Book Reviews of Silent Honor

Silent Honor
Silent Honor
Author: Danielle Steel
ISBN-13: 9780385313018
ISBN-10: 0385313012
Publication Date: 1996
Pages: 353
Rating:
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 69

3.7 stars, based on 69 ratings
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

30 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Silent Honor on + 22 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
If you enjoy Danielle Steel books here is another one to enjoy. She wrote this book with the same kind of way of tugging at your heartstrings she always does. Its about how the Japanese Americans were treated here at home during WWII. Highly recommend.
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Helpful Score: 1
At 18, Hiroko faces an unfamiliar culture and racial prejudice when she arrives to attend college in America. Her American cousins and Peter, their Caucasian friend, help her adapt to her new life, but nothing can prepare them for what follows the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Suddenly viewed as enemies, Japanese residents and even U.S. citizens of Japanese descent are deprived of jobs, property, and freedom and sent to internment camps. Secretly married to Peter before he enters the army, Hiroko endures many hardships and losses in the camps. Believing Peter to be missing in action, she returns to Japan after the war only to discover that her entire family has perished. At this bleakest moment in her life, Peter reappears, providing the promise of a happy future. Although it may be predictable, this novel is a reminder of a shameful episode in American history that should not be forgotten.
LIBRARY JOURNAL REVIEW
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Helpful Score: 1
Excellent story set during World War II when some American citizens who happened to be Japanese were placed in interment camps. A love story that has a happy ending...
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Helpful Score: 1
Danielle Steel never disappoints!
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Helpful Score: 1
Was so suprised by the things that happeded to the Japanese who were actually born in america and the ones who were here at the time of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, this was actually my second time to read this book and I had the same feelings each time.
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Danielle Steel has done it again!
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This is one of my favorite Danielle Steel books,I have learn so much of American History from her books.And the way Asia Americans were treaded after Pearl Harbor,it was nothing short of what happened in the consentration camps. I am Native American and I know what it's like to be differt in America, I wish everyone could read this book!
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This book is amazing! A seldom seen insight into this period seen from the eyes of a few individuals who were jailed in the Japanese concentration camps of America. She got into the feelings of having all your worldy possessions taken. The feelings suffered from the prejudice & discrimination by Caucasion Americans against American citizens of Japanese descent. Danielle Steel wrote an fascinating novel against the backdrop of a shameful part of the American past while documenting an important piece of American history.Could we believe that it happened here? Well it did. Lest we forget. "Those who don't remember our history, doomed to repeat it". Good job Danielle Steel
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Abridged - 360 minutes playing time - 4 cassettes
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Good story by Steel, enjoy her writing. Excellent story.
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"...both living history and outstanding fiction....."
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A man ahead of his time, Japanese college professor Masao Takashimaya of Kyoto had a passion for modern ideas that was as strong as his wife's belief in ancient traditions. His eighteen-year-old daughter Hiroko, torn between her mother's traditions and her father's wishes, boarded the SS Nagoya Maru to come to California for an education and to make her father proud. I was August 1941.
From the ship, she went to the Palo Alto home of her uncle, Takeo, and his family. To Hiroko, California was a different world. Her cousins had become more American than Japanese. And much to Hiroko's surprise, Peter Jenkins, her uncle's assistant at Stanford, became an unexpected link between her old world and her new.
On December 7, Pearl Harbor is bombed by the Japanese. Within hours, war is declared and suddenly Hiroko has become an enemy in a foreign land.
On February 19, Executive Order 9066 is signed by President Roosevelt, giving military the power to remove the Japanese from their communities at will. Takeo and his family are given ten days to sell their home, give up their jobs, and report to a relocation center, along with thousands of other Japanese and Japanese Americans, to face their destinies there. Families are divided, people are forced to abandon their homes, their businesses, their freedom, and their lives.
reviewed Silent Honor on + 9 more book reviews
In her 38th bestselling novel, Danielle Steel creates a powerful, moving portrayal of families divided, lives shattered and a nation torn apart by prejudice during a shameful episode in recent American history.

