Book Reviews of Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809

Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809
Sharpe's Eagle Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809
Author: Bernard Cornwell
PBS Market Price: $8.09 or $4.19+1 credit
ISBN-13: 9780451212573
ISBN-10: 0451212576
Publication Date: 8/3/2004
Pages: 288
Rating:
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 29

3.9 stars, based on 29 ratings
Publisher: Signet Book
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

12 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 134 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This series has been made into PBS series "Sharpe's Rifles." In this book Richard has been made a captain.
reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 14 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
An exciting look at one of the little-known battles of the Napoleonic Wars. An interesting look at the life of the soldiers of the British Army in the early 19th century. A good read for the historical novel buff.
reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 22 more book reviews
This is part of an excellent series. I am only swapping because I have multiple copies.
reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 108 more book reviews
Richard Sharpe and his riflemen have the bad fortune to be placed under the command of Colonel Simmerson, who has a lot of political influence, a very high opinion of himself, and absolutely no idea how to command men in battle.

Simmerson quickly proves that he has one talent. He can screw things up royally. And, when he does, he writes home to his important connections explaining that he had nothing to do with the debacle. No, it was all Sharpe's fault.

So Sharpe is stuck taking orders from a man who hates him, in an army trying to defeat the experienced, successful French. And their Spanish allies are so bad that they might as well be fighting for the French.

This book has lots of action, vivid characters, and even a little romance. Mr. Cornwell is a accomplished storyteller. I even learned a little history. Join the fun and get to know Sharpe. You won't regret it.
reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 8 more book reviews
Captain Richard Sharpe-bold, professinal, and ruthless-is leading his battle-hardened veterans against Napolean at Talavera in the bloodiest Peninsula battle yet. Sharpe ha fought his way out of the enlisted ranks and earned his captaincy. But others-such as his uncle, Colonel Henry Simmerson, and the foppish Lieutenant Gibbons-are incompetents who bought their commissions. After their cowardly loss of the Regimental King's colour, their resentment of the upstart Sharpe turns to outright treachery.
reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 3 more book reviews
Very good
reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 8 (and the original Book 2) of the Richard Sharpe Series.

Cornwell has the ability to develop delightfully appalling characters to throw against Sharpe, and this book is no exception. In Sharpes Eagle, that character is Colonel Henry Simmerson, the equally arrogant and clueless leader of the East Sussex Regiment who has a murderous hatred for our beloved and long-suffering Lieutenant.

This is yet another outstanding installment in the Richard Sharpe series. For three books in a row, Cornwell has truly delivered. The plots, pacing, and character development have all been spot on. The books still retain a hint of their formulaic predictability (how many times can Sharpe really be that much of a battle-winning, bullet proof hero anyway?) but I am willing to suspend a little belief for the sake of reading another great story.
reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 8 (and the original Book 2) of the Richard Sharpe Series.

Cornwell has the ability to develop delightfully appalling characters to throw against Sharpe, and this book is no exception. In Sharpes Eagle, that character is Colonel Henry Simmerson, the equally arrogant and clueless leader of the East Sussex Regiment who has a murderous hatred for our beloved and long-suffering Lieutenant.

This is yet another outstanding installment in the Richard Sharpe series. For three books in a row, Cornwell has truly delivered. The plots, pacing, and character development have all been spot on. The books still retain a hint of their formulaic predictability (how many times can Sharpe really be that much of a battle-winning, bullet proof hero anyway?) but I am willing to suspend a little belief for the sake of reading another great story.
reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 8 (and the original Book 2) of the Richard Sharpe Series.

Cornwell has the ability to develop delightfully appalling characters to throw against Sharpe, and this book is no exception. In Sharpes Eagle, that character is Colonel Henry Simmerson, the equally arrogant and clueless leader of the East Sussex Regiment who has a murderous hatred for our beloved and long-suffering Lieutenant.

This is yet another outstanding installment in the Richard Sharpe series. For three books in a row, Cornwell has truly delivered. The plots, pacing, and character development have all been spot on. The books still retain a hint of their formulaic predictability (how many times can Sharpe really be that much of a battle-winning, bullet proof hero anyway?) but I am willing to suspend a little belief for the sake of reading another great story.
reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 658 more book reviews
Mr. Sharpe is not in dire straits during the first few chapters, but is unhappy because he sees no possible path to promotion. His regiment is still in England, while he and a few riflemen are valued assets in the fights in the Iberian Peninsula. A somewhat mysterious young lady is traveling with the army.....
reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 8 (and the original Book 2) of the Richard Sharpe Series.

Cornwell has the ability to develop delightfully appalling characters to throw against Sharpe, and this book is no exception. In Sharpes Eagle, that character is Colonel Henry Simmerson, the equally arrogant and clueless leader of the East Sussex Regiment who has a murderous hatred for our beloved and long-suffering Lieutenant.

This is yet another outstanding installment in the Richard Sharpe series. For three books in a row, Cornwell has truly delivered. The plots, pacing, and character development have all been spot on. The books still retain a hint of their formulaic predictability (how many times can Sharpe really be that much of a battle-winning, bullet proof hero anyway?) but I am willing to suspend a little belief for the sake of reading another great story.
reviewed Sharpe's Eagle: Richard Sharpe and the Talavera Campaign July 1809 on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 8 (and the original Book 2) of the Richard Sharpe Series.

Cornwell has the ability to develop delightfully appalling characters to throw against Sharpe, and this book is no exception. In Sharpes Eagle, that character is Colonel Henry Simmerson, the equally arrogant and clueless leader of the East Sussex Regiment who has a murderous hatred for our beloved and long-suffering Lieutenant.

This is yet another outstanding installment in the Richard Sharpe series. For three books in a row, Cornwell has truly delivered. The plots, pacing, and character development have all been spot on. The books still retain a hint of their formulaic predictability (how many times can Sharpe really be that much of a battle-winning, bullet proof hero anyway?) but I am willing to suspend a little belief for the sake of reading another great story.