Book Reviews of Secret Missions

Secret Missions
Secret Missions
Author: Michael Gannon
ISBN-13: 9780061092398
ISBN-10: 0061092398
Publication Date: 8/1995
Rating:
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 3

3.7 stars, based on 3 ratings
Publisher: Harpercollins (Mm)
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Secret Missions on + 980 more book reviews
Michael Gannon is an historian who retired as an emeritus professor from a large Florida university. He is well respected for his books on submarine warfare in World War II, early Florida history and the Catholic faith. For his work in the latter two categories, he was knighted by the King of Spain.

To my knowledge, this is his only novel. Into it he works parts of all of his historical works: submarine warfare off Florida's coast, early in World War II; a deadly German spy, landed by a submarine, to secure American air power secrets; and a Catholic priest who seeks to stop the German agent.

While it is an entertaining story, it is apparent that Gannon didn't do as well with the novel as he did with his history books. Having said that, I admit I probably couldn't do any better or even as good. Still, some of the events in the book, especially towards the end, are a little "too pat."

Hopefully, readers who enjoy this novel will continue on to read his historical works. I highly recommend the two books on submarine warfare: "Operation Drumbeat" and "Dark May."
reviewed Secret Missions on + 351 more book reviews
Amazon.com
Historians don't often make good fiction writers, but Michael Gannon's spy novel, Secret Missions, is an entertaining and erudite story set in Florida during the Second World War. An expert on U-boat warfare and the author of Operation Drumbeat and Black May, Gannon makes good use of his knowledge in this tale of a German agent attempting to gather information on the capabilities of American warplanes. The characters are all well drawn, especially the Catholic priest, Father D'Angelo, who learns a vital secret in his confessional but, per the rules of his church, can't reveal the details to anybody. --John J. Miller

From Publishers Weekly
Like his nonfiction debut, Operation Drumbeat, Gannon's routine first novel deals with the threat posed by German U-boats along the American coast during WWII. In 1942, a Nazi sub lands crack secret agent Peter Krug in Florida to secure information on the performance data of U.S. warplanes. Picking up spunky dancer, escort and thief Sally Parkins as a cover, Krug sneaks around the state pursuing his mission. Meanwhile, Catholic priest Tony D'Angelo learns of Krug's presence while hearing the confession of a guilt-ridden accomplice of the German spy. Bound by sacramental seal to reveal nothing to the authorities, D'Angelo, aided by an attractive female pilot, goes after the Nazi in a chase that concludes in a dramatic confrontation between a U-boat and a U.S. flying boat. Gannon is at his best describing the details of U-boat life and of the theological challenges that confront D'Angelo as he tracks Krug without betraying his priesthood.
reviewed Secret Missions on + 111 more book reviews
Like his nonfiction debut, Operation Drumbeat, Gannon's routine first novel deals with the threat posed by German U-boats along the American coast during WWII. In 1942, a Nazi sub lands crack secret agent Peter Krug in Florida to secure information on the performance data of U.S. warplanes. Picking up spunky dancer, escort and thief Sally Parkins as a cover, Krug sneaks around the state pursuing his mission. Meanwhile, Catholic priest Tony D'Angelo learns of Krug's presence while hearing the confession of a guilt-ridden accomplice of the German spy. Bound by sacramental seal to reveal nothing to the authorities, D'Angelo, aided by an attractive female pilot, goes after the Nazi in a chase that concludes in a dramatic confrontation between a U-boat and a U.S. flying boat. Gannon is at his best describing the details of U-boat life and of the theological challenges that confront D'Angelo as he tracks Krug without betraying his priesthood. But with the exception of Parkins, who's appealing as an unapologetic gold digger, the novel's characters are unconvincing. In addition, the espionage/confessional plot-tangle is sorely contrived and owes more than a little to Ken Follett's Eye of the Needle and the classic Hitchcock film I Confess.