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Topic: A Rose for the Crown Ch 1-8

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Subject: A Rose for the Crown Ch 1-8
Date Posted: 12/30/2008 8:19 PM ET
Member Since: 6/1/2007
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Date Posted: 1/2/2009 11:42 AM ET
Member Since: 10/29/2005
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I almost forgot I was supposed to be reading this now, but I pulled it out last night and got started. It's going well, so far.

Date Posted: 1/2/2009 1:45 PM ET
Member Since: 6/1/2007
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I like it so far too.  I'm about 100 pages in.  I'm at work by myself today and thought I'd have some time to get further into it but it has been busy busy busy today :(

Date Posted: 1/2/2009 6:46 PM ET
Member Since: 5/16/2008
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I read the whole book yesterday and today and did like it!

This is my first attempt at participating at a BOM Club and I am not sure of the format, but I'm game for contribution when it gets started.

Date Posted: 1/2/2009 9:08 PM ET
Member Since: 6/1/2007
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Okay I am really not liking Elinor at all.  She obviously really dislikes Kate because Kate is straight off the farm but you think she'd at least give some consideration to the fact that it is making her daughter happy to have her there. 

I really like the authors writing style.  Even though the book is huge when I actually do get time to get going on it, it will probably be something I can breeze through. 

Cary-wow!  The whole book already?  The format for discussion changes every month.  Since this is my month to be "in charge" I just decided to break the book up into four parts and we can discuss whatever we want- likes, dislikes, historical accuracy, things someone wants clarified etc...

Date Posted: 1/4/2009 4:10 PM ET
Member Since: 8/12/2005
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Wow, just 60 pages in, and the obligatory "horrific childbirth scene" has already occurred. ;-)

I knew what Martha's fate would be as soon as it was revealed she was having a difficult pregnancy. The Middle Ages were not kind to childbearing women. Sometimes I wonder why they didn't all rise up and insist on no sex, ever again!

I am enjoying how Smith is weaving tidbits about the political history of the times into conversations. The story hasn't yet gotten bogged down in a long explanation of the dynastic ambitions of Lancaster and York. I have just started reading the chapter in which the Hautes arrive in London for Edward's coronation.

Date Posted: 1/4/2009 5:31 PM ET
Member Since: 6/1/2007
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Yes that was awful.  At least now women in present times women have a choice about pain medication and we actually have real doctors present instead of having to go with the "well y'all serving people are women.  You should know what to do".  I think if I had to leave the birth of my son in the "capable" hands of someone who cleaned my house for me, I probably would have died having him too. 

Date Posted: 1/4/2009 8:08 PM ET
Member Since: 8/30/2007
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I'm 100 pages in, and I'm just not enjoying this. There is something about the wriiting style that is really not engaging me. Sigh.

Date Posted: 1/5/2009 10:55 PM ET
Member Since: 6/1/2007
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Aw, its too bad you're not liking it so far Janelle :(  I actually like her writing style.  I like how she is not letting the history get in the way of the story.  History is good and I don't mind when a book sticks to the facts historically but I don't like the stories that get bogged down with historical fact at the expense of character and story development.  I think she does a good job of avoiding this.

A few questions from the readers guide if anyone wants to comment (***recommend not reading these til you have finished the section***)

1.  When Kate is 10 yrs old, her father tells her the story of how he came into posession of an ecu, a French coin, in order to help her understand the concept of loyalty.  Loyalty is "when you stand by someone you love or honor and do not desert him even in the bad times" he says.  What impact does this conversation have on Kate?

To consider for later: How does the idea of loyalty play out in the story?

Date Posted: 1/6/2009 8:06 PM ET
Member Since: 1/12/2008
Posts: 1,356
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Crap! I've been very busy with a deal at work and I somehow thought we were reading Mary of Nazareth for Jan, and Crown of Thorns in Feb--don't mind me.  I've gotten with the program here and will start it this weekend!

Date Posted: 1/7/2009 9:22 AM ET
Member Since: 7/21/2008
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I picked this up late last night and am through Chapter 3.  I really like the writing style so far, and also think that once I have time to get into this I'll get through it very quickly. 

I agree, I don't like Elinor at all either, but think she is just jealous of Kate because she's so pretty and full of personality, and she already sees that she is going to outshine her own daughter when she gets a bit older and starts attracting men.

Date Posted: 1/7/2009 9:40 AM ET
Member Since: 10/29/2005
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I'm a bit behind because I had to set it aside to read an ILL that finally came through for me, but I'll be back on it by tomorrow.

Date Posted: 1/7/2009 12:07 PM ET
Member Since: 8/12/2005
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I'm just starting Chapter 8 and enjoying the book so far. I like to take short breaks from it to read something else because the book is so long. When I get back to it, it seems really fresh.

I think Smith's descriptions of Middle Ages pomp and pageantry are really good: The food, the music, the banquets. I loved the section on Edward's coronation procession and banquet.

Date Posted: 1/9/2009 11:40 AM ET
Member Since: 7/21/2008
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I made it through chapter 11 last night, and it's still a very quick, enjoyable read for me.  In response to the readers guide question, clearly Kate values loyalty even in the face of her own misfortune.  In this section, a strong example is how she covers for Elinor when repeatedly being provided the opportunity to tell Richard about her abuse to herself and her brother.  In the next section, her loyalty comes out even further when dealing with her husband, but I don't want to spoil anything here.

Date Posted: 1/9/2009 11:43 AM ET
Member Since: 8/12/2005
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Michelle:

I have to admit it bothers me when Kate is loyal to people I don't think have EARNED her loyalty. To me, loyalty has to be earned. None of these people would have been similarly loyal to her.

Date Posted: 1/9/2009 11:47 AM ET
Member Since: 7/21/2008
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I totally agree, Felicia.  I think she's missing the piece of her father's story where both him and his friend showed loyalty to each other.  Perhaps she is showing what is was like to be a woman in those times - how your family (no matter what they are like) comes before yourself.  I certainly can't understand it to the extreme Kate is demonstrating her loyalty!

Date Posted: 1/9/2009 1:39 PM ET
Member Since: 3/23/2008
Posts: 2,451
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My book just arrived yesterday and I finished Nefertiti so I am reading as fast as I can to catch up!!

Date Posted: 1/9/2009 5:59 PM ET
Member Since: 10/29/2005
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Like Felicia, I'm really enjoying the descriptions of everything in this book.  The description of everything is so good that I feel like I'm there. For me, good description is what makes the novel.

I've actually had to look up a couple of the Old English words, but that's okay, I like to learn. I want to look up Smith and see who she is because she has obviously studied the Middle Ages. Don't you think? I'm not very far along in the story, but so far, I haven't come across anything so modern that it jars me out of the story. This is a first book for the author too, right? So far, I'm impressed.

Date Posted: 1/11/2009 11:58 AM ET
Member Since: 3/23/2008
Posts: 2,451
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I think I am into chapter 7 so far and I do like this book.  The author's "voice" sort of reminds of some of Kathleen Woodiwiss' best romance books.  I also like the way she weaves in tidbits of historical details so that you really get the flavor of the time and place.  Kate does seem like the "sweet innocent" like Anya Seton's Katherine; who is learning that the world isn't all romance and fairytales and who trusts and is loyal to people who are unworthy of those qualities.

Date Posted: 1/11/2009 1:16 PM ET
Member Since: 8/12/2005
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I've actually had to look up a couple of the Old English words, but that's okay, I like to learn.

Valli, I was 100 pages into the book before I realized there's a glossary in the back! LOL!

Date Posted: 1/11/2009 5:24 PM ET
Member Since: 6/5/2007
Posts: 2,507
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One of the things that I've been enjoying is (and she talks about this in the author's note, which I always read first) her word usage, she really worked to be sure that while not writing in Old English, she doesn't use current lexicon too.

I kind of see your point, Janelle, I am loving this book and am very engaged in it, but I'm not zipping through it either. 

Date Posted: 1/11/2009 10:22 PM ET
Member Since: 8/12/2005
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To my chagrin, I read this dialogue from Margaret on page 235:

"You must wear horseblinders, child. I am nigh on twenty-eight years and an old nag."

Which must make me, at 38, a crusty, ancient woman! LOL!

By the way, who else besides me thinks that when Kate upchucked following the Christmas revels, it wasn't the oysters that made her sick? ;-)(Hmmm, a bit too much to drink, perhaps?)

 

Date Posted: 1/11/2009 11:27 PM ET
Member Since: 6/5/2007
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Right behind you at 36, and yes, I thought the same thing, giggle.

There was *so* much attention paid to the oysters, I'd not be surprised if it was that in addition to too much to drink. But then, I really hate oysters and the very idea makes my stomach turn.

You and I must be about the same distance in, Felicia.

Date Posted: 1/12/2009 10:44 AM ET
Member Since: 10/29/2005
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I have finally finished this section, and while I'm really enjoying the book, it does feel a bit rushed to me. We met Kate as a child living with her parents, she then matures to a young woman at the home of her uncle where she is married off to an old man who seems to die awfully quickly and leaves her as a young widow. Then, she marries the man she thinks she loves, but finds that he is most definitely not what she expected in a husband. In between all of that, she lost her mother,  managed to save her brother from being hanged for a murder he did not commit, and learned a bit of business from the dead hubby. And, all this happened in just 156 pages. I feel like the author is rushing through the story just to get to the good stuff...R3.  Even with that very minor complaint, I still think it's a good, enjoyable story that is holding my interest.

I read most of chapter nine last night and I'm thinking that the story may slow down a bit now.

Do you guys like learning the life story of a real person through the eyes of a fictional character? I usually do like it this way because it's impossible to really know what a real person was thinking and feeling about the events in their life and I think having a character who reports on the happenings through their eyes gives the author a little leeway in retelling the true events. I've seen authors use this technique really well and really poorly. Now that R3 is entering the story, we'll see how Smith is going to handle it. From reading the first part of the book, I think it's going to be well done.

Oh! One more minor complaint. Fiddle-faddle? Really? That word is annoying me. I haven't looked to see if someone of Kate's time would have used that word, but I feel pretty sure they did not, especially since Smith made sure to let us know that it is a word Kate made up.

Felicia, I had NO idea there was a glossary. Thanks for mentioning it because I wouldn't have found it until after I finished the book!

Date Posted: 1/12/2009 10:46 AM ET
Member Since: 10/29/2005
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I was curious about fiddle-faddle, so looked it up. From what I could find in a very quick search, it seems that fiddle-faddle was first recorded in writing in 1577. That's a bit late for our story, but since Kate made it up, perhaps it took a bit of time to become popular and travel around England. Sure, that's it, lol.



Last Edited on: 1/12/09 10:48 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
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