Book Reviews of The Seven Daughters of Eve

The Seven Daughters of Eve
The Seven Daughters of Eve
Author: Bryan Sykes
ISBN-13: 9780393323146
ISBN-10: 0393323145
Publication Date: 5/2002
Pages: 306
Rating:
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 27

4.2 stars, based on 27 ratings
Publisher: W. W. Norton Company
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

12 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on + 67 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Excellent viewpoint backed by scientific discovery.
reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on + 177 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This book is much broader in scope than I had expected. The whole contentious debate over the reliability of mitochondrial DNA typing is here, as well as several very interesting historical accounts, including the discovery of the Iceman (frozen in the alps for several centuries) and the story of the recovery and identification of the remains of the Romanovs. Of course, the process of identifying the seven maternal ancestors of most European is here. Bryan Sykes demonstrates that he is also quite able as a historical fiction writer, as he invents the unknowable details of the lives of each of the seven based on the archeological evidence collected from the regions suggested by the genetic confluence. Overall, a well written and easily accessible book.
reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on + 1110 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Sykes has written a very clear and interesting survey of the research into mitochondrial DNA. The discovery of this genetic component, passed down only from mother to daughter and traceable through many, many generations, has illuminated some intriguing mysteries of culture and archaeology. Researchers have been able to track Polynesian DNA to its most probable origins, and to uncover the patterns of changing societies as ancient groups spread through Europe. The imagined biographies of the seven daughters are entirely speculative, of course, but serve to put them in historical perspective, and also add a very human face to them all. Finishing the book, I couldn't help wondering which of Eve's daughters is in my own DNA.
reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on + 177 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This book is much broader in scope than I had expected. The whole contentious debate over the reliability of mitochondrial DNA typing is here, as well as several very interesting historical accounts, including the discovery of the Iceman (frozen in the alps for several centuries) and the story of the recovery and identification of the remains of the Romanovs. Of course, the process of identifying the seven maternal ancestors of most European is here. Bryan Sykes demonstrates that he is also quite able as a historical fiction writer, as he invents the unknowable details of the lives of each of the seven based on the archeological evidence collected from the regions suggested by the genetic confluence. Overall, a well written and easily accessible book.
reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on + 2 more book reviews
really good.
reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on
Sykes nicely balances hard science on genetics with "stories" about how each of the seven "Eve's" lived. I wish I could afford to be tested so that I could find out which of the seven I am descended from.
reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on + 5463 more book reviews
Good book, especially at the beginning. The author writes with a certainty that belies his background in public media. I get the impression he has pissed off a lot of his fellow scientists. Egads, the information in this book is over a decade old.
reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on + 535 more book reviews
I am having a tough time with the premise of this book. If the reader accepts the premise, then maybe you can absorb his constructs. I have had a very hard time even just getting thru the premises. Maybe I am reading it all wrong, but I cannot buy his conclusions.
reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on + 87 more book reviews
Very interesting information about European DNA.
reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on + 163 more book reviews
I really enjoyed this book. I'm a genealogist so I'm excited and fascinated by the new developments in DNA research and how it might help link people with common ancestors. Even just watching shows on TV like CSI makes one interested in forensics and DNA.

In this book, the author describes his research in genetics with mitochondrial DNA, which is passed down from mother to children. The book also includes a touch of history and archaelogy.

The actual examples of cases where DNA proved or disproved the identity of people was interesting, like when they proved a group of bodies they found were the Tsar and his family that were killed, but they proved that the lady claiming to be Anastasia was really NOT one of the missing daughters. I highly recommend this book.
reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on + 47 more book reviews
This book really helped me to understand mitochondrial DNA. Very helpful. Enjoyed the "recreations" of the lives of these seven women to give a feel for what our forebears might have experienced. Creative and engaging but with science as a foundation. Thumbs up.
reviewed The Seven Daughters of Eve on + 141 more book reviews
Gripping!!!