Book Reviews of The Other Side of the Bridge

The Other Side of the Bridge
The Other Side of the Bridge
Author: Mary Lawson
ISBN-13: 9780385340380
ISBN-10: 0385340389
Publication Date: 8/28/2007
Pages: 320
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 26

3.8 stars, based on 26 ratings
Publisher: Dial Press Trade Paperback
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

11 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Other Side of the Bridge on + 265 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I read Crow Lake a few years back and had really enjoyed it; decided to see if I'd like this one as much. I don't know what it is exactly about her writing but I thoroughly loved it, the way the characters were each so strongly portrayed and believable. I read a lot and Mary Lawson just has something many authors don't--now if I only I could put my finger on what it was. Depth?
reviewed The Other Side of the Bridge on + 16 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
The story is told in alternating chapters. Two distinct stories in their own right, running together and intersecting. The story of Arthur Dunn and his brother Jake growing up in the 1930's and Ian Christopherson's story of coming to age in a small northern town in the 50's. Ian and Arthur are the tie that bind the stories together. Slowly and gently taking us through the lives of these two men and building to the inescapable explosion between brothers.

I like stories about family struggles, we all have them don't we? I love looking at the dynamic of relationships. This book hit home for me in two ways, Arthur has a 'co-dependent' relationship with his mother. He felt responsible for her happiness. Somewhere along the lines in their lives she sent that message to him. I had the same dynamic in my relationship with my mom. So I could identify with Arthur. There was Jake the brother whom the mom treated with kid gloves, I have a handicap brother. Same dynamic. With Ian one of his parents abandons the family and he has to learn to come to terms with that. My dad left us when I was a teenager.

The setting is really far north in Ontario Canada, small town life, farm life. Ms. Lawson puts you right there in that bitter cold winter. Pulls at your heartstrings when a horse gets sick in the middle of a blizzard, they can't get to the vet. Ian has a Native Indian best friend from the reservation and we see the tensions between the Indians and the white man.Throw in World War II and the hardships and the terrible loss.

I loved Arthur and as much as you want to dislike Jake you have to wonder why? Why does he do the things he does? The dynamics between the brothers really is the crux of the story and it is a very well told one. I'm very glad she decided to tell this story from Arthur's point of view instead of Jake's. Their dad was a silent man and even though he doesn't say much, I think his relationship with each of the boys speaks volumes. I can't recommend this enough if you like family dramas!
reviewed The Other Side of the Bridge on + 2 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I enjoyed this book. It is very well written and the story is interesting. I enjoyed Mary Lawson's first book - Crow Lake - much more. Crow Lake is one of my favorite books of all time.
reviewed The Other Side of the Bridge on + 18 more book reviews
great writing. a surprise favorite
reviewed The Other Side of the Bridge on + 636 more book reviews
Lawson returned to a small Northern Canadian town for her second novel, which I enjoyed very much. It was rather predictable, but still fun to read - I especially enjoyed how the chapters, narrators and timelines switched back and forth. All in all, it was a good book with a solid story.
reviewed The Other Side of the Bridge on
Fantastic book....the beginning was a little slow but I hit a certain point and couldn't put it down. The descriptions of the town and characters were great...the relationships between the characters were wonderful as well. I ordered her first book because this one was such a fabulous read. I'm going to keep this one on the shelf to read again...I enjoyed it that much. Great book for a book club to read.
reviewed The Other Side of the Bridge on + 26 more book reviews
I love Mary Lawson!
reviewed The Other Side of the Bridge on + 214 more book reviews
Arthur and Jake Dunn, are the sons of a farmer in the mid-1930s and are the complete opposite of each other. The book takes you through thier childhood all the way to thier Adulthood. Telling tells of thier struggles to deal with each other and with the beautiful young woman that finds both of thier full attention.
I did find my self getting lost on what was going on here and their, the chapters bounce back and forth from 1940's to the 60's. I had a hard time getting into it but once I did I enjoyed the story line.
reviewed The Other Side of the Bridge on + 55 more book reviews
Two for two for Mary Lawson. This one is another home run! Man, this woman can write! I challenge anyone to pick up this book, read two pages and still be able to put it down. Crow Lake hooked me first. This, her second book is, if anything, better yet. Highly, highly recommend to anyone who enjoys good fiction and great writing.
reviewed The Other Side of the Bridge on + 214 more book reviews
Arthur and Jake Dunn, are the sons of a farmer in the mid-1930s and are the complete opposite of each other. The book takes you through thier childhood all the way to thier Adulthood. Telling tells of thier struggles to deal with each other and with the beautiful young woman that finds both of thier full attention.
I did find my self getting lost on what was going on here and their, the chapters bounce back and forth from 1940's to the 60's. I had a hard time getting into it but once I did I enjoyed the story line.
reviewed The Other Side of the Bridge on + 262 more book reviews
Mary Lawson has written a story that grabbed me before the end of the first chapter and I felt like I was living the lives of the good people and disliking the bad. It wasn't so much that I couldn't put it down, but rather that I knew these people and they were part of my town and I lived there too, so I had to stay involved.