Discussion Forums - Questions about PaperBackSwap Questions about PaperBackSwap

Topic: Protecting covers

Club rule - Please, if you cannot be courteous and respectful, do not post in this forum.
  Unlock Forum posting with Annual Membership.
Subject: Protecting covers
Date Posted: 12/3/2008 2:07 PM ET
Member Since: 10/10/2008
Posts: 63
Back To Top

Since joining PBS, I've wondered if it might be a good thing to use clear laminating plastic on the paperback covers?

 

Sianeka - ,
Date Posted: 12/3/2008 2:13 PM ET
Member Since: 2/8/2007
Posts: 6,630
Back To Top

I wouldn't, unless you are keeping the book.  I personally would love to have laminated book covers, but some people here have addressed this issue in the forums and they don't like it.

To be on the safe side, I wouldn't.  Or I'd PM the person first...

Date Posted: 12/3/2008 2:37 PM ET
Member Since: 10/13/2007
Posts: 36,445
Back To Top

I wouldnt do it unless you are wanting to keep them, BUT if you do please buy the stuff that is acid free, that way your book should last longer.

If you want the good stuff then buy Kapco, its a hard plastic adhesive that libraries use to lenghten the life of MMPB and some magazines. It is designed for the job and comes in various grades. I have used this stuff and find it not that hard to use.

Date Posted: 12/3/2008 3:14 PM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2005
Posts: 7,977
Back To Top


Last Edited on: 5/20/10 3:03 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 12/3/2008 3:35 PM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2007
Posts: 4,058
Back To Top

It differs from person to person, so I wouldn't do it either - unless they're keepers, and then, probably only if it was something old and out of print and I was trying to preserve it.  Low acid vinyls cause the least amount of yellowing to the paper they come in contact with, but they don't adhere as well & are far from a perfect long term protection solution.  I think anything that permanently sticks to a cover causes some sort of  problem in the long term.   You can get the Brodart clear vinyl slipcovers in sizes that fit MMPBs now, and I think these are a good long term protection option, but they aren't quite as inexpensive as laminates.  I think there are sellers on ebay & Amazon who always have them in stock.  I never order direct from Brodart - shipping costs a fortune - but here's a link to them in their online catalogue so you can see what they are & how they work: www.shopbrodart.com/shop/cb/product.aspx

Date Posted: 12/3/2008 3:54 PM ET
Member Since: 10/13/2007
Posts: 36,445
Back To Top

Cindy- kapco is not meant to be removed its meant to be a permanent cover on the book.  As for the price, yup its expensive but some of the books I covered were worth alot more and cannot be replaced.  For everyday paperbacks its not worth the effort, collectors editions yup its worth it.

Date Posted: 12/3/2008 5:08 PM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2005
Posts: 7,977
Back To Top


Last Edited on: 5/20/10 3:03 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 12/3/2008 5:52 PM ET
Member Since: 7/7/2007
Posts: 4,815
Back To Top

Janet--

If you're just looking to protect the book while you read it, you might consider a reusable book cover.  There are several kinds for sale in the PBS Kiosk, plus you can get them at bookstores and elsewhere.

Cheers,

Catt

Date Posted: 12/4/2008 8:31 PM ET
Member Since: 9/13/2008
Posts: 2
Back To Top

I'm surprised to find the answer to this question so quickly! I just found a box of young adult novels I forgot I had, but most of them were laminated to reduce the wear and tear of heavy use in a high school classroom. I wasn't sure if they were postable or not. I wish there was a way to specify so I could put them out there for somebody who wouldn't care.

Date Posted: 12/4/2008 9:07 PM ET
Member Since: 8/31/2008
Posts: 2,608
Back To Top

I think laminating paperback covers would be a good idea, but I agree that others might not want that, so I haven't tried it.  Paperbacks tend to be $15.00 these days, and the covers are very flimsy - not much thicker than the pages themselves.  I am reading a paperback that I bought on sale, but the full retail price is $15.  I bought it new, but it already looks like lots of people have read it.  They don't make them like they used to...

