Book Reviews of RHINEGOLD

RHINEGOLD
RHINEGOLD
Author: Stephen Grundy
ISBN-13: 9780553095456
ISBN-10: 0553095455
Publication Date: 3/1/1994
Pages: 721
Rating:
  • Currently 2.5/5 Stars.
 1

2.5 stars, based on 1 rating
Publisher: Bantam
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

4 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed RHINEGOLD on + 12 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A retelling of the Ring Cycle, without the anti-Semitic operatic bits. Huge paperback that will last you a while.
reviewed RHINEGOLD on + 114 more book reviews
First, I need to be fair and state that I'm not a fan of Germanic/Norse mythology. Rhinegold hasn't changed that. I was hoping to find a compelling story that brought these myths to life, but that's not what I found here. There is nothing intrinsically wrong with Grundy's prose, the book was a fine read. It's just that the characters weren't brought to life, their motivations remained hazy and the justifications for their actions not real to me.

The Norse gods are cruel and capricious, creating heroes only to destroy them for no good reason - why'd they even bother creating a line of heroes then? The characters I enjoyed most were the evil/misunderstood Hagan, and the brief life of the unpronounceable minor hero Sinfjotli. Hero Sigifrith is also given a short shrift and not much book time considering he's the "greatest hero of all time". At least these characters were given some background, and a brief look at what they were thinking and feeling. The women fare little better: Brunichild's vengeance makes little sense, she seems like a spoiled brat - "If I can't have him, no one can" rather than acting like a strong and independent woman betrayed, which is what she is. Gundrun's vengeance on her husband is a bit more believable, although the "sorcery" used on her to direct her actions(and on Sigifrith's) is more of the hazy/make of it what you will storytelling.

I understand that Grundy was staying true to the ancient mythology so his story couldn't stray much from the plotline, but this book wasn't one to bring these stories to life for me. Give me Greek mythology over Nordic stories any day...
reviewed RHINEGOLD on + 26 more book reviews
Set against a landscape of howling snows and golden summertide loves, of trollcraft and blood-oaths, of proud ships and roistering mead-halls, enchanted sunrises and dazzling valkyries, Rhinegold breathes life into an age of unequaled grandeur. Based on the same Norse myths that inspired Wagner's magnificant Ring Cycle, this is the story of two warrior lines whose destines are interwoven throughout seven generations by the might god Wodan. From the bravery in battle of Sigifrith to the unrivaled beauty and courage of Brunichild, these two clans will be bound by a hoard of gold that will become the spark of bloodshed and the destroyer of dynasties.
reviewed RHINEGOLD on + 114 more book reviews
First, I need to be fair and state that I'm not a fan of Germanic/Norse mythology. Rhinegold hasn't changed that. I was hoping to find a compelling story that brought these myths to life, but that's not what I found here. There is nothing intrinsically wrong with Grundy's prose, the book was a fine read. It's just that the characters weren't brought to life, their motivations remained hazy and the justifications for their actions not real to me.

The Norse gods are cruel and capricious, creating heroes only to destroy them for no good reason - why'd they even bother creating a line of heroes then? The characters I enjoyed most were the evil/misunderstood Hagan, and the brief life of the unpronounceable minor hero Sinfjotli. Hero Sigifrith is also given a short shrift and not much book time considering he's the "greatest hero of all time". At least these characters were given some background, and a brief look at what they were thinking and feeling. The women fare little better: Brunichild's vengeance makes little sense, she seems like a spoiled brat - "If I can't have him, no one can" rather than acting like a strong and independent woman betrayed, which is what she is. Gundrun's vengeance on her husband is a bit more believable, although the "sorcery" used on her to direct her actions(and on Sigifrith's) is more of the hazy/make of it what you will storytelling.

I understand that Grundy was staying true to the ancient mythology so his story couldn't stray much from the plotline, but this book wasn't one to bring these stories to life for me. Give me Greek mythology over Nordic stories any day...