Book Reviews of Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7)

Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7)
Sharpe's Havoc Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal Spring 1809 - Sharpe, Bk 7
Author: Bernard Cornwell
ISBN-13: 9780060566708
ISBN-10: 0060566701
Publication Date: 3/2004
Pages: 336
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 28

4.1 stars, based on 28 ratings
Publisher: Perennial
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

10 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7) on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 7 of the Richard Sharpe Series.

This is another one of the filler books that was written to beef up the original series. However, unlike Sharpes Prey (which was a true prequel) Cornwell managed to slip this story between the first two books of the original series, and its something he did quite seamlessly. It provided an excellent bridge between Sharpes Rifles and Sharpes Eagle and I feel like the series is better because of it.

While this book contains its fair share of blood, gore, and battle, the majority of the book is spent on the quieter aspects of a war waged through intrigue, espionage, politics, and treason. Cornwell also takes this opportunity to further develop Sharpe and Harper, and for that reason alone it is an important (and enjoyable) addition to the series as a whole.
reviewed Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7) on + 108 more book reviews
Sharpe and his riflemen, get caught on the wrong side of the river Douro when the French take Oporto. They also have to deal with a slippery character from the British Foreign Office who is up to something mysterious and possibly treasonous. And then there is their assignment to rescue a runaway English girl.

They manage to survive and even do a bit of damage before, finally, Sir Arthur Wellesley shows up to take over the British army and things start looking up.

As usual I was completely caught up in this book. Cornwell tells an excellent story and handles battles so well that I almost understand what is going on. And believe me, that is a major accomplishment.
reviewed Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7) on + 112 more book reviews
Lots of action and gore! A real page turner you won't be able to put down!
reviewed Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7) on + 216 more book reviews
Action oriented way to read up on a little history circa 1809.

About the Author
Bernard Cornwell is the author of the acclaimed Richard Sharpe series, set during the Napoleonic Wars; the Nathaniel Starbuck Chronicles, about American Civil War; the Warlord Trilogy, about Arthurian England; and, most recently, Stonehenge 2000 B.C.: A Novel and The Archer's Tale. Mr. Cornwell lives with his wife on Cape Cod.

Publishers Weekly
Sharpe fans who may have worried that Cornwell's popular series was drawing to a close can heave a sigh of relief-the 19th entry (after 2002's Sharpe's Prey) brings the up-from-the-ranks rifleman back to the Peninsular War where the series began, among such familiar comrades-in-arms as Sergeant Harper and the "old poacher" Dan Hagman. In the treacherous villain role without which no Sharpe adventure would be complete, the Shakespeare-quoting Colonel Christopher plays both sides of the fence in an effort to contrive a peace between the warring parties that will leave him a rich man. But Christopher hasn't reckoned with the new British commander, Sir Arthur Wellesley, the future Duke of Wellington, who arrives in time to catch Marshal Soult's invading army by surprise. Meanwhile, Sharpe and his men, cut off in a Portuguese village, hold off superior French forces with the aid of Lieutenant Vicente, a Portuguese lawyer, poet and philosopher turned soldier. Sharpe's antilawyer barbs, as well as some later banter about the troubled relations between the English and Irish and between the Spanish and Portuguese, provide comic relief, while Kate Savage, a naive 19-year-old Englishwoman seduced by Christopher, lends relatively minor romantic interest. A delicious scene at Wellesley's headquarters, in which Sharpe has to account for his seemingly inactive role, will please aficionados, as will the ringing words with which Cornwell closes his customary afterword on the historical background: "So Sharpe and Harper will march again."
reviewed Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7) on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 7 of the Richard Sharpe Series.

This is another one of the filler books that was written to beef up the original series. However, unlike Sharpes Prey (which was a true prequel) Cornwell managed to slip this story between the first two books of the original series, and its something he did quite seamlessly. It provided an excellent bridge between Sharpes Rifles and Sharpes Eagle and I feel like the series is better because of it.

While this book contains its fair share of blood, gore, and battle, the majority of the book is spent on the quieter aspects of a war waged through intrigue, espionage, politics, and treason. Cornwell also takes this opportunity to further develop Sharpe and Harper, and for that reason alone it is an important (and enjoyable) addition to the series as a whole.
reviewed Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7) on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 7 of the Richard Sharpe Series.

This is another one of the filler books that was written to beef up the original series. However, unlike Sharpes Prey (which was a true prequel) Cornwell managed to slip this story between the first two books of the original series, and its something he did quite seamlessly. It provided an excellent bridge between Sharpes Rifles and Sharpes Eagle and I feel like the series is better because of it.

While this book contains its fair share of blood, gore, and battle, the majority of the book is spent on the quieter aspects of a war waged through intrigue, espionage, politics, and treason. Cornwell also takes this opportunity to further develop Sharpe and Harper, and for that reason alone it is an important (and enjoyable) addition to the series as a whole.
reviewed Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7) on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 7 of the Richard Sharpe Series.

This is another one of the filler books that was written to beef up the original series. However, unlike Sharpes Prey (which was a true prequel) Cornwell managed to slip this story between the first two books of the original series, and its something he did quite seamlessly. It provided an excellent bridge between Sharpes Rifles and Sharpes Eagle and I feel like the series is better because of it.

While this book contains its fair share of blood, gore, and battle, the majority of the book is spent on the quieter aspects of a war waged through intrigue, espionage, politics, and treason. Cornwell also takes this opportunity to further develop Sharpe and Harper, and for that reason alone it is an important (and enjoyable) addition to the series as a whole.
reviewed Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7) on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 7 of the Richard Sharpe Series.

This is another one of the filler books that was written to beef up the original series. However, unlike Sharpes Prey (which was a true prequel) Cornwell managed to slip this story between the first two books of the original series, and its something he did quite seamlessly. It provided an excellent bridge between Sharpes Rifles and Sharpes Eagle and I feel like the series is better because of it.

While this book contains its fair share of blood, gore, and battle, the majority of the book is spent on the quieter aspects of a war waged through intrigue, espionage, politics, and treason. Cornwell also takes this opportunity to further develop Sharpe and Harper, and for that reason alone it is an important (and enjoyable) addition to the series as a whole.
reviewed Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7) on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 7 of the Richard Sharpe Series.

This is another one of the filler books that was written to beef up the original series. However, unlike Sharpes Prey (which was a true prequel) Cornwell managed to slip this story between the first two books of the original series, and its something he did quite seamlessly. It provided an excellent bridge between Sharpes Rifles and Sharpes Eagle and I feel like the series is better because of it.

While this book contains its fair share of blood, gore, and battle, the majority of the book is spent on the quieter aspects of a war waged through intrigue, espionage, politics, and treason. Cornwell also takes this opportunity to further develop Sharpe and Harper, and for that reason alone it is an important (and enjoyable) addition to the series as a whole.
reviewed Sharpe's Havoc : Richard Sharpe and the Campaign in Northern Portugal, Spring 1809 (Sharpe, Bk 7) on + 742 more book reviews
As expected in this series, Mr. Cornwell has a brisk beginning. I have only read the first fifty pages thus far, but the protagonist and his platoon are stuck on the wrong side of the Douro River with the French rapidly occupying northern Portugal. He again demonstrates his knowledge of tactics and seems to be developing a small amount of patience in order to get the best effort from his allies, i.e. a 37 member group of Portuguese militia led by a lieutenant with two weeks experience....
The Lt. does have some interaction with higher ranking officers and strategy, perhaps more than in earlier books. I anticipate he will rise to the rank of Capt. soon. The scenes are still described in a bloody way, apparently that being what Mr. Cornwell's readers desire.