A man ahead of his time, Japanese college professor Masao Takashimaya of Kyoto had a passion for modern ideas that was as strong as his wife's belief in ancient traditions. It was the early 1920s and Masao had dreams for the futureand a fascination with the politics and opportunities of a world that was changing every day. Twenty years later, his eighteen-year-old daughter Hiroko, torn between her mother's traditions and her father's wishes, boarded the SS Nagoya Maru to come to California for an education and to make her father proud. It was August 1941.

From the ship, she went directly to the Palo Alto home of her uncle, Takeo, and his family. To Hiroko, California was a different worlda world of barbeques, station wagons and college. Her cousins in California had become more American than Japanese. And much to Hiroko's surprise, Peter Jenkins, her uncle's assistant at Stanford, became an unexpected link between her old world and her new. But in spite of him, and all her promises to her father, Hiroko longs to go home. At college in Berkeley, her world is rapidly and unexpectedly filled with prejudice and fear.

On December 7, Pearl Harbor is bombed by the Japanese. Within hours, war is declared and suddenly Hiroko has become an enemy in a foreign land. Terrified, begging to go home, she is nonetheless ordered by her father to stay. He is positive she will be safer in California than at home, and for a brief time she isuntil her entire world caves in.

On February 19, Executive Order 9066 is signed by President Roosevelt, giving the military the power to remove the Japanese from their communities at will. Takeo and his family are given ten days to sell their home, give up their jobs, and report to a relocation center, along with thousands of other Japanese and Japanese Americans, to face their destinies there. Families are divided, people are forced to abandon their homes, their businesses, their freedom, and their lives. Hiroko and her uncle's family go first to Tanforan, and from there to the detention center at Tule Lake. This extraordinary novel tells what happened to them there, creating a portrait of human tragedy and strength, divided loyalties and love. It tells of Americans who were treated as foreigners in their own land. And it tells Hiroko's story, and that of her American family, as they fight to stay alive amid the drama of life and death in the camp at Tule Lake.

With clear, powerful prose, Danielle Steel portrays not only the human cost of that terrible time in history, but also the remarkable courage of a people whose honor and dignity transcended the chaos that surrounded them. Set against a vivid backdrop of war and change, her thirty-eighth bestselling novel is both living history and outstanding fiction, revealing the stark truth about the betrayal of Americans by their own government...and the triumph of a woman caught between cultures and determined to survive.
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A reminder of a shameful episode in American history that should not be forgotten. An extremely moving book - a realistic portrayal of the Japanese Americans at this period in our turbulent history.
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(from the back)
A man ahead of his time, Japanese college professor Masao Takashimaya of Kyoto had a passion for modern ideas that was as strong as his wife's belief in acient traditions. His eighteen-year-old daughter Hiroko, torn between her mother's traditions and her father's wishes, boarded the SS Nagoya Maru to come to California for an education and to make her father proud. It was August 1941.
From the ship, she went to the Palo Alto home of her uncle, Takeo, and his family. To Hiroko, California was a different world. Her cousins had become more American the Japanese. And much to Hiroko's surprise, Peter Jenkins, her uncle's assistant at Stanford became an unexpected link between her old world and her new.
On December 7, Pearl Harbor is bombed by the Japanese.
Within hours, war is declared and suddenly Hiroko has become an enemy in a foreign land.

On February 19, Executive Order 9066 is signed by President Roosevelt, giving the military the power to remove the Japanese from their communities at will. Takeo and his family are given ten days to sell their home, give up their jobs, and report to a relocation center, along with thousands of other Japanese and Japanese Americans, to face their destinies there. Families are divided, people are forced to abandon their homes, their buisnesses, their freedom, and their lives.
reviewed Silent Honor on + 3389 more book reviews
A man ahead of his time. Japanese college professor, Masao Takashimaya of Kyoto had a passion for modern ideas that was as strong as his wife's belief in ancient traditions. His eighteen-year-old daughter Horoko, torn between her mother's traditions and her father's wishes, boarded the SS Nagoya Matu to come to Califofrnia for an education and to make her father proud. It was August 1941.
From the ship she went to the Palo Alto home of her uncle and his family. California was a different world. Her cousins had become more American than Japnese. And much to her surprise, Peter Jenkins, her uncle's assistant at Stanford became an unexpected link between her old world and her new.
On December 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor is bombed by the Japanese. Within hours war is declared and sudenly Hiroko has become an enemy in a foreign land.
Steel portrays not only the human cost of the terrible time in history, but also the remarkable courage of a people whose honor and dignity transcended the chaos that surrounded them. Silent Honor reveals the stark truth about the betrayal of Americans by their own government...and the triumph of a woman caught between cultures and determined to survive.
reviewed Silent Honor on + 273 more book reviews
In her thirty-eigth bestselling novel,Danielle Steel creates a powerful. moving portrayal of families devided,lives shattered,and a nation torn apart by prejudice during a shamful episode in recent American history.
reviewed Silent Honor on + 39 more book reviews
Hiroko, born in Japan, living in California with her uncle meets Peter Sanford. Pearl Harbor is bombed. President Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066 allowing the military to remove Japanese families from their communities at will.
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i thought it was good. you really felt for the character.
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Great read
reviewed Silent Honor on
This is a LARGE PRINT EDITION!
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I read this book a few years ago - found it recently while cleaning out my parents' garage. Class Danielle Steel love story! :)
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A Very Good Read!!
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I really enjoyed this book. Its as much about Pearl Harbor as it is a love story.
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A wonderful story of honor.
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Excellent story about a tragic time in our history.
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Another hit by Ms. Steel. It puts you in someone else's shoes. Great read.
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THIS IS MY FAVORITE DANIELLE STEEL BOOK. I HAD HEARD ABOUT THE JAPANESE INTERNMENT DURING WORLD WAR II BUT I HAD NO IDEA HOW CRUEL AND HORRIBLE IT WAS. THERE IS NO WAY WE CAN EVER REPAY THEM FOR THEIR SUFFERING AND LOSS. OBVIOUSLY THE TOPIC TOUCHED MS STEEL AS MUCH S IT TOUCHED ME. SHE WENT TO GREAT TROUBLE WITH RESEARCH ON THIS ONE TO TELL THEIR STORY.
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SILENT HONOR

A man ahead of his time, Japanese college professor Masao Takashimaya of Kyoto had a passion for modern ideas that was as strong as his wife's belief in ancient traditions. His eighteen-year-old daughter Hiroko, torn between her mother's traditions and her father's wishes, boarded the SS Nagoya Maru to come to California for an education and to make her father proud. It was August 1941.

From the ship, she went to the Palo Alto home of her uncle, Takeo, and his family. To Hiroko, California was a different world. Her cousins ahd become more American than Japanese. And much to Hiroko's suprise, Peter Jenkins, her uncle's assistant at Stanford, became an unexpected link between her old world and her new.

On December 7, Pearl Harbor is bombed by the Japanese. Within hours, war is declared and suddenly Hiroko has become an enemy in a foreign land.

On February 919, Executive Order 9066 is signed by President Roosevelt, giving the military the power to remove the Japanese from their communities at will. Takeo and his family are given ten days to sell their home, give up their jobs, and report to a relocation center, along with thousands of other Japanese and Japanese Americans, to face their destinies there. Families are divided, people are forced to abanon their homes, their businesses, their freedom, and their lives.

Danielle Steel portrays not only the human cost of that terrible time in history, but also the remarkable courage of a people whose honor and dignity transcended the chaos that surrounded them. Silent Honor reveals the stark truth about the betrayal of Americans by their own government...and the triumph of a woman caught between cultures and determined to survive.
reviewed Silent Honor on + 394 more book reviews
upper/outer corner missing on cover