Date Posted: 12/5/2008 12:20 AM ET
Member Since: 7/6/2008
Posts: 84
Back To Top

I think you can post them, they are after all, ex library books. And those allowed here. You could pm a requestor just to make sure they don't mind the laminate.

I frankly love the laminated covers because that way my books last longer.  I wouldn't go & stick it on yourself. You might want to go through & make sure no one drew on the pages, all my high school books got decorated...

Date Posted: 12/5/2008 12:38 PM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2007
Posts: 4,058
Back To Top

There's no rule against laminated covers, Susan.  I've gotten several here myself, all in excellent condition.  I occasionally find them at library sales as well.  Whether you should do it or not really just depends on what it is and why you want to preserve it.   If it's something that you want to keep long term, for whatever reason, then it's a viable option, as long as you're aware that it's permanent.  At least part of the issue some people have with laminating paperback covers has to do with collectibility.  I imagine some of us would have trouble with the concept of collectible paperback books, but like vintage comic books & magazines there are some - well, actually many - very old, out of print paperback books that are considered collectibles and not just "used books".  The closer a rare, out of print book is to "new" condition, the more collectible it generally is, but that doesn't mean that all old books are collectible - even if they're rare.  I'm sure somebody thought the idea of laminating their old books to preserve them (which is fine for collectors who just want to keep & re-read them) would be a good thing, but most collectors don't laminate comic book & magazine covers to preserve them, they buy special protective sleeves & containers to keep them in, and collectible paperbacks really need some type of material friendly preservation to remain nice as well.  Like any other collectible, when you permanently alter it in some way, it affects the collectibility of the item.  The slipcovers I posted a link to earlier for keeping covers in pristine condition are great, but like a laminate, they won't do anything to preserve the pages, which can become tanned or develop those rusty looking spots known as "foxing".  Certain laminates will become brittle/peel over time, and can damage the cover.  I personally have never seen a book that had been covered with a laminate for a long period of time that wasn't permanently altered because of it.   I used rolled & taped bread bags at one time to store my old collectibles in, but then I found out that most old paperbacks have a high acid content in the paper, inks, etc, and some vintage book/magazine preservation experts maintain that long term airtight storage can be just as damaging as no protection at all.  If you do prefer some sort of sleeve or bag, the last time I checked, I think Mylar is the most often recommended material for protection against yellowing and acid build-up.  Some people tend to associate it with the shiny balloons, but basic Mylar is actually a clear poly material and is only shiny whenlaminated to aluminum foil.  Old books apparently need a certain level of air circulation, and storage sleeves usually aren't airtight - they usually just have a flap at the top that can be taped down.  I do like to actually read my books (which is why I don't have any problems with laminated copies:P) and Mylar sleeves are expensive, so I went with plastic storage drawer units, and now keep everything I have in those.  They allow for air circulation and protect the books from dust & shelf wear.  I also recently started saving those little silica gel packs and capsules that come in all sorts of products these days, and taping one or two of them to the back of the drawer where it doesn't make contact with my books.  I have no idea if this really does any good or not & I suppose only time will tell.  Silica is a desiccant; it removes moisture/water vapor from the air around the items you store it with, and mositure will cause significant damage to all types of stored paper products.  Many vintage magazine collectors use similar storage methods to preserve their magazines. 

Anyhoo, all of this is just book conservation & preservation trivia and may be of absolutely no interest to most readers.  Some people actually do collect books just to read them after all:P  I just thought it might help clarify the question of what exactly is "wrong" with laminates, and why some people object to them or being sent books with laminated covers.  If I were guessing, I would say that this most often applies to collectors & resellers.  Most readers probably won't mind laminates at all - may not even know why they should - but there probably are people out there who just value an old favorite and want to keep it in good condition for future reading.  I don't think PBS is a good source to obtain collectibles for any purpose other than just reading.  The posting guidelines are structured for readers rather than collectors, who can sometimes be very picky about certain things that PBS allows. Hope this helps:)