Book Reviews of Purple Hibiscus

Purple Hibiscus
Purple Hibiscus
Author: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
ISBN-13: 9780965503761
ISBN-10: 0965503763
Publication Date: 2003
Pages: 307
Rating:
  • Currently 3.6/5 Stars.
 10

3.6 stars, based on 10 ratings
Publisher: Anchor Books
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

5 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Purple Hibiscus on + 13 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A sad story about how religion/missionary work can cause more damage than good. A young Nigerian girl, Kambli, struggles with her place in life and her Catholic converted father, who is more interested in the strict rules of the religion that what is truly important in life, like family and tradition.
reviewed Purple Hibiscus on
Good novel reflecting sorrows of life in Nigeria and affect on children.
reviewed Purple Hibiscus on + 143 more book reviews
I give this book a high rating. It was extremely well written. It's about an African girl coming of age. There is abuse but it was not graphic and you could get past it.
reviewed Purple Hibiscus on + 37 more book reviews
"Purple Hibiscus" tells the story of Kambili and her family. Their family is a joyless one. Kambili's father is abusive, physically, verbally, and mentally. However, this fact is not known and her father is highly respected throughout the community. After beating Kambili so badly that she ends up in the hospital for months, their lives all take a dramatic and drastic change.

I have to confess, I listened to Purple Hibiscus on CD. (It was unabridged.) And I think I would have liked it better had I read it myself. It was nice, however, to know how the names and Nigerian words are pronounced, but other than that, I didn't really care for the audio version.

As far as the book itself, it is well written. It's not entertaining, but it's not really supposed to be. Unfortunately, I don't really think I can recommend that you read it. I didn't feel enlightened, encouraged, or motivated towards some change. I guess "Purple Hibiscus" did reinforce the fact that you can't judge what's happening at home by how someone appears to the outside world.
reviewed Purple Hibiscus on
Compelling work!