Book Reviews of The Prometheus Deception

The Prometheus Deception
The Prometheus Deception
Author: Robert Ludlum
ISBN-13: 9780312978365
ISBN-10: 0312978367
Publication Date: 10/14/2001
Pages: 576
Rating:
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 101

3.7 stars, based on 101 ratings
Publisher: St. Martin's Paperbacks
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

28 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Prometheus Deception on + 47 more book reviews
Ludlum is always good... another great plot that keeps you on the edge.
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"A page-turner of nonstop action that should leave his fans begging for more." - New York Post.

"Explosive" - San Francisco Chronicle
reviewed The Prometheus Deception on
Not his best work. Portions were exciting, then go 20 pages or so with slow, if any action.
reviewed The Prometheus Deception on + 23 more book reviews
Great story!!! One of Ludlum's best!
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not as good as his earlier stuff; published post mortem
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Fast paced thriller.
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The ultimate spy. After 15 years as a brilliant master spy, Nick Bryson has disappeared into anonymity as a professor at an exclusive college in western Pennsylvania-until he's suddenly lured back into the game.
The ultimate threat. Recruited by the CIA, he's b een commissioned to track the moves of the Directorate. Once, the ultra-secret intelligence agency was Bryson's training ground. Now it's a multinational terrorist conspiracy bent on global domination.
The ultimate deception. But to eliminate the core of corruption means plunging into his own past, investigating the motives of a beautiful stranger who may be his greatest downfall, and infiltrating a secret nexus of power called Prometheus that holds the terrifying clues to his past-and the even more terrifying possibilities of the future...
reviewed The Prometheus Deception on + 28 more book reviews
After fifteen years as a brilliant master spy, Nick Bryson has disappeared into anonymity as a professor at an exclusive college in western Pennsylvaniauntil hes suddenly lured back into the game. Recruited by the CIA, hes been commissioned to track the moves of the Directorate. Once, the ultra-secret intelligence agency was Brysons training ground. Now its a multinational terrorist conspiracy bent on global domination. But to eliminate the core of corruption means plunging into his own past, investigating the motives of a beautiful stranger who may be his greatest downfall, and infiltrating a secret nexus of power called Prometheus that holds the terrifying clues to his pastand the even more terrifying possibilities of the future
reviewed The Prometheus Deception on + 6 more book reviews
Fast paced, fun read. Clever plot twists made it hard to put down.
reviewed The Prometheus Deception on + 26 more book reviews
This is a very complicated story. Lots of action. A real page-turner!
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A very good book. Typical of Ludlum
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An interesting book with lots of twists and turns. Who's the enemy, who's the friend -- it's hard to tell, but all is revealed in the end. Lots of action and intrigue.
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Typical Ludlum. Good escapist reading.
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"This is a rousing thriller with all the trademarks of a Ludlum bestseller.... heart pounding....fast paced.... explosive." -- LIBRARY JOURNAL
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A political spy thriller involving the nations super secret intelligence agency called The Directorate. The Directorate is either involved in a plot or being set up as a target. Nick Bryson retired master spy is recruited to determine the source of the multinational terrorist organization set upon world domination.
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Ludlum writes the best CIA thriller books I've ever read!
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LUDLUM`S BEST-READ SEVERAL TIMES.
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The ultimate spy. After fifteen years as a brilliant master spy, Nick Bryson has disappeared into anonymity as a professor at an exclusive college in western Pennsylvania - until he's suddenly lured back into the game.
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Suspence and spies in a thrilling story that was surprisingly good from a very prolific writer.
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A really good book! Thrilling and kept my interest throughout.
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Ludlum's latest is a spy thriller that should keep even the most experienced readers guessing. Nick Bryson works for an ultrasecret intelligence organization; after making a mistake during a mission, he's put out to pasture. Later, he's brought back into the game by a different intelligence group, and he learns that everything he believed about his former bosses was a lie -- until, that is, he discovers that everything the second organization has told him is also a lie. Bryson winds up trying single-handedly to save the world from a shadowy terrorist group, while simultaneously trying to figure out which of the various "good guys" he should believe.

Ludlum relies heavily on action scenes to tell this extremely convoluted story: there's plenty of gunplay here, lots of exciting scenes featuring Nick captured, or nearly captured, or running from various bad guys. On the other hand, the scenes in which characters explain the inner workings of international espionage to each other often seem sluggish, full of backstory these professional spies should already know. Readers who have had trouble looking beyond Ludlum's typically thin characters and clunky dialogue will still have problems here, but they will find some compensation: the pace is fast, the action plentiful, and the story confusing enough to keep us turning the pages. For Ludlum's fans, of course, this one's a must-read.
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Some review snippits from the book:

"Readers will remain in the dark right up until the explosive climax."
-- The San Francisco Chronicle

"Reading a Ludlam novel is like watching a James Bond film...slickly paced....all-consuming."
--Entertainment Weekly

"Ludman's latest is a spy thriller that should keep even the most experienced reader guessing....The pace is fast, the action plentiful...a must read."
--Booklist

