Book Reviews of The Rebels of Ireland (Dublin Saga, Bk 2)

The Rebels of Ireland (Dublin Saga, Bk 2)
The Rebels of Ireland - Dublin Saga, Bk 2
Author: Edward Rutherfurd
ISBN-13: 9780385512893
ISBN-10: 0385512899
Publication Date: 2/28/2006
Pages: 896
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 10

3.8 stars, based on 10 ratings
Publisher: Doubleday
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

6 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Rebels of Ireland (Dublin Saga, Bk 2) on + 118 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Very well-written, an expansive novel that is the sequel to The Princes of Ireland, this title details the modern Irish struggle for independence from Britain. A great read as a history book, good vignette chapters which weaves the centuries together through descendants of the same families--highly recommend it.
reviewed The Rebels of Ireland (Dublin Saga, Bk 2) on + 20 more book reviews
A wonderful epic saga which details the lives of memorable characters through the lens of Irish history
reviewed The Rebels of Ireland (Dublin Saga, Bk 2) on + 32 more book reviews
Edward Rutherfurd is a wonderful storyteller, but I just couldn't get into this book.
reviewed The Rebels of Ireland (Dublin Saga, Bk 2) on
This is the 2nd book in Rutherfurds' story about Ireland. I love this author, but this particular story was not as interesting as his other books. Book 2 was not as interesting as book 1. If you're Irish, you will probably love the cast of characters!
reviewed The Rebels of Ireland (Dublin Saga, Bk 2) on + 120 more book reviews
A great sequel to the author's book THE PRINCES OF IRELAND.
reviewed The Rebels of Ireland (Dublin Saga, Bk 2) on + 6 more book reviews
I generally like Rutherfurd's work and Rebels of Ireland was no exception. I preferred the Princes of Ireland, however. Largely because I was very disappointed in the ending of Rebels, and that's why I've given it only 3 stars instead of a solid 4. Without giving anything away, I felt that the ending was too abrupt. Furthermore, much of Irish history in the 20th century is significant, and by stopping Rebels in the 1920s, Rutherfurd missed out on a lot of "good stuff." It almost seems like he just got tired of writing, which after close to 2000 pages between both books, I can understand...but still. I wanted to know more about Ireland, especially since my goal of reading it was to learn more in preparation for my upcoming trip to Ireland. Still, it's worth a read, if you're interested in the subject, and I have to say, I did learn a lot.