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Topic: Recommendation for Da Vinci Code fan?

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Subject: Recommendation for Da Vinci Code fan?
Date Posted: 1/16/2009 7:40 PM ET
Member Since: 1/7/2009
Posts: 3
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I was wondering if anyone could recommend other books I might like, similar to Dan Brown's Da Vinci Code or Angels and Demons? I did read his other books, but they weren't really my cup of tea. Does not necessarily have to be a religious theme, but that would be fine by me as that is interesting to me. Thanks so much! :-)

Sara

Kat (polbio) -
Date Posted: 1/17/2009 9:14 AM ET
Member Since: 10/10/2008
Posts: 3,067
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Steve Berry has some books with similar themes. Some of his books are The Romanov Prophecy (really good), The Third Secret, Teh Templar Legacy, The Alexandria Link (which is my next read).There are a few others as well.

Kim (Mistry) -
Date Posted: 1/17/2009 1:40 PM ET
Member Since: 6/23/2006
Posts: 4,119
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I like James Rollins, he does thriller/treasure hunter/riddles within riddles types of books, some have religious undertones, some not.  Sandstorm was very good, among others.   I like Steve Berry, also.

Date Posted: 1/17/2009 2:11 PM ET
Member Since: 7/14/2007
Posts: 8,942
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Definitely Steve Berry and James Rollins, although you may want to start at the beginning and read forward on the Berry books since there are recurring characters.  The Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child books are also very good, as are Brad Meltzer's.   I found Meltzer's Book of Fate very interesting.

Kat (polbio) -
Date Posted: 1/17/2009 2:26 PM ET
Member Since: 10/10/2008
Posts: 3,067
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Sharon,

I have only read the one book by Berry, but I really liked it. Enough that i ordered more of them. I didnt realize they had any order, so I looked it up. His first four books are not part of a series, but his latest four are (the Cotton Malone series). These books are The Templar Legacy, the Alexandria Link, The Venetian Betrayal and The Charlemagne Pursuit.

Date Posted: 1/18/2009 11:58 AM ET
Member Since: 7/14/2007
Posts: 8,942
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That's it - the Cotton Malone books should, I think, be read in order.  The character relationships tend to evolve and re-evolve in those.

Date Posted: 1/18/2009 4:40 PM ET
Member Since: 8/22/2008
Posts: 177
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Try some of James Patterson books. He writes great mystery's and the few that I read of his reminded me of Dan Brown's kind of writing.

Date Posted: 1/24/2009 2:30 AM ET
Member Since: 12/20/2008
Posts: 1,417
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If you liked Da Vinci Code, and Angels and Demons, I think you will love Katherine Neville's "The Eight."

Although "The Eight" isn't so much about dead artists and the Catholic Church, it is a very smart mystery/thriller.

Amazon.com Review
Katherine Neville's debut novel is a postmodern thriller set in 1972 ... and 1790. In the 20th century, Catherine Velis is a computer expert with a flair for music, painting, and chess who, on her way to Algeria at the behest of the accounting firm where she is employed, is invited to take a mysterious moonlighting assignment: recover the pieces of an old chess set missing for centuries.

In the midst of the French Revolution, a young novice discovers that her abbey is the hiding place of a chess set, once owned by the great Charlemagne, which allows those who play it to tap into incredible powers beyond the imagination. She eventually comes into contact with the major historical figures of the day, from Robespierre to Napoleon, each of whom has an agenda.

The Eight is a non-stop ride that recalls the swashbuckling adventures of Indiana Jones as well as the historical puzzles of Umberto Eco which, since its first publication in 1988, has gone on to acquire a substantial cult following.

From Publishers Weekly
Even readers with no interest in chess will be swept up into this astonishing fantasy-adventure, a thoroughly accomplished first novel. Catherine Velis, a computer expert banished to Algeria by her accounting firm, gets caught up in a search for a legendary chess set once owned by Charlemagne. An antique dealer, a Soviet chess master, KGB agents and a fortune-teller who warns Catherine she's in big trouble all covet the fabled chess pieces, because the chess service, buried for 1000 years in a French abbey, supplies the key to a magic formula tied to numerology, alchemy, the Druids, Freemasonry, cosmic powers. As the story shuttles between the 1970s and the 1790s, we are introduced to 64 characters, including Mireille, a spunky French nun who helps scatter the individual chess pieces across Europe lest the set fall into evil hands. Involving Napoleon, Talleyrand, Casanova, Voltaire, Rousseau, Robespierre and Catherine the Great in the quest, Neville has great fun rewriting history and making it all ring true. With two believable heroines, nonstop suspense, espionage, murder and a puzzle that seems the key to the whole Western mystical tradition, this spellbinder soars above the level of first-rate escapist entertainment. Daring, original and moving, it seems destined to become a cult classic.

 

Date Posted: 1/24/2009 11:37 AM ET
Member Since: 7/14/2007
Posts: 8,942
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Ohh - you're right Melissa.  I love Katherine Neville! 

The Intelligencer by Leslie Silbert is of this ilk also.  The PB version even has a tag "Da Vinci Code style", so tags may be another way to search:

On May 30, 1593, London's most popular playwright was stabbed to death. The royal coroner ruled that Christopher Marlowe was killed in self-defense, but historians have long suspected otherwise, given his role as an "intelligencer" in the queen's secret service.

In sixteenth-century London, Marlowe embarks on his final intelligence assignment, hoping to find his missing muse, as well as the culprits behind a high-stakes smuggling scheme.

In present-day New York, grad student turned private eye Kate Morgan is called in on an urgent matter. One of her firm's top clients, a London-based financier, has chanced upon a mysterious manuscript that had been buried for centuries -- one that someone, somewhere is desperate to steal. What secret lurks in those yellowed, ciphered pages? And how, so many years later, could it drive someone to kill?

As Kate sets off for England, she receives a second assignment. An enigmatic art dealer has made an eleven-million-dollar purchase from an Iranian intelligence officer. Is it a black-market antiquities deal, or something far more sinister? Like Marlowe, Kate moonlights as a spy -- her P.I. firm doubles as an off-the-books U.S. intelligence unit -- and she is soon caught like a pawn in a deadly international game. As The Intelligencer's interlocking narratives race toward a stunning collision, and Kate closes in on the truth behind Marlowe's sudden death, it becomes clear that she may have sealed a similar fate for herself.

Propelling us from the shadows of the sixteenth-century underworld to the glitter of Queen Elizabeth's court, from the dark corridors of a clandestine American op-center to the cliffs of Capri, The Intelligencer is at once a murder mystery, a tale of poetic inspiration, and a richly detailed foray into parallel worlds of espionage and political intrigue separated by centuries.

Date Posted: 1/25/2009 1:59 PM ET
Member Since: 8/27/2007
Posts: 3,326
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Have you read any of Julie Kaewert's books?  I think they have similar story lines as DaV code with puzzles and secrets. They are best read in order, as most of the characters are recurring.  Unbound, Unprintable, Unsigned and three others.

 

Date Posted: 1/28/2009 11:24 AM ET
Member Since: 12/20/2008
Posts: 1,417
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Sharon--Thank you for the suggestion of The Intelligencer .

One other possibility is The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova.  I think it's on my bookshelf, along with a million other copies!

The Historian is about Vlad the Impaler, aka Dracula.  The book weaves between a few time periods, and the characters are well built.

One warning, it's a big book. BIG. But, after I think the 1st or 2nd chapter, you will be so relieved that you got through it... I hated having to put it down, even if for only a few minutes.