Book Reviews of Raptor Red

Raptor Red
Raptor Red
Author: Robert T. Bakker
ISBN-13: 9780553542523
ISBN-10: 0553542524
Publication Date: 6/1/1996
Pages: 256
Rating:
  • Currently 3.3/5 Stars.
 8

3.3 stars, based on 8 ratings
Publisher: Bantam Books
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

16 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Raptor Red on + 6 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
Raptor Red is truly an imaginative story told from the point of view of a female raptor and her love for her sibling and the 'chicks'. Of particular interest to me was a passage about how she and her pack deal with a nasty parasite and how she resolves the issue. I know, sounds gross, but really, it's quite intuitive. Red has romance, sorrow, and family strife, all the good things that make up a satisfying story. I'd love to see Mr. Bakker write more prehistoric stories from the animals' point-of-view. Excellent, quick read. Suitable for age 13 on up. Not for small children.
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Helpful Score: 3
I read about half of this book because I had nothing else with me at the time. Granted, it's filled with a lot of info, but the story just didn't hook me at all. I've found it more interesting to read an actual science book on the subject or watch the documentaries done in story format on Discovery channel. However, I'm sure there are some who would find this very interesting, but it was just not my style of story.
reviewed Raptor Red on + 38 more book reviews
This was one of my favourite books as a kid! I remember being shocked that a book could be written from the perspective of something so obviously not-human. Not inhuman, but not-human. The imagery was a colourful reproduction of the time of the dinosaurs.
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from back of book:
So begins one of the most extraordinary novels you will ever read. The time is 120 million years ago, the place is the plains of prehistoric Utah, and the eyes belong to an unforgettable heroine. Her name is Raptor Red, and she is a female raptor dinosaur.
Painting a rich and colorful picture of a lush prehistoric world, leading paleontologist Robert T. Bakker tells his story from within Raptor Red's extraordinary mind, dramatizing his revolutiionary theories in this exciting tale. From a tragic loss to the fierce struggle for survival to a daring migration to the Pacific Ocean to escape a deadly new predator, Raptor Red combines fact and fiction to capture for the first time the thoughts, emotions, and behaviors of the most magnificent, enigmatic creatures ever to walk the face of the earth.
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The story of a raptor's life. I enjoyed this during a vacation, but had my 11 year old daughter steal it from me and read it in a day before I could finish it. I would think kids who are interested in dinosaurs would love this book. Probably takes at least 5th grade reading level.
reviewed Raptor Red on + 48 more book reviews
From the back cover: Painting a rich and colorful picture of a lush prehistoric world, leading paleontologist Robert T. Bakker tells his story from within Raptor Red's extraordinary mind.
reviewed Raptor Red on + 1756 more book reviews
I read about half of this book because I had nothing else with me at the time. Granted, it's filled with a lot of info, but the story just didn't hook me at all. I've found it more interesting to read an actual science book on the subject or watch the documentaries done in story format on Discovery channel. However, I'm sure there are some who would find this very interesting, but it was just not my style of story.
reviewed Raptor Red on + 1520 more book reviews
Paleontologist Robert Bakker's book might be considered all the back story for the movie JURASSIC PARK, but it's a whole lot more than that. Interesting, informative, and a darned good tale, too. He even threw in love interest and 'other women.' Fun!

From back cover: A pair of fierce but beautiful eyes look out from the undergrowth of conifers. She is an intelligent killer... So begins one of the most extraordinary novels you will ever read. The time is 120 million years ago, the place is the plains of prehistoric Utah, and the eyes belong to an unforgettable heroine. Her name is Raptor Red, and she is a female Raptor dinosaur.
Painting a rich and colorful picture of a lush prehistoric world, leading paleontologist Robert T. Bakker tells his story from within Raptor Red's extraordinary mind, dramatizing his revolutionary theories in this exciting tale. From a tragic loss to the fierce struggle for survival to a daring migration to the Pacific Ocean to escape a deadly new predator, Raptor Red combines fact an fiction to capture for the first time the thoughts, emotions, and behaviors of the most magnificent, enigmatic creatures ever to walk the face of the earth.
reviewed Raptor Red on + 6 more book reviews
Interesting perspective, though some of the storytelling seemed a bit forced considering the scientific approach.
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A very entertaining book with the story told from the raptor's point of view.
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A fantastic book depicting a female raptor and her life. Bakker has done an excellent job of describing these dinosaurs and life habits. A must have for any dinosaur enthusiast!
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From Publishers Weekly
Narrated from the point of view of a dinosaur, paleontologist Bakker's novel is filled with facts and informed speculations regarding dinosaur life. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
The dinosaur known as "raptor" first became well known through Michael Crichton's Jurassic Park (Knopf, 1990). Revolutionary paleontologist Bakker (The Dinosaur Heresies, LJ 11/1/86), who consulted on the special effects for the film adaptation, has written a novel that might be subtitled "A Year in the Life of a Dinosaur," as he tells the story of Raptor Red, a giant carnivore of the Early Cretaceous period. Having lost her mate in a botched hunting attack, Red (so-named because of the red stripe on her snout distinguishing her from other raptor species) joins forces with her sister and her sister's three chicks to survive in a world of hostile natural forces. Bakker manages to mix scientific theories?some of which are definitely on the cutting edge?with a rip-roaring narrative. Perhaps even more miraculously, he has created a sympathetic nonhuman heroine without anthropomorphizing her into a Disney character. This astonishing and successful novel will appeal to a wide audience and belongs in all fiction collections. -Eric W. Johnson, Teikyo Post Univ. Lib., Waterbury, Conn. Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
2 cassettes.
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i have listened to this book several times and it is always as good as the first time.
reviewed Raptor Red on + 1756 more book reviews
I read about half of this book because I had nothing else with me at the time. Granted, it's filled with a lot of info, but the story just didn't hook me at all. I've found it more interesting to read an actual science book on the subject or watch the documentaries done in story format on Discovery channel. However, I'm sure there are some who would find this very interesting, but it was just not my style of story.
reviewed Raptor Red on + 1756 more book reviews
I read about half of this book because I had nothing else with me at the time. Granted, it's filled with a lot of info, but the story just didn't hook me at all. I've found it more interesting to read an actual science book on the subject or watch the documentaries done in story format on Discovery channel. However, I'm sure there are some who would find this very interesting, but it was just not my style of story.
reviewed Raptor Red on + 1756 more book reviews
I read about half of this book because I had nothing else with me at the time. Granted, it's filled with a lot of info, but the story just didn't hook me at all. I've found it more interesting to read an actual science book on the subject or watch the documentaries done in story format on Discovery channel. However, I'm sure there are some who would find this very interesting, but it was just not my style of story.