lose Weight & Change the World (Nonpareil Book, 81) on + 11 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 6
I'm probably costing myself a credit by writing this, but I almost threw this book in the recycle bin so that no one else would be subjected to it's heavy-handed, didactic, arrogant tone. The gist of the diet is eat 900 calories and run 4 miles every day and don't eat anything that comes in a box, bottle, can, or bag. Huh?
reviewed The Philosopher's Diet: How to Lose Weight & Change the World (Nonpareil Book, 81) on + 32 more book reviews
I'm right there with Linda who wants to throw this book in the recycle bin so no one else will be damaged by it. I will not be posting my own copy, because I think it would be immoral to knowingly allow someone else to read this book. Not only is the author so filled up with high self-regard he's about to pop, he hits some all-time lows of condescension: his readers are ignorant slobs, and they also lack anything in the way of values, principles, guidelines for an ethical life.

But all is OK! Because Richard A. Watson is here to lead us onto the right path! And somehow it involves some of the most destructive advice about fitness and weight loss I've ever heard: slash your daily calories to starvation levels and simultaneously run, don't walk, long blistering miles a day--whether it drives you nuts or not, whether it causes injuries or not, whether you're feeling the medical ill-effects of starvation or not. And somehow this is supposed to make us better people who care more about the state of the universe? Right.

I thought this sort of hogwash was debunked in the '70s. Apparently there are some holdout nut cases who are unapologetic about causing their followers to go through yo-yo weight fluctuation, overall weight gain, serious running injuries, exquisite physical misery, an overall sense of crushing failure, and sometimes even clinical depression.

Numerous medical studies have confirmed: Avoid this approach. It is bad for you.

--Fiona