Book Reviews of Reversible Errors

Reversible Errors
Reversible Errors
Author: Scott Turow
ISBN-13: 9780374281601
ISBN-10: 0374281602
Publication Date: 10/1/2002
Pages: 448
Rating:
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 73

3.7 stars, based on 73 ratings
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

36 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

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Helpful Score: 2
While this story covers a death row immates appeal, it is also rich in character development of the players involved. A little predictible at times, but I enjoy Turow's books and this one did not disappoint.
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Helpful Score: 1
Very intelligent, grown up suspense with excellent characters.
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Helpful Score: 1
loved it!
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Helpful Score: 1
Good novel, gave me new perspective on death row inmates and their families.
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Helpful Score: 1
One of the best lawyer stories I've read. A definite must if you like Turow, Grisham, etc.,
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Large print, another good story from Scott Turow!
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A death row inmate has been assigned a new attorney who is dubious about his innocence. The inmate is able to convince the lawyer of his innocence with new evidence. Arthur Raven, the lawyer, now has to fight against legal corruption to get his client free.
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Death row inmate claims he is innocent, and new evidence convinces his court-appointed attorney. The battles are hard-fought, and the people involved work hard to keep the court ready to reverse their verdict. Winner of the Chicago Tribune fiction prize.
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Great suspenseful book. Interesting characters.
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Great read!
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Typical Turow. Good legal thriller.
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Scott Turow is one of the truly great writers of our time.
This way a real eye-opener!
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I really like Scott Turow books
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Scott Turow captures your attention and grabs you and doesn't let go until the end.
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Scott Turow always provides entertating reading. This on is no exception.
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Scott Turow's books are always well put together and fast paced with great characters & a wonderful, exciting plotline ... this one is no different.
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Turow's best yet.
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One of the best mystery/lawyer tales.
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My husband and I were listening to this while we traveled and we sort of lost interest in it, perhaps because we couldn't listen to it straight through. However, if you like Scott Turow you would probably like this book.
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One of my FAVORITES!
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Excellent death row suspense!
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I love Turow's books. I think he's the best legal thriller/courtroom drama author out there and this one is excellent.
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Scott Turow is one of the best with legal thrillers and this is a good one.
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Can't-put-it-down reading.
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Corporate lawyer Arthur Raven is the court-appointed attorney for a Death Row inmate. Convinced his client is innocent thanks to new evidence, Raven is a fervent crusader--and also a rookie in the vicious world of criminal law.
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Great lawyer storyteller!
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Great Turow novel. Great legal drama.
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Book is in wonderful shape it was discarded from my local library and i bought it.
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A super-charged, exquisitely suspenseful novel about a vicious triple murder and the man condemned to die for it

Rommy "Squirrel" Gandolph is a Yellow Man, an inmate on death row for a 1991 triple murder in Kindle County. His slow progress toward certain execution is nearing completion when Arthur Raven, a corporate lawyer who is Rommy's reluctant court-appointed representative, receives word that another inmate may have new evidence that will exonerate Gandolph.

Arthur's opponent in the case is Muriel Wynn, Kindle County's formidable chief deputy prosecuting attorney, who is considering a run for her boss's job. Muriel and Larry Starczek, the original detective on the case, don't want to see Rommy escape a fate they long ago determined he deserved, for a host of reasons. Further complicating the situation is the fact that Gillian Sullivan, the judge who originally found Rommy guilty, is only recently out of prison herself, having served time for taking bribes.

Scott Turow's compelling, multi-dimensional characters take the reader into Kindle County's parallel yet intersecting worlds of police and small-time crooks, airline executives and sophisticated scammers--and lawyers of all stripes. No other writer offers such a convincing true-to-life picture of how the law and life interact, or such a profound understanding of what is at stake--personally, professionally, and morally--when the state holds the power to end a man's life.
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"Superb" Wall Street Journal
"Plenty of Suspence"" Washington Post Book World
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Loved it.
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A great read!
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The sixth novel from bestseller Turow is a big book about little people in big trouble, involving the death penalty (one of the author's real-life legal specialties), procedural foul-ups and a cast of characters who exemplify the adage about good intentions paving the road to hell. Arthur Raven (a middle-aged, undistinguished lawyer taking care of a schizophrenic sister in a suburb of Chicago) lands a career-making case: the 11th-hour appeal of a quasi-retarded death row inmate, Rommy "Squirrel" Gandolph (accused of triple homicide a decade earlier), on new testimony by a terminally ill convict. Muriel Wynn, an ambitious prosecutor, and Larry Starczek, the detective who originally worked the case, are Raven's adversaries. Plot thickener: Wynn and Starczek are engaged in a longstanding, tortuous, off-again, on-again affair (both being unhappily married) that predates the crime, and which may have indirectly influenced the course of the original investigation. Arthur pulls in the original presiding judge from the case, Gillian Sullivan, just emerging from her own prison stretch for bribery (which masks an even darker secret) to assist him on the case, which leads to another tortuous affair on the defense's side. On top of this (Turow is well known for his many-layered narratives) is the dynamic among the criminals themselves: the dying con may be covering up for his wayward nephew, further muddying the legal waters. The first part of the book, which flips back and forth between the original investigation (1991) and the new trial (2001), is structurally the most demanding, but it is vital to the way in which Turow makes Rommy's case (as well as Arthur's and Muriel's). No character in this novel is entirely likable; all seek to undo some past wrong, with results that get progressively worse. Turow fans should not be disappointed; nor should his publisher.
PUBLISHERS WEEKLY REVIEW
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Death Row inmate Rommy Gandolph insists he's innocent-and new evidence has convinced his court appointed attorney. Once a skeptic, Kindle county corporate lawyer Arthur Raven is now a fervet crusader. But in the world of criminal law he's a rookie squaring off against a D.A. determined to prove she's right, a female judge who served time for taking bribes, and the original detective on the case eager to seal Rommy's doom. The battles are hard-fought and more vicious than anything Raven has ever imagined. Because when the state has the power to kill, everything is life or death.
My first Turow read, was okay but not my favorite style of writing.
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Death Row inmate Rommy Gandolph insists he's innocent--and new evidence has convinced his court-appointed attorney. Once a skeptic, Kindle County corporate lawyer Arthur Raven is now a fervent crusader. But in the world of criminal law he's a rookie squaring off against a D.A. determined to prove she's right, a female judge who served time for taking bribes, and the original detective on the case eager to seal Rommy's doom. The battles are hard-fought and more vicious than anything Raven has ever imagined. Because when the state has the power to kill, everything is life or death.
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Synopsis

"Rommy "Squirrel" Gandolph is a Yellow Man, an inmate on death row for a 1991 triple murder in Kindle County. His slow progress toward certain execution is nearing completion when Arthur Raven, a corporate lawyer who is Rommy's reluctant court-appointed representative, receives word that another inmate may have new evidence that will exonerate Gandolph." Arthur's opponent in the case is Muriel Wynn, Kindle County's formidable chief deputy prosecuting attorney, who is considering a run for her boss's job. Muriel and Larry Starczek, the original detective on the case, don't want to see Rommy escape a fate they long ago determined he deserved, for a host of reasons. Further complicating the situation is the fact that Gillian Sullivan, the judge who originally found Rommy guilty, is only recently out of prison herself, having served time for taking bribes.