Book Reviews of Sex and Other Sacred Games: Love, Desire, Passion, and Possession

Sex and Other Sacred Games: Love, Desire, Passion, and Possession
Sex and Other Sacred Games Love Desire Passion and Possession
Author: Renate Stendhal
ISBN-13: 9780449904633
ISBN-10: 0449904636
Publication Date: 5/19/1990
Pages: 271
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 1

4 stars, based on 1 rating
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

2 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Sex and Other Sacred Games: Love, Desire, Passion, and Possession on + 12 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Reading this book was a new experience for me. It was like looking at a fine impressionist painting. There is so much that reveals itself to you as the story unfolds. The writing imparts images and feeling upon your thoughts as you read. The words are so rich and evocative it is like the author is using your imagination as a canvas. Highly recommend this book for the reader who is ready to have thought-provoking, interesting experience in reading. This is not a preachy book or an explicit book. Looking forward to hearing how other readers enjoyed this book.
reviewed Sex and Other Sacred Games: Love, Desire, Passion, and Possession on
Sex and Other Sacred Games is an imaginative look at sexuality, in which a chance encounter in a Paris cafe sets off a parley, a heated discussion, an on-going dialogue, between a feminist and a femme fatale. While following the development of their relationship, the book explores all facets of passion, eroticism, and pleasure. Together, they consider the possibility of women redefining desire. The book consistently raises essential issues regarding our traditional views of sex. The two women challenge us to reconsider the meaning and making of love. They invite us to the sacred game, where sexual identity, pleasure and desire can all be re-discovered or invented from scratch.

"Sex and Other Sacred Games explores that territory where Lesbian Desire tends to come most violently undone; in the heart and bowels of a love relationship. Essentially, the book is an extended conversation between two women on the subject of sex. In the course of the conversation, which is laced with echoes of Platonic dialogue, the women fall in love. What makes this dialogue both highly charged and evocative of a whole chapter of feminist history is that one of the women, Alma Runau, is a Lesbian Feminist and the other, Claire Heller, is a self-declared (heterosexual) femme fatale."

- Trivia: A Journal of Ideas, 1991