"Ludlam delivers again another top-notch, international thriller sure to please...heart-pounding chase scenes, devastating double-crosses, gut-wrenching twists, fast-paced action, fierce confrontations, pressure that ratchets up to an explosive conclusion, and, always, authentic international locales, high-tech gadgetry, and sophisticated spycraft."
--Library Journal
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fantastic read!
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I normally love Ludlum books and this was no exception. Fast paced plot giving you a very fast terrorist/tourist spin around the world.
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This is an abridged version on 6 CD's, approx. 6 hours.
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Amazon.com Review

The Prometheus Deception begins with a deep-cover operative, a beautiful cryptographer with a shadowy past, a government organization that's not what it seems, and an assignment that goes very, very wrong. Nicholas Bryson, a spy for a secret intelligence group known only as the Directorate, has his cover blown on a Tunisian operation and is retired to a new identity: Jonas Barrett, lecturer in Near Eastern history at a small liberal arts college. Five years later, the CIA corners Bryson/Barrett and tells him that his entire 15-year career in the Directorate was a fraud, that the organization was really an elaborate front for the GRU--Soviet military intelligence--and that his former boss, Ted Waller, was actually Gennady Rosovsky, a GRU muckety-muck. Even Bryson's beloved estranged wife, Elena, was actually a Romanian Securitate agent assigned to keep him in line. And now...

"Damn it!" Bryson shouted. "This makes no sense! How ignorant do you think I am? The goddamn GRU, the Russians--that's all in the past. Maybe you Cold War cowboys at Langley haven't yet heard the news--the war's over!"

"Yes," Dunne replied raspily, barely audible. "And for some baffling reason the Directorate is alive and well."

So far so good; after 22 thrillers in this vein, Robert Ludlum could probably have written this one in his sleep. Fortunately for his fans, he was not only awake at the wheel, but ready to race--on a track with more twists and bumps than a roller coaster in an earthquake. The CIA claims it needs Bryson to reinfiltrate the Directorate and help them bring it down, but when Bryson is cornered by an erstwhile Directorate acquaintance aboard a floating arms bazaar and rescued by a woman named Layla just before the ship blows up, he begins to realize how the years of retirement have dulled his formerly keen reaction time. While Bryson cautiously feels (and fights) his way from Virginia to Spain and back again, mistrustful of his new CIA colleagues even as he dodges murder attempts by his former Directorate henchmen, there are rumblings in the hallowed halls of the U.S. Congress. Several respected statesmen are raising a ruckus about widespread invasions of privacy, behind which stand a Seattle software billionaire and a mysterious nexus of power called Prometheus. But is Prometheus allied with the Directorate--or with a different group altogether? Filled with post-Cold War double-crosses, New Economy high jinks, and even a few Wall Street shenanigans thrown in for good measure, The Prometheus Deception is pure old-style Ludlum, repackaged for the new millennium. --Barrie Trinkle --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Ludlum goes full throttle in this frantically paced, if somewhat hollow, tale of one man's efforts to thwart the forces of world domination. That man is Nick Bryson, a retired operative for the Directorate, the most secretive of the world's many private intelligence agencies. Now working in the peaceful halls of academe, Bryson is stunned when the CIA informs him that the Directorate, to which he pledged his loyalty for nearly 20 years, was actually a Russian front. Worse yet, the organization seems to be stockpiling weapons for a secret assault on the West. When Bryson agrees to help the CIA bring down the Directorate, he's hurled into a series of hair-raising episodes that take him from one world capital to another. With assassins snapping at his heels, Bryson watches in horror as tragedy follows him wherever he goesAan anthrax outbreak in Vienna, a passenger train blown up outside Paris, a jetliner falling from the sky over New York City. Could these terrorist attacks be the work of the Directorate, Bryson wonders, or should they be attributed to the Prometheans, another shadowy intelligence outfit that seems to be the force behind a new international surveillance agency? Catapulting from one action sequence to the next and culminating in a spectacular finale in Seattle, the story is an exciting showcase for all the latest spy gadgetry, but it has little of the contemplative quality and social context of Ludlum's finer efforts. Ludlum's cautionary themeAthat technology will soon allow for surveillance on a scale that grossly infringes on personal privacyAgets lost in the barrage of flying bullets and explosions. Bryson himself is a dynamo and lots of fun to watch in action, but his almost superhuman endurance and intelligence seem more suited to that other heroic gentleman of adventure, Clive Cussler's Dirk Pitt, than to a Ludlum hero. Major ad/promo. (Oct.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Born suspense storyt teller-for smart people!
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Mines is a hardback.

Editorial Reviews

The Prometheus Deception begins with a deep-cover operative, a beautiful cryptographer with a shadowy past, a government organization that's not what it seems, and an assignment that goes very, very wrong. Nicholas Bryson, a spy for a secret intelligence group known only as the Directorate, has his cover blown on a Tunisian operation and is retired to a new identity: Jonas Barrett, lecturer in Near Eastern history at a small liberal arts college. Five years later, the CIA corners Bryson/Barrett and tells him that his entire 15-year career in the Directorate was a fraud, that the organization was really an elaborate front for the GRU--Soviet military intelligence--and that his former boss, Ted Waller, was actually Gennady Rosovsky, a GRU muckety-muck. Even Bryson's beloved estranged wife, Elena, was actually a Romanian Securitate agent assigned to keep him in line.