Book Reviews of Politically Incorrect : The Emerging Faith Factor in American Politics

Politically Incorrect : The Emerging Faith Factor in American Politics
Politically Incorrect The Emerging Faith Factor in American Politics
Author: Ralph E. Reed
ISBN-13: 9780849911729
ISBN-10: 0849911729
Publication Date: 9/1994
Pages: 312
Edition: Special
Rating:
  • Currently 3.1/5 Stars.
 4

3.1 stars, based on 4 ratings
Publisher: W Pub Group
Book Type: Hardcover
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reviewed Politically Incorrect : The Emerging Faith Factor in American Politics on + 18 more book reviews
Interesting read. A thoughtful assessment of politics & faith.
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From Library Journal

Reed, the executive director of the Christian Coalition, issues Christians a call to arms in the ongoing "culture wars." In a fair and judicious manner, he articulates how religious people who hold pro-family views have been alienated from the political process. Reed argues that the conventional conservative religious view of a society composed of stronger families, smaller government, less crime, and more educational support is well supported outside as well as inside the Church. Christians can implement this vision through prayer, participation in the political process, and persistence. Though Reed's solutions to social ills are often simplistic, he has written a sober and clear plan of action for conservative religious people seeking to change society. Recommended for public libraries.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

In this book-length exposition of the Christian Coalition's aims (a drastically shorter one is in Disciples and Democracy ), its executive director articulates the organization's agenda, explains how religion has been--much to the detriment of social cohesion--shunted aside by twentieth-century politics and exhorts people of faith to participate at all levels of politics, indeed, perhaps especially at the local level (on school boards, neighborhood councils, etc.), and to communicate their opinions to those in higher elective offices. Throughout, Reed gives little history refreshers on the influence, bad (white Christian resistance to black civil rights) as well as good, Christianity has exerted on U.S. political and social development. Although he leaves a few controversial coalition stands unexplained (especially its opposition to gay rights), Reed presents the program of the so-called Religious Right cogently and winningly; anyone who wants to know what that program is all about could not do better than to read this book. With a 125,000-copy first printing and an extensive media campaign and national author tour already launched, its fame will precede its presence in most libraries. Ray Olson