Book Reviews of Running to the Mountain : A Midlife Adventure

Running to the Mountain : A Midlife Adventure
Running to the Mountain A Midlife Adventure
Author: Jon Katz
ISBN-13: 9780767904988
ISBN-10: 0767904982
Publication Date: 3/2000
Pages: 272
Rating:
  • Currently 2.9/5 Stars.
 23

2.9 stars, based on 23 ratings
Publisher: Broadway
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

7 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Running to the Mountain : A Midlife Adventure on + 337 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
I wasn't expecting this book, but was charmed by it. In this autobiographical piece, Katz find turning 50 means he needs to find the peace and solitude he craves, and thinks of emulating Thomas Merton in some (non-religious) ways. He finds himself with a ramshackled house on a Vermont mountaintop, solitude whose terms he manages to mold for himself, and insights into aging, change, personal need, and personal responsibility.
reviewed Running to the Mountain : A Midlife Adventure on + 169 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This book starts out promising as a "fish out of water" type of story for the first 30 to 50 pages. Jon Katz leaves his wife and ill daughter for over a month to "find himself" in an old ramshackle cabin on a mountain in Upstate New York. Later on he ends up buying the old cabin & starts to fix it up. Throughout the fixing of the cabin the author pleds poverty, yet, he hires the local towns folk to do even the smallest of chores. During the "fish out of water" format this story is cute. But, just as the book settles into this format, the reader is drawn into long-winded discussions of self-imposed isolation and spirituality. These discussions all revolving around the writings of Thomas Merton, the famous hermit-monk of the 50`s and 60`s. It is extremely interesting that the author, who is clearly very knowledgeable about the writings of the devout Catholic, Merton, seems to have drawn absolutely no spiritual belief, guidance or insight from them. It's like reading a book about the impact that Renoir or Monet have made on the art world written by someone who has never seen a painting. At every turn Katz attempts to separate Merton's faithful writings from his faith. This format continues until the end of the book.

Ultimately, it's not one I would read again. It seems from the very beginning that the author is looking for answers, so the reader keeps reading to learn what the author learned. It's like the nonspiritual trying to explain the spiritual. Not my cup of tea.

Started with a bang, ended with a wimper. 2.5 stars.
reviewed Running to the Mountain : A Midlife Adventure on + 169 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This book starts out promising as a "fish out of water" type of story for the first 30 to 50 pages. Jon Katz leaves his wife and ill daughter for over a month to "find himself" in an old ramshackle cabin on a mountain in Upstate New York. Later on he ends up buying the old cabin & starts to fix it up. Throughout the fixing of the cabin the author pleds poverty, yet, he hires the local towns folk to do even the smallest of chores. During the "fish out of water" format this story is cute. But, just as the book settles into this format, the reader is drawn into long-winded discussions of self-imposed isolation and spirituality. These discussions all revolving around the writings of Thomas Merton, the famous hermit-monk of the 50`s and 60`s. It is extremely interesting that the author, who is clearly very knowledgeable about the writings of the devout Catholic, Merton, seems to have drawn absolutely no spiritual belief, guidance or insight from them. It's like reading a book about the impact that Renoir or Monet have made on the art world written by someone who has never seen a painting. At every turn Katz attempts to separate Merton's faithful writings from his faith. This format continues until the end of the book.

Ultimately, it's not one I would read again. It seems from the very beginning that the author is looking for answers, so the reader keeps reading to learn what the author learned. It's like the nonspiritual trying to explain the spiritual. Not my cup of tea.

Started with a bang, ended with a wimper. 2.5 stars.
reviewed Running to the Mountain : A Midlife Adventure on + 7 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Great read. Jon Katz is my new favorite author.
reviewed Running to the Mountain : A Midlife Adventure on + 18 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Great Book! Fast read,I've read his other books and their also very good.This is about him turning 50 and buying a place in the mountains so he can write and be alone with his dogs.
reviewed Running to the Mountain : A Midlife Adventure on + 31 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Good read.
reviewed Running to the Mountain : A Midlife Adventure on + 153 more book reviews
An excellent memoir. I have read several of Jon Katz's books. It made me pause and visualize the mountain and think. The two Labradors are interesting as well.