Book Reviews of Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier

Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier
Scribbling the Cat Travels With an African Soldier
Author: Alexandra Fuller
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ISBN-13: 9780143035015
ISBN-10: 0143035010
Publication Date: 4/26/2005
Pages: 272
Rating:
  • Currently 3.4/5 Stars.
 21

3.4 stars, based on 21 ratings
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

12 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on + 102 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
A few months ago I read Fuller's first book, âDon't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonightâ and I was hooked. First of all, the title is what caught my attention. Once I started reading I found that Fuller has a completely original voice. Her book told the story of her childhood in Rhodesia where her alcoholic parents were fighting to keep one country in Africa run by white people. The poverty, neglect, and blatant racism that were part of her life are just the background texture to her story. As the reader you know that all these things are completely wrong but the child's voice telling the story doesn't. It's just part of her life and that's the way things are. Her use of language is unique; she finds ways to describe sounds with sight words, sights with scent words, and so on, all without being wordy. So when I saw that she had written a second book I had to read it; I was not disappointed! That same unique voice is in this book as well. Now she is an adult, married and living in the US, visiting her parents in Africa. She ends up on a journey with a very religious ex-soldier who is falling in love with her ⦠what could possibly go wrong there?! The best (or worst?!) part of this is that everything is true.
reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on + 102 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A few months ago I read Fuller's first book, âDon't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonightâ and I was hooked. First of all, the title is what caught my attention. Once I started reading I found that Fuller has a completely original voice. Her book told the story of her childhood in Rhodesia where her alcoholic parents were fighting to keep one country in Africa run by white people. The poverty, neglect, and blatant racism that were part of her life are just the background texture to her story. As the reader you know that all these things are completely wrong but the child's voice telling the story doesn't. It's just part of her life and that's the way things are. Her use of language is unique; she finds ways to describe sounds with sight words, sights with scent words, and so on, all without being wordy. So when I saw that she had written a second book I had to read it; I was not disappointed! That same unique voice is in this book as well. Now she is an adult, married and living in the US, visiting her parents in Africa. She ends up on a journey with a very religious ex-soldier who is falling in love with her ⦠what could possibly go wrong there?! The best (or worst?!) part of this is that everything is true.
reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on + 8 more book reviews
An intense look at life in the African civil wars.
reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on + 102 more book reviews
A few months ago I read Fuller's first book, âDon't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonightâ and I was hooked. First of all, the title is what caught my attention. Once I started reading I found that Fuller has a completely original voice. Her book told the story of her childhood in Rhodesia where her alcoholic parents were fighting to keep one country in Africa run by white people. The poverty, neglect, and blatant racism that were part of her life are just the background texture to her story. As the reader you know that all these things are completely wrong but the child's voice telling the story doesn't. It's just part of her life and that's the way things are. Her use of language is unique; she finds ways to describe sounds with sight words, sights with scent words, and so on, all without being wordy. So when I saw that she had written a second book I had to read it; I was not disappointed! That same unique voice is in this book as well. Now she is an adult, married and living in the US, visiting her parents in Africa. She ends up on a journey with a very religious ex-soldier who is falling in love with her ⦠what could possibly go wrong there?! The best (or worst?!) part of this is that everything is true.
reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on + 102 more book reviews
A few months ago I read Fuller's first book, âDon't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonightâ and I was hooked. First of all, the title is what caught my attention. Once I started reading I found that Fuller has a completely original voice. Her book told the story of her childhood in Rhodesia where her alcoholic parents were fighting to keep one country in Africa run by white people. The poverty, neglect, and blatant racism that were part of her life are just the background texture to her story. As the reader you know that all these things are completely wrong but the child's voice telling the story doesn't. It's just part of her life and that's the way things are. Her use of language is unique; she finds ways to describe sounds with sight words, sights with scent words, and so on, all without being wordy. So when I saw that she had written a second book I had to read it; I was not disappointed! That same unique voice is in this book as well. Now she is an adult, married and living in the US, visiting her parents in Africa. She ends up on a journey with a very religious ex-soldier who is falling in love with her ⦠what could possibly go wrong there?! The best (or worst?!) part of this is that everything is true.
reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on
I loved her first book, but this one was a disappointment compared with it, though I did keep on reading until the end. Perhaps it was the subject matter rather than the writing that so turned me off.
reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on + 102 more book reviews
A few months ago I read Fuller's first book, âDon't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonightâ and I was hooked. First of all, the title is what caught my attention. Once I started reading I found that Fuller has a completely original voice. Her book told the story of her childhood in Rhodesia where her alcoholic parents were fighting to keep one country in Africa run by white people. The poverty, neglect, and blatant racism that were part of her life are just the background texture to her story. As the reader you know that all these things are completely wrong but the child's voice telling the story doesn't. It's just part of her life and that's the way things are. Her use of language is unique; she finds ways to describe sounds with sight words, sights with scent words, and so on, all without being wordy. So when I saw that she had written a second book I had to read it; I was not disappointed! That same unique voice is in this book as well. Now she is an adult, married and living in the US, visiting her parents in Africa. She ends up on a journey with a very religious ex-soldier who is falling in love with her ⦠what could possibly go wrong there?! The best (or worst?!) part of this is that everything is true.
reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on + 3 more book reviews
Not as good as "Don't Let's Go To The Dogs Tonight" but a good read nonetheless.
reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on + 7 more book reviews
disturbing/brutal memories for one character
reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on + 120 more book reviews
Even though this is not my favorite memoir by this author, it is still a fully-realized book, and completely worth the time to read.
reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on + 16 more book reviews
Alexandra Fuller's continuing memoir of growing up in Africa.
reviewed Scribbling the Cat: Travels With an African Soldier on + 21 more book reviews
read a